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TwoTimer

What we actually do.

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I can't speak for other titles not in RTO, as I was never a track worker (MoW) or cleaner (Station/DCE/RTO) or agent/clerk (Stations) I was only a train operator (now), tower operator (2008-9) and conductor (2006-8). After this thread, I'll post something else that I think he (the TWU haters) is thinking when it comes to us.

 

This was my day today on a minute by minute basis (I'm extra extra, a term for people getting random jobs five days a week around the system. I do not have enough seniority to pick and I wont pick probably until the end of next year).

 

I worked the (A) line today. This particular trick (job) starts at 2:32 at Lefferts and ends at 9:19 at 207. I signed in at 2:15. I sat in the crew facility and ate lunch. I was questioned (deformed) by a supervisor at 2:35 since I'm not a regular at Lefferts.

 

I was at my position getting ready at 2:43, and the train left at 2:47, on time. I got to 207 at 4:01, two minutes early. I was summoned by the supervisor at 207, and was told I had to store a train later tonite. I used the bathroom, went upstairs to get a soda, and was back on the platform awaiting my train, drinking the soda.

 

My train was supposed to leave 207 at 4:27, at 4:27 no train was there ready to go, it was pulling in. I had a few seconds to dispose of my soda bottle, and the train left at 4:30, three minutes late. I went to Far Rock this time, and I brought my train there at 6:01, three minutes early (yes me and my partner made up six minutes in rush hour). I had the rest of the lunch I bought at Lefferts, used the bathroom again (drink more water). I was able to rest for about 20 minutes before getting back on my train at 6:45.

 

The train left at 6:49, on time and we got to 207 at 8:20, two minutes early. I went to the supervisor office and was told my layup was at Dyckman, one station away. I walked back down to the north end of 207 so by the train got there I was at the t/o position. I made sure all eight cars were clean, unlocking storm doors along the way. I stored the train at 207 yard, put four handbrakes on the train (more than that yard needs but I like to be safe being new), and walked back to 207. I signed out at 9:15, yes four minutes earlier than when I was supposed to, but after using the bathroom again, it was 9:20 by time I got upstairs, so technically I was on the property until my clearing time.

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Now what the passenger (like this person) sees.

 

Cleanliness:

 

He sees stations not clean and rats everywhere, garbage piling up. In other subway systems, rats are few and far in between and are much cleaner, although they move far fewer people. "Oh, that MUST be TWU cleaners slacking off". As far as the garbage, the reason it tends to sit there is because there's too much service for garbage trains (Yes I know passengers have heard of those) to pick up garbage at stations during the day (usually). The only thing cleaners can do is during non-rush hours, move it to holding areas until the train can come pick it up during the wee hours. Maybe he wants the pickup train to sit in the station for three minutes at Union Sq on the Lex at 10am blocking service to get the garbage left over from the AM rush ASAP, and rinse and repeat at Astor Pl, and every station afterwards.

 

During the midnight hours, its not common to have one cleaner responsible for garbage collection for four or more stations. There are teams of cleaners who show up in groups to scrub (yes actually scrub) the platform, and the smell of bleach is strong while they're doing it. Of course during general orders (GO) when tracks are out of service, its more difficult to do garbage collection.

 

Maintenance:

 

About those darn GO's. He must look out the side window (RFW when available) when the train is blaring the horn (railfans usually sit in the first car) going slow. He sees people on the roadbed in orange vests just standing there doing nothing watching the train go by. "Oh that's them slacking off again not working while the train goes by and slowing down the trains making them late". Who this person actually saw are flaggers, who's job is to sit there and do nothing except one important job: protect the work gang, which may or MAY NOT be TWU (could just be contractors who have no idea of track safety).

 

Mind you, the work gang is not allowed to work when the train is going by so unless one wishes the track be taken completely OoS so the work can be done quicker instead of short bursts when there's no train around... Also, what if the actual work is in the train's RoW? Can't do work on the running rail or guard rail, the same place the train's wheelbase runs on while the train is actually occupying those spaces now, can we?

 

About the signal fudging, at times supervisors were with the maintainer crew doing these inspections, and they also signed off on it... but of course, blame the hourly not the supervisor. Or do we want flagging end to end of hmmm lets see... the (F) line just so every last signal can be inspected.

 

The eyes and ears:

 

Are our train operators, station agents, and conductors (of course cleaners too, but that was discussed earlier in the thread). We get a picture every now and again about sleeping agents in booths. He thinks, "oh wow, that must be if not a good portion, but most of TWU". I'm sure TA will also pay this guy $45k starting to stay up at lonely, desolate stations (with no cell phone or radio signal) where one person an hour might stop by the booth (smart straphangers have their metro ready so they don't have to take their wallet out in the wee hours). Its as if of all working people including those that make more than the average transit worker, he must think "ONLY TWU workers sleep on the clock on the overnight shift, and not cops (who generally can make more and can retire sooner), sanitation (who make more and can retire sooner) or firemen (who make more and must retire sooner)".

 

Oh a conductor hits someone with the doors or a train operator's train goes in emergency (that loud CHOW sound). Oops, "there's that TWU conductor not paying attention or being picky and not holding the train because I know they saw me". Or "there's that idiot overpaid TWU train operator giving a rough ride. Maybe he sees crews hanging out on the platform at terminals (Pelham, Parkchester, Utica (4) and Stillwell mezzanine come to mind). "Oh there's those lazy overpaid TWU workers just sitting around smoking doing nothing", but the cops who are on the platform chilling are doing a phenomenal job. Perhaps those TWU workers are on lunch (with that many lines at Stillwell, someone has bound to be on lunch and smoking isn't allowed in the crew facility or at all, but its only enforced for passengers).

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All I know is today I was on the (6) train heading frrom Grand Central to Union Square. I got on in the first car as usual so that I can get out of the Union Square station quickly, as I needed to stop at Food Emporium and then over to Whole Foods before heading back on the bus to my office in Midtown. We pulled into 23rd street and what do I see on top of two huge black garbage bags but a big @ss rat. That thing was HUGE. I mean he was big enough that it looked like he had been bench pressing. I was thinking sh*t let that f*cker stay right where he is. He was so busy eating that he didn't seem at all phased by the train either. Suffice it to say that the platform was FILTHY. I mean it was so dirty it was like black with all sorts of nasty stains and God knows what else. :eek: :eek: :eek:

 

Now what the passenger (like this person) sees.

 

Cleanliness:

 

He sees stations not clean and rats everywhere, garbage piling up. In other subway systems, rats are few and far in between and are much cleaner, although they move far fewer people. "Oh, that MUST be TWU cleaners slacking off". As far as the garbage, the reason it tends to sit there is because there's too much service for garbage trains (Yes I know passengers have heard of those) to pick up garbage at stations during the day (usually). The only thing cleaners can do is during non-rush hours, move it to holding areas until the train can come pick it up during the wee hours. Maybe he wants the pickup train to sit in the station for three minutes at Union Sq on the Lex at 10am blocking service to get the garbage left over from the AM rush ASAP, and rinse and repeat at Astor Pl, and every station afterwards.

 

During the midnight hours, its not common to have one cleaner responsible for garbage collection for four or more stations. There are teams of cleaners who show up in groups to scrub (yes actually scrub) the platform, and the smell of bleach is strong while they're doing it. Of course during general orders (GO) when tracks are out of service, its more difficult to do garbage collection.

 

Maintenance:

 

About those darn GO's. He must look out the side window (RFW when available) when the train is blaring the horn (railfans usually sit in the first car) going slow. He sees people on the roadbed in orange vests just standing there doing nothing watching the train go by. "Oh that's them slacking off again not working while the train goes by and slowing down the trains making them late". Who this person actually saw are flaggers, who's job is to sit there and do nothing except one important job: protect the work gang, which may or MAY NOT be TWU (could just be contractors who have no idea of track safety).

 

Mind you, the work gang is not allowed to work when the train is going by so unless one wishes the track be taken completely OoS so the work can be done quicker instead of short bursts when there's no train around... Also, what if the actual work is in the train's RoW? Can't do work on the running rail or guard rail, the same place the train's wheelbase runs on while the train is actually occupying those spaces now, can we?

 

About the signal fudging, at times supervisors were with the maintainer crew doing these inspections, and they also signed off on it... but of course, blame the hourly not the supervisor. Or do we want flagging end to end of hmmm lets see... the (F) line just so every last signal can be inspected.

 

The eyes and ears:

 

Are our train operators, station agents, and conductors (of course cleaners too, but that was discussed earlier in the thread). We get a picture every now and again about sleeping agents in booths. He thinks, "oh wow, that must be if not a good portion, but most of TWU". I'm sure TA will also pay this guy $45k starting to stay up at lonely, desolate stations (with no cell phone or radio signal) where one person an hour might stop by the booth (smart straphangers have their metro ready so they don't have to take their wallet out in the wee hours). Its as if of all working people including those that make more than the average transit worker, he must think "ONLY TWU workers sleep on the clock on the overnight shift, and not cops (who generally can make more and can retire sooner), sanitation (who make more and can retire sooner) or firemen (who make more and must retire sooner)".

 

Oh a conductor hits someone with the doors or a train operator's train goes in emergency (that loud CHOW sound). Oops, "there's that TWU conductor not paying attention or being picky and not holding the train because I know they saw me". Or "there's that idiot overpaid TWU train operator giving a rough ride. Maybe he sees crews hanging out on the platform at terminals (Pelham, Parkchester, Utica (4) and Stillwell mezzanine come to mind). "Oh there's those lazy overpaid TWU workers just sitting around smoking doing nothing", but the cops who are on the platform chilling are doing a phenomenal job. Perhaps those TWU workers are on lunch (with that many lines at Stillwell, someone has bound to be on lunch and smoking isn't allowed in the crew facility or at all, but its only enforced for passengers).

 

I think folks wouldn't make such a big deal about it if you didn't have workers bragging about how well they're paid and how little they do. That's the real issue. I have seen it on other forums where B/Os will throw out how they're protected by the union and how they can do this that and the third and nothing will happen because the union has their back.

 

That's what I call abusing a situation and making it bad for those who do their jobs right. It's like yeah I got the union behind me so f*ck you guys.

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While it is true MTA subway train operators are paid higher than representative jobs in other cities (only Washington DC WMATA is close, and for instance Miami subway t/o starts at $14 an hour topping out at $18), we are actually the lowest paid in our profession for all people who do similar work in this area. Metro North and LIRR are paid more (of course different system, they are engineers and have a license to operate locomotives), and of course there's Amtrak, but the Work Train division has similar equipment to those of railroads (minus the passenger trains). And the trains are also fundamentally built the same.

 

Now not all trains have conductors. WMATA runs shorter trains so only one person crew. Miami same deal (I rode the Miami subway from its Amtrak station into downtown). Obviously TWU has fought tooth and nail to keep conductors on trains, without TWU the at least the (L)(7) and (G) would be conductor free 24/7, and maybe the (C)(M) and (J) as well. Lots of cost savings, yes. Oh but we're so GD lazy. Away with C/R's on lines with trains short enough to get away with it (the (7) has the longest train in the IRT) Would all those passengers in rush hour mind when there's a door problem on the (7) at Grand Central at 730am in a jam packed train in the last car, the nearest person that can correct that problem is 550 feet away... takes 5 mins just for a skinny t/o to get back there at that hour.

 

If we're so lazy, why not go all the way and get rid of station agents altogether, close every booth and have people navigate via the series of maps and vending machines. If that card doesn't work, too bad (unless the smart key thing is expanded systemwide). If a women gets robbed at 2am at lonely East 143st in the Bronx too bad, unless one wants to put a cop on duty in every station 24/7, basically making them what station agents used to be, shifting the burden of cost from MTA to the City. If a GO shuts down a section of track, its on the passengers to recognize what GO's are right? Or how they not waste their money entering the system with no one in the station to direct them to alternate methods of travel (except that cleaner who might just be there, or wait that person got 12 other platforms to maintain...18% shot).

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go buy a punching bag, you'll feel better. take my word on it.

 

No need i dont detect any thing hostle with his post hes just provong a point to somebody who cant prove a point right mr Philly?

 

Thanks for playing Tokkemon, let me know when you want to disscuss the issue...

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All I know is today I was on the (6) train heading frrom Grand Central to Union Square. I got on in the first car as usual so that I can get out of the Union Square station quickly, as I needed to stop at Food Emporium and then over to Whole Foods before heading back on the bus to my office in Midtown. We pulled into 23rd street and what do I see on top of two huge black garbage bags but a big @ss rat. That thing was HUGE. I mean he was big enough that it looked like he had been bench pressing. I was thinking sh*t let that f*cker stay right where he is. He was so busy eating that he didn't seem at all phased by the train either. Suffice it to say that the platform was FILTHY. I mean it was so dirty it was like black with all sorts of nasty stains and God knows what else. :eek: :eek: :eek:

 

 

 

I think folks wouldn't make such a big deal about it if you didn't have workers bragging about how well they're paid and how little they do. That's the real issue. I have seen it on other forums where B/Os will throw out how they're protected by the union and how they can do this that and the third and nothing will happen because the union has their back.

 

That's what I call abusing a situation and making it bad for those who do their jobs right. It's like yeah I got the union behind me so f*ck you guys.

 

Classic example of people using a few to throw the whole sum under the Bus..

 

Very Intelligent...

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Classic example of people using a few to throw the whole sum under the Bus..

 

Very Intelligent...

 

It's unfortunate, but that's what happens. For all of the nice ones, usually folks remember the sour apples the most.

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No need i dont detect any thing hostle with his post hes just provong a point to somebody who cant prove a point right mr Philly?

 

Thanks for playing Tokkemon, let me know when you want to disscuss the issue...

 

No hostility indeed I'm actually in a jovial mood, going to Miami tomorrow on vacay won't be around till Sunday.

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Thanks for playing Tokkemon, let me know when you want to disscuss the issue...

 

What issue? You have your opinion, I have mine.

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What issue? You have your opinion, I have mine.

 

Yep a very Biased one at that but thats Ok...

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Two-Timer,

 

Thanks for a great post! It should make people reconsider just how much they think they know. As a union man myself, I also appreciate how much anti-union sentiment is out there as if management is so wonderful without checks and balances.

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two timer's second post read to me as stress induced. beating on something is usually a great for that.

 

It wasn't if you read the other post you would know this.

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My belief is that certain jobs, like T/O, TSS, tower op, cleaner, track worker, etc. deserve every bit of pay they get. They usually do a good job too.

 

There are some other jobs that I don't see this way. (S/A can be both ways, they really should pay WAY more for busy stations!)

 

For cops, sitting around is their job. When I see MTA workers sitting around, I usually don't think of it as a waste of money. Only exceptions: people not doing their jobs when there is clearly work (track work on the opposite side or on closed outdoor lines w/o trains coming, cleaners sitting in dirty trains); and station agents sitting in empty stations (which is the fault of the MTA not the employee(s).)

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I can't speak for other titles not in RTO, as I was never a track worker (MoW) or cleaner (Station/DCE/RTO) or agent/clerk (Stations) I was only a train operator (now), tower operator (2008-9) and conductor (2006-8). After this thread, I'll post something else that I think he (the TWU haters) is thinking when it comes to us.

 

This was my day today on a minute by minute basis (I'm extra extra, a term for people getting random jobs five days a week around the system. I do not have enough seniority to pick and I wont pick probably until the end of next year).

 

I worked the (A) line today. This particular trick (job) starts at 2:32 at Lefferts and ends at 9:19 at 207. I signed in at 2:15. I sat in the crew facility and ate lunch. I was questioned (deformed) by a supervisor at 2:35 since I'm not a regular at Lefferts.

 

I was at my position getting ready at 2:43, and the train left at 2:47, on time. I got to 207 at 4:01, two minutes early. I was summoned by the supervisor at 207, and was told I had to store a train later tonite. I used the bathroom, went upstairs to get a soda, and was back on the platform awaiting my train, drinking the soda.

 

My train was supposed to leave 207 at 4:27, at 4:27 no train was there ready to go, it was pulling in. I had a few seconds to dispose of my soda bottle, and the train left at 4:30, three minutes late. I went to Far Rock this time, and I brought my train there at 6:01, three minutes early (yes me and my partner made up six minutes in rush hour). I had the rest of the lunch I bought at Lefferts, used the bathroom again (drink more water). I was able to rest for about 20 minutes before getting back on my train at 6:45.

 

The train left at 6:49, on time and we got to 207 at 8:20, two minutes early. I went to the supervisor office and was told my layup was at Dyckman, one station away. I walked back down to the north end of 207 so by the train got there I was at the t/o position. I made sure all eight cars were clean, unlocking storm doors along the way. I stored the train at 207 yard, put four handbrakes on the train (more than that yard needs but I like to be safe being new), and walked back to 207. I signed out at 9:15, yes four minutes earlier than when I was supposed to, but after using the bathroom again, it was 9:20 by time I got upstairs, so technically I was on the property until my clearing time.

 

This is a very interesting post. Thanks for sharing, as many people, including myself, don't know this line of work. I do appreciate all that MTA workers do. Indeed, without them, there would be no Subway at all.

 

Now what the passenger (like this person) sees.

 

Cleanliness:

 

He sees stations not clean and rats everywhere, garbage piling up. In other subway systems, rats are few and far in between and are much cleaner, although they move far fewer people. "Oh, that MUST be TWU cleaners slacking off". As far as the garbage, the reason it tends to sit there is because there's too much service for garbage trains (Yes I know passengers have heard of those) to pick up garbage at stations during the day (usually). The only thing cleaners can do is during non-rush hours, move it to holding areas until the train can come pick it up during the wee hours. Maybe he wants the pickup train to sit in the station for three minutes at Union Sq on the Lex at 10am blocking service to get the garbage left over from the AM rush ASAP, and rinse and repeat at Astor Pl, and every station afterwards.

 

During the midnight hours, its not common to have one cleaner responsible for garbage collection for four or more stations. There are teams of cleaners who show up in groups to scrub (yes actually scrub) the platform, and the smell of bleach is strong while they're doing it. Of course during general orders (GO) when tracks are out of service, its more difficult to do garbage collection.

 

Maintenance:

 

About those darn GO's. He must look out the side window (RFW when available) when the train is blaring the horn (railfans usually sit in the first car) going slow. He sees people on the roadbed in orange vests just standing there doing nothing watching the train go by. "Oh that's them slacking off again not working while the train goes by and slowing down the trains making them late". Who this person actually saw are flaggers, who's job is to sit there and do nothing except one important job: protect the work gang, which may or MAY NOT be TWU (could just be contractors who have no idea of track safety).

 

Mind you, the work gang is not allowed to work when the train is going by so unless one wishes the track be taken completely OoS so the work can be done quicker instead of short bursts when there's no train around... Also, what if the actual work is in the train's RoW? Can't do work on the running rail or guard rail, the same place the train's wheelbase runs on while the train is actually occupying those spaces now, can we?

 

About the signal fudging, at times supervisors were with the maintainer crew doing these inspections, and they also signed off on it... but of course, blame the hourly not the supervisor. Or do we want flagging end to end of hmmm lets see... the (F) line just so every last signal can be inspected.

 

The eyes and ears:

 

Are our train operators, station agents, and conductors (of course cleaners too, but that was discussed earlier in the thread). We get a picture every now and again about sleeping agents in booths. He thinks, "oh wow, that must be if not a good portion, but most of TWU". I'm sure TA will also pay this guy $45k starting to stay up at lonely, desolate stations (with no cell phone or radio signal) where one person an hour might stop by the booth (smart straphangers have their metro ready so they don't have to take their wallet out in the wee hours). Its as if of all working people including those that make more than the average transit worker, he must think "ONLY TWU workers sleep on the clock on the overnight shift, and not cops (who generally can make more and can retire sooner), sanitation (who make more and can retire sooner) or firemen (who make more and must retire sooner)".

 

Oh a conductor hits someone with the doors or a train operator's train goes in emergency (that loud CHOW sound). Oops, "there's that TWU conductor not paying attention or being picky and not holding the train because I know they saw me". Or "there's that idiot overpaid TWU train operator giving a rough ride. Maybe he sees crews hanging out on the platform at terminals (Pelham, Parkchester, Utica (4) and Stillwell mezzanine come to mind). "Oh there's those lazy overpaid TWU workers just sitting around smoking doing nothing", but the cops who are on the platform chilling are doing a phenomenal job. Perhaps those TWU workers are on lunch (with that many lines at Stillwell, someone has bound to be on lunch and smoking isn't allowed in the crew facility or at all, but its only enforced for passengers).

 

Now, now. I'm not like the stereotypical cynic above. Yes, some people take it too far and blame the TWU for everything. I don't. I blame them for some things, but hardly all. The MTA's situation is a result of years of issues that have aggregated over time, like a snowball, if you will. Politicians, management, over-zealous unions, and the passengers themselves are all to blame. Its just that when I see a union who strikes over pensions to retire at 55(!) and cheats the city out of over $1 billion of revenue on one of the busiest shopping weeks of the year, and is an illegal strike at that, I get a little disgusted. So I apologize for perhaps a few bad apples tainting your entire organization, but, in my view, they earned that tarnish back in 2005.

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So How Long Are You Going To Carry That Chip On Your Shoulder?

 

You have the complete right to carry whatever chip, gripe, or complaint you want for as long as you want, and to dwell on such chip, gripe, or complaint as much or as little as you want.

 

However, all I ask is that you let us know when that chip, gripe, or complaint is getting a bit too heavy, and you want to put it down.

 

Folks have a variety of chips, gripes and complaints, and they carry them for as long (or short) a time as they want. It is your God-given right to have chips, gripes and complaints - it's what makes us "human".

 

There is a point when chips, gripes and complaints can become useful political action for positive change on the part of many people. To me at least that is when such chips, gripes and complaints become really interesting.

 

Until then, enjoy your day.

Mike

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^ You usually make sound posts, but you overdid it w/ the whole chip thing....

We get the point.

----------------------------------

 

 

as for RTOman, I thank you for posting/starting this thread w/ the content you shared... forums can use more posts/insight like this from some of the MTA workers that are in this internet community here... as it would reduce (well, somewhat) the rampant amt. of speculation by us outsiders looking in.....

 

as a free thinker & an anti-crap tolerator, I give you the :tup:

(too bad we don't have the smilie w/ the thumbs up & the beer toasting gif... lol..)

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Now what the passenger (like this person) sees.

 

Cleanliness:

 

He sees stations not clean and rats everywhere, garbage piling up. In other subway systems, rats are few and far in between and are much cleaner, although they move far fewer people. "Oh, that MUST be TWU cleaners slacking off". As far as the garbage, the reason it tends to sit there is because there's too much service for garbage trains (Yes I know passengers have heard of those) to pick up garbage at stations during the day (usually). The only thing cleaners can do is during non-rush hours, move it to holding areas until the train can come pick it up during the wee hours. Maybe he wants the pickup train to sit in the station for three minutes at Union Sq on the Lex at 10am blocking service to get the garbage left over from the AM rush ASAP, and rinse and repeat at Astor Pl, and every station afterwards.

 

During the midnight hours, its not common to have one cleaner responsible for garbage collection for four or more stations. There are teams of cleaners who show up in groups to scrub (yes actually scrub) the platform, and the smell of bleach is strong while they're doing it. Of course during general orders (GO) when tracks are out of service, its more difficult to do garbage collection.

 

Maintenance:

 

About those darn GO's. He must look out the side window (RFW when available) when the train is blaring the horn (railfans usually sit in the first car) going slow. He sees people on the roadbed in orange vests just standing there doing nothing watching the train go by. "Oh that's them slacking off again not working while the train goes by and slowing down the trains making them late". Who this person actually saw are flaggers, who's job is to sit there and do nothing except one important job: protect the work gang, which may or MAY NOT be TWU (could just be contractors who have no idea of track safety).

 

Mind you, the work gang is not allowed to work when the train is going by so unless one wishes the track be taken completely OoS so the work can be done quicker instead of short bursts when there's no train around... Also, what if the actual work is in the train's RoW? Can't do work on the running rail or guard rail, the same place the train's wheelbase runs on while the train is actually occupying those spaces now, can we?

 

About the signal fudging, at times supervisors were with the maintainer crew doing these inspections, and they also signed off on it... but of course, blame the hourly not the supervisor. Or do we want flagging end to end of hmmm lets see... the (F) line just so every last signal can be inspected.

 

The eyes and ears:

 

Are our train operators, station agents, and conductors (of course cleaners too, but that was discussed earlier in the thread). We get a picture every now and again about sleeping agents in booths. He thinks, "oh wow, that must be if not a good portion, but most of TWU". I'm sure TA will also pay this guy $45k starting to stay up at lonely, desolate stations (with no cell phone or radio signal) where one person an hour might stop by the booth (smart straphangers have their metro ready so they don't have to take their wallet out in the wee hours). Its as if of all working people including those that make more than the average transit worker, he must think "ONLY TWU workers sleep on the clock on the overnight shift, and not cops (who generally can make more and can retire sooner), sanitation (who make more and can retire sooner) or firemen (who make more and must retire sooner)".

 

Oh a conductor hits someone with the doors or a train operator's train goes in emergency (that loud CHOW sound). Oops, "there's that TWU conductor not paying attention or being picky and not holding the train because I know they saw me". Or "there's that idiot overpaid TWU train operator giving a rough ride. Maybe he sees crews hanging out on the platform at terminals (Pelham, Parkchester, Utica (4) and Stillwell mezzanine come to mind). "Oh there's those lazy overpaid TWU workers just sitting around smoking doing nothing", but the cops who are on the platform chilling are doing a phenomenal job. Perhaps those TWU workers are on lunch (with that many lines at Stillwell, someone has bound to be on lunch and smoking isn't allowed in the crew facility or at all, but its only enforced for passengers).

 

I have been riding the subway on and off since 1979 (mostly on).I am a passenger that rides the B local in the morning from the Bronx (161)and B/D in the afternoon/eve from 59st. I get annoyed when my train is late. I get annoyed when the D express just arrives in the station at 145st and the B local is pulling out the station. I always thought that most Train operators looked bored and uninterested until I joined this website. I have a new respect for All NYC Transit Personnel. Reading on this site how diffucult School Car is and how difficult it is to stop trains in certain stations. How trains might overun stations if not stopped properly.This site enlightened me to the fact that a Conductor does a lot more than open and close doors. The problem was that you guys make it look to easy. Seriously, you guys make this job look 100x easier than it actually is. So although I will still get pissed when a Conductor closes the door just as make my 3 step jump from the stairs,when I arrive at my destination safely without incident I will say to myself that I got on a train with a good crew. The 7:06 am train that leaves 161st Yankee Stadium always runs smoothly and now I realize it is because there is a good Train operator and Conductor running the show.Thanks NYC Transit!

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