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mark1447

Westchester plans to overhaul 'tired' accordion buses

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Westchester County is rehabilitating its elongated buses — the ones with the accordion section in the middle — to stretch their life five years or so.

 

The over $10 million project is intended to overhaul the 78 vehicles, called articulated buses, that are the workhorses of the Bee-Line bus system.

 

With an average of 500,000 miles on each, the buses are "getting tired," said Richard Stiller, director of surface transportation with the county's Public Works and Transportation Department.

 

Operating in the lower part of the county, the buses take the busiest runs and the busiest times, carrying more than 33,000 passengers a day.

 

That amounts to about 29 percent of the overall daily ridership, while the buses make up about 22 percent of the total fleet.

 

"I generally refer to them as the backbone of the fleet," Stiller said.

 

But wrangling in Washington over the federal budget could make the renovation project more difficult to complete.

 

The Department of Public Works and Transportation has $4.5 million — almost half the $10 million needed — saved when buses in recent years were purchased at lower cost than expected, Stiller said.

 

County transportation officials will have to look for the additional $5.5 million to finish the job. The county receives about $9.5 million a year in federal aid to fund many things, such as mechanics' salaries and new bus shelters.

 

More:

 

http://www.lohud.com/article/20110708/NEWS02/107080339/Westchester-plans-overhaul-tired-accordion-buses?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|Westchester%20County,%20New%20York

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They can't just purchase new buses, like the Nova LFSA?

 

Judging by this article I doubt they can afford to; the Feds will kick in to replace buses that are 12-plus years old, but not before. The buses are only 9-10 years old, so they wouldn't be eligible for replacement funds until 2013-2014. Our order of LFSAs is costing us $600-650,000 per bus, and their order would likely be no bigger than our original order. These buses cost $475,000 apiece new, and if they were resold as used would probably only fetch $300,000 or less each, leaving a gap of at least $300,000 (almost half the purchase price) per new Nova. Given that they only have half the funds in place for a $135,000 per bus rehab program I doubt that replacement is an option.

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i think this is good move they are going to save money and do you think the rebuilt engines are going to be 2010 EPA diesel emission standards.

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This is Interesting the Bee's Artics don't even look that old for their age whatsoever whatever rehab they get would probably be worth it though.

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This is Interesting the Bee's Artics don't even look that old for their age whatsoever whatever rehab they get would probably be worth it though.

 

The articulated joint is weak, the motors are not putting out as mush horses as they use too, the wheelchair ramp constantly fails, and the lights in some buses are extremely too dim compared to the NABIs, and Orions. Beeline does do a good job with keeping them spotless tho hence why they don't look their age.

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The articulated joint is weak, the motors are not putting out as mush horses as they use too, the wheelchair ramp constantly fails, and the lights in some buses are extremely too dim compared to the NABIs, and Orions. Beeline does do a good job with keeping them spotless tho hence why they don't look their age.

 

Those Neoplans had issues when they first came in. I remember riding them regularly on the 45 and the 60 in 2005 and theyd squeak as much as a bus three times their age. I also recall a few fires if I'm not mistaken.

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those artics are squeaky but they look good. I always thought beeline should have purchased New Flyer D60's instead of the Neoplans. An overhaul is need. Better to keep the high floor neo's then get new-gen low floor artics. The MTA should rehab some the D60's. They hold way more passengers comfortably then the Novas.

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i think this is good move they are going to save money and do you think the rebuilt engines are going to be 2010 EPA diesel emission standards.

 

No. It's just a rebuild, not a new engine. New power plants would have to be purchase to bring to bus to EPA10 standards, and BeeLine doesn't have money for that. EPA10 engines run $50k brand new. EPA07 rebuilds/new engines are even pushing $40k still. The engine is the single most expensive component on a bus.

 

those artics are squeaky but they look good. I always thought beeline should have purchased New Flyer D60's instead of the Neoplans. An overhaul is need. Better to keep the high floor neo's then get new-gen low floor artics. The MTA should rehab some the D60's. They hold way more passengers comfortably then the Novas.

 

They are rehabbing some of the newer D60's to extend the life.

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They are rehabbing some of the newer D60's to extend the life.

That's good to hear. I've become very fond to the D60's since I first saw one being tested on the Bx5 in 96'.

 

i think BeeLine256 means are they rebuilding the engines with the rest of the bus. I imagine they are.

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That's good to hear. I've become very fond to the D60's since I first saw one being tested on the Bx5 in 96'.

 

i think BeeLine256 means are they rebuilding the engines with the rest of the bus. I imagine they are.

yeah thats what i meant and dose bee line run on clean diesel fuel or no.

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Cause they need to redo the braking system most likely, and also it's not standard in these Neoplans.

 

The use of Jake brakes aka Jacobs engine brake, are not useful in a transit bus application. For a Jake break to be effective, the vehicle needs to be moving at a speed above 30 MPH. Rarely do transit buses get going that fast.

 

Transit typically uses a transmission retarder to slow down buses. It extends break life.

 

BTW - Westchester's Neoplans have transmission retarders.

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