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I Will Be Glad When The MTA Has A 100% Low Floor Fleet


The I Man

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Due to my having eight knee surgeries over the last ten years my mobility has been pretty limited. A few weeks ago while riding the Q-88 bus I signaled to stop at Springfield Blvd and 73 Ave. The bus arrived at the stop and the operator opened the rear door. Since he was several feet away from the curb, I had to take a long step to get down and off the bus. When I did so, I felt my knee buckle and I fell to the ground in severe pain. The MRI revealed that I had ruptured my Patella, probably the only original equipment remaining in my left knee. I will admit that I don't use public transit too often anymore as I live and work in Queens and even own two cars to make sure that I always have one available, but the incident left me wishing that the MTA would get rid of all of the RTS's and Orion V's tomorrow, and not in three or four years. I am considering legal action against the MTA. Had the bus been low floor I am positive that this wouldn't have occurred:mad:.

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Due to my having eight knee surgeries over the last ten years my mobility has been pretty limited. A few weeks ago while riding the Q-88 bus I signaled to stop at Springfield Blvd and 73 Ave. The bus arrived at the stop and the operator opened the rear door. Since he was several feet away from the curb, I had to take a long step to get down and off the bus. When I did so, I felt my knee buckle and I fell to the ground in severe pain. The MRI revealed that I had ruptured my Patella, probably the only original equipment remaining in my left knee. I will admit that I don't use public transit too often anymore as I live and work in Queens and even own two cars to make sure that I always have one available, but the incident left me wishing that the MTA would get rid of all of the RTS's and Orion V's tomorrow, and not in three or four years. I am considering legal action against the MTA. Had the bus been low floor I am positive that this wouldn't have occurred:mad:.

 

I am sorry to hear about your issue, but you can't blame a transit agency for not having a 100 percent low floor fleet. If you want a low floor bus, wait for the next one. In case you haven't noticed the (MTA) is ordering low floors like no tomorrow. So I'd wait another 5-10 years before you ride a transit bus again.

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Actually I blame the operator for not stopping at the curb when he had ample room to do so. Looking at the TTMG roster, the last of the remaining high floor buses will reach the unoffical 15 year life cycle by 2015.

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I love the low floor buses. My only beef is that they are too narrow, but wheelchairs and exiting and boarding are much easier, even with the slowest of slow pokes. The low floor buses smell worse though than the RTSs though. :eek: Mop, soap, hot water... Meet low floor bus. LOL

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You should have told the bus operator to use the lift if you have trouble climbing the steps. And FTR, low-floors aren't that great especially in NYC.

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Due to my having eight knee surgeries over the last ten years my mobility has been pretty limited. A few weeks ago while riding the Q-88 bus I signaled to stop at Springfield Blvd and 73 Ave. The bus arrived at the stop and the operator opened the rear door. Since he was several feet away from the curb, I had to take a long step to get down and off the bus. When I did so, I felt my knee buckle and I fell to the ground in severe pain. The MRI revealed that I had ruptured my Patella, probably the only original equipment remaining in my left knee. I will admit that I don't use public transit too often anymore as I live and work in Queens and even own two cars to make sure that I always have one available, but the incident left me wishing that the MTA would get rid of all of the RTS's and Orion V's tomorrow, and not in three or four years. I am considering legal action against the MTA. Had the bus been low floor I am positive that this wouldn't have occurred:mad:.
im sorry to hear that bro,but next time if your getting on a bus and its a highfloor ask the driver for the lift by law we cant refuse you.:tup:
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Due to my having eight knee surgeries over the last ten years my mobility has been pretty limited. A few weeks ago while riding the Q-88 bus I signaled to stop at Springfield Blvd and 73 Ave. The bus arrived at the stop and the operator opened the rear door. Since he was several feet away from the curb, I had to take a long step to get down and off the bus. When I did so, I felt my knee buckle and I fell to the ground in severe pain. The MRI revealed that I had ruptured my Patella, probably the only original equipment remaining in my left knee. I will admit that I don't use public transit too often anymore as I live and work in Queens and even own two cars to make sure that I always have one available, but the incident left me wishing that the MTA would get rid of all of the RTS's and Orion V's tomorrow, and not in three or four years. I am considering legal action against the MTA. Had the bus been low floor I am positive that this wouldn't have occurred:mad:.

 

I'm very sorry to hear about that. There is really nothing that can be done though. The bottom step is also the same height as most standard low floors, and the MTA is not obligated to have an all low floor fleet, or any low floor buses at all for that matter.

 

With many of the newer RTS', Orion V's and New Flyer Artics being rehabbed, and or overhauled, they will pretty much remain in the fleet through the rest of the decade. The RTS' will likely stay around the longest.

 

Hope your knees get better!

 

I love the low floor buses. My only beef is that they are too narrow, but wheelchairs and exiting and boarding are much easier, even with the slowest of slow pokes. The low floor buses smell worse though than the RTSs though. :eek: Mop, soap, hot water... Meet low floor bus. LOL

 

LF's and HF's are the same width.

 

Very to sorry to hear about your accident.

 

While I agree that high-floor buses are indeed trickier to get off of, it sounds like your injury occurred stepping from the lowest step onto the street. Had it been a low-floor bus it's hard to say if that would have helped, as the buses are all a certain height off the ground, and if the operator stopped too far away, no type of bus will help that. Low-floor buses eliminate the steps, but the actual floor is not, as far as I know, any closer to the ground than the first/last step on a high-floor bus. It sounds like this was a case of an obstructed bus lane or operator error that caused your injury.

 

An LF is pretty much the same floor height as the bottom step on a HF. The Orion VII however is a little lower to the ground thanks to those smaller tires.

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Due to my having eight knee surgeries over the last ten years my mobility has been pretty limited. A few weeks ago while riding the Q-88 bus I signaled to stop at Springfield Blvd and 73 Ave. The bus arrived at the stop and the operator opened the rear door. Since he was several feet away from the curb, I had to take a long step to get down and off the bus. When I did so, I felt my knee buckle and I fell to the ground in severe pain. The MRI revealed that I had ruptured my Patella, probably the only original equipment remaining in my left knee. I will admit that I don't use public transit too often anymore as I live and work in Queens and even own two cars to make sure that I always have one available, but the incident left me wishing that the MTA would get rid of all of the RTS's and Orion V's tomorrow, and not in three or four years. I am considering legal action against the MTA. Had the bus been low floor I am positive that this wouldn't have occurred:mad:.

Very sorry to hear that. This is why LF buses are needed

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If it was the bottom-most step then you would've been straight out of luck on a low floor regardless, it's still some reasonable height from the street to the first step if the bus isn't at the curb

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Looking at an online roster, the lst high floor buses should be retired by 2014 or 2015.

 

Whether its Low Floor/High Floor, you could have been injured anywhere. Its not about just because its a high floor bus.

 

....things happen.

 

Im not saying you wasnt, but I watch alot of people get off the bus and not even looking where they step.

 

Some bus stops its hard to get right to the curb due to cars parked to close to the bus stop. In that case if that was a kneeling bus the driver should have used it. Every time I cant get close to the curb I use it.

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Whether its Low Floor/High Floor, you could have been injured anywhere. Its not about just because its a high floor bus.

 

....things happen.

 

Im not saying you wasnt, but I watch alot of people get off the bus and not even looking where they step.

 

Some bus stops its hard to get right to the curb due to cars parked to close to the bus stop. In that case if that was a kneeling bus the driver should have used it. Every time I cant get close to the curb I use it.

 

My condition forces me to be very careful where I step. I do agree that my injury could have happened anywhere. The ironic thing is that before this incident, the last time I rode a bus was on June 25, 2010 and that was to mourn the final run of my beloved Q-75. Like I said, I own two cars to make sure that I always have at least one available to get around.

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then again the low floors have handles on the doors i dont recall seeing them on the RTS

 

You're right, I know the Orion 5s have handles on their doors because they open inward whereas the RTS' doors swing out.

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Looking at an online roster, the lst high floor buses should be retired by 2014 or 2015.

 

You can't really go by that roster. The newest RTS' still have 7-9 years of service left in them.

 

In RE:kneeling

does that apply to the whole bus kneeling or just the front? i assume the kneel feature is achieved by deflating the air bags in the air ride

 

The kneeling system does exactly that, but only in the front.

 

then again the low floors have handles on the doors i dont recall seeing them on the RTS

 

RTS' have 2 grab handles in the rear step well, and one in the front.

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Due to my having eight knee surgeries over the last ten years my mobility has been pretty limited. A few weeks ago while riding the Q-88 bus I signaled to stop at Springfield Blvd and 73 Ave. The bus arrived at the stop and the operator opened the rear door. Since he was several feet away from the curb, I had to take a long step to get down and off the bus. When I did so, I felt my knee buckle and I fell to the ground in severe pain. The MRI revealed that I had ruptured my Patella, probably the only original equipment remaining in my left knee. I will admit that I don't use public transit too often anymore as I live and work in Queens and even own two cars to make sure that I always have one available, but the incident left me wishing that the MTA would get rid of all of the RTS's and Orion V's tomorrow, and not in three or four years. I am considering legal action against the MTA. Had the bus been low floor I am positive that this wouldn't have occurred:mad:.

 

Sorry to hear that sir. If a problem arises and you don't like using Bus or Subway. I suggest you use (MTA)s own Paratransit "Access-A-Ride" Google it.

 

TBH, im more of a fan of High Floor buses then low floors, more room and a long history. Though, the negative comes in for maintenance, disabled/seniors and speed of passenger loads. This is why the (MTA) is transitioning, same for other transit firms.

 

For replacing HF with LF now... I don't think so.. Sorry, not sooo fast. HF will still be in the system for another 5-10 years. With a maybe of the 2003 New Flyers being the last of the HF.

 

Legal action? Idk why sue to the (MTA). Its not gonna cause miracles to happen in just 1 second.. No purpose. If you wish to take action against a driver, then contact the (MTA). But legal I won't bother, unless a big issue occurred, a fight with driver or what ever.

 

Nothing against you or the (MTA). Just playing fare.

 

The Bus is not to blame for any of this. Next time your better off exiting the front by asking the driver or getting a Low floor bus (EVEN THO not all routes you will see with low floors).

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