Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.
Sign in to follow this  
JubaionBx12+SBS

What part of "Stand behind the yellow line" don't riders understand?

Recommended Posts

When riding the trains, especially during rush hour, I see tons of riders standing at the platform edge waiting for their train. Last time I checked there is a yellow line on the edge that riders are specifically told to stand behind. Yet, riders do the unsafe thing and stand on the edge. Why don't riders understand that huge crowds standing on the edge is a 12-9 waiting to happen? I always stand behind the yellow line because I don't want to trip or be pushed onto the tracks. Accidents do happen and riders don't seem to care which is sad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When riding the trains, especially during rush hour, I see tons of riders standing at the platform edge waiting for their train. Last time I checked there is a yellow line on the edge that riders are specifically told to stand behind. Yet, riders do the unsafe thing and stand on the edge. Why don't riders understand that huge crowds standing on the edge is a 12-9 waiting to happen? I always stand behind the yellow line because I don't want to trip or be pushed onto the tracks. Accidents do happen and riders don't seem to care which is sad.

 

They want to cause a 12-9 duh...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Some people want to look to see if the train is coming soon. They check if the lights are getting brighter.

 

People do it on the (L) and A-Division lines and they have countdown clocks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's not a bad idea. Some sort of barrier high enough to prevent 12-9's, but low enough for people to rail fan.

 

Shoulder high would be the best bet probably, but then you have the issue of getting the trains to stop in the exact spot that will line up all the doors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's not a bad idea. Some sort of barrier high enough to prevent 12-9's, but low enough for people to rail fan.

 

Pshh... unless you make it from floor to ceiling any barrier would be useless. If it were to be low enough to railfan, I'm sure any suicidal person that keeps themselves in shape would be able to climb over and kill themselves. If the MTA is considering screen doors, I want either the doors to be there from ceiling to floor or not at all. I don't see whats the use of it being up halfway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do people wait in the street, only inches away from speeding cars, for the light to change? In busy areas, such as Midtown, crowds can form and it's just an accident waiting to happen as well I suppose?

 

Just curious, when was the last time someone was PUSHED onto the tracks by someone else, rather than willingly going down/falling?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm sensing a pattern [from the OP] of someone just having too much time on their hands and just griping about everything wrong with the MTA....

 

You might see this pattern because you didn't get the true grasp of what I've posted. This topic has to do with the stupid behavior exhibited by RIDERS. This is certainly not a flaw of the MTA as a system. The fact that the (A) and (C) don't meet performance expectations (another recent topic of mine) is something that riders of those lines know very well so it's not like I have something against the MTA and am looking for something to complain about. I want those lines and all of them to get the best service possible.

 

Now, getting back on topic, I agree that lots of people ignore the rules but in all honesty there's no advantage to standing on the edge of the platform while waiting for the train so I find it strange that many riders do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Now, getting back on topic, I agree that lots of people ignore the rules but in all honesty there's no advantage to standing on the edge of the platform while waiting for the train so I find it strange that many riders do it.

 

Just curious, when you're waiting to cross the street do you wait on the sidewalk and only cross once it says walk? Last time I checked there's no advantage to standing inches away from traffic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest lance25
...in all honesty there's no advantage to standing on the edge of the platform while waiting for the train so I find it strange that many riders do it.

 

People do it because they think that will make the train come faster, even when you have countdown clocks that tell you almost exactly when said train is coming. I'm not saying it's an excuse for stupid behavior; it's just how some folks are.

 

I'm sensing a pattern [from the OP] of someone just having too much time on their hands and just griping about everything wrong with the MTA....

 

You know, usually I agree with you, but I don't see where he's complaining about the (MTA). He said riders tend to lean over the edge of the platform to see if the train is coming. That has nothing to do with how the agency operates or anything.

Edited by lance25
added a comment

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres the answer i feel...

 

LACK OF COMMON SENSE...

 

Ok please continue with the discussion... :cool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Heres the answer i feel...

 

LACK OF COMMON SENSE...

 

Ok please continue with the discussion... :cool:

 

but of course... so many people don't have it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That always also happened on Flushing Line, Queens Blvd lines.

 

Roosevelt Island Tramway has screen door on it's platform to keep people from falling onto tram area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

people are so stupid in this city there is no reason too look over the edge of the platforms, and now with the countdown clocks on the IRT and the (L) people should stand back and wait safely but that wont happen here because people dont care even with the danger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People arent as patient as before, maybe thats why they stand near the edge. I used to do it, but now I know now to do it after what happened to the chef that got slammed by the (5) train a few months ago.

 

basically people are just stupid & arent thinking of the consequences that lie behind just doing that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Count-down clocks are a very recent addition to the subways. Transit riders have been looking down the tracks for trains from the first day when the subway opened - it is a long burned in habit. Plenty of stations do not have count-down clocks and are not expected to get them for a while.

 

Looking down the tracks for the train is not dangerous. Often times, what else is there to look at train service wise? The MTA has been a remarkable job at removing most of the advertising that used to exist on the subways, as well as most newstands or creature comforts. That's why plenty of folks use their current electronic devices or books/newspapers to while away the time.

 

Crossing the yellow line while looking down the tracks for the train is dangerous. Originally the yellow line was meant as a way for the blind to locate the edge of the platform, and to steer folks away from the edge of the platform. The yellow line was not supposed to mean "stand here".

 

The other issue is that it seems the MTA over time has basically removed the word "rapid" from "rapid transit". When folks did not have to worry about train time schedules or when the train would come, or service diversions, or round-about ways of getting somewhere due to G.O.'s - one did not have to look down the track and pray that a train would please come. Remember when the conductor said, "There's a train right behind this one" - and that statement was actually literally true - since one could actually see those train lights. Now who really believes such a statement when the conductor makes it today?

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You might see this pattern because you didn't get the true grasp of what I've posted. This topic has to do with the stupid behavior exhibited by RIDERS. This is certainly not a flaw of the MTA as a system. The fact that the (A) and (C) don't meet performance expectations (another recent topic of mine) is something that riders of those lines know very well so it's not like I have something against the MTA and am looking for something to complain about. I want those lines and all of them to get the best service possible.

 

Now, getting back on topic, I agree that lots of people ignore the rules but in all honesty there's no advantage to standing on the edge of the platform while waiting for the train so I find it strange that many riders do it.

 

Come to think of it.. Maybe you also stand on the edge or even get on the edge to check for trains.. Pretty sure a lot of people on this forum does it too.. Ive done it a few times, but make sure to keep off the edge after a quick check.

 

And the passengers maybe stupid for standing there more then a few seconds, but is it your business for what they do? Your business is for yourself to keep off the line as you want bro. Not worry what others do. If they fall on the tracks, then its on them for not following safety procedures properly.

 

Like there are more important things going on here thats common as well.. Vandalism, trespassers, fighting/harassment etc..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Count-down clocks are a very recent addition to the subways. Transit riders have been looking down the tracks for trains from the first day when the subway opened - it is a long burned in habit. Plenty of stations do not have count-down clocks and are not expected to get them for a while.

 

Looking down the tracks for the train is not dangerous. Often times, what else is there to look at train service wise? The MTA has been a remarkable job at removing most of the advertising that used to exist on the subways, as well as most newstands or creature comforts. That's why plenty of folks use their current electronic devices or books/newspapers to while away the time.

 

Crossing the yellow line while looking down the tracks for the train is dangerous. Originally the yellow line was meant as a way for the blind to locate the edge of the platform, and to steer folks away from the edge of the platform. The yellow line was not supposed to mean "stand here".

 

The other issue is that it seems the MTA over time has basically removed the word "rapid" from "rapid transit". When folks did not have to worry about train time schedules or when the train would come, or service diversions, or round-about ways of getting somewhere due to G.O.'s - one did not have to look down the track and pray that a train would please come. Remember when the conductor said, "There's a train right behind this one" - and that statement was actually literally true - since one could actually see those train lights. Now who really believes such a statement when the conductor makes it today?

 

Mike

ok i dont get how just because some stations dont have the clocks means people should look down the track, first off i saw a person fall over because he tripped on the edge, or in a crowded station on the rush hour people push too see if the train is coming even on the station with a countdown clocks with announcements. its so foolish and dangerous because so many people fall and get killed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forgive me for being off-topic and it may be kind of obvious, but is a 12-9 when someone falls onto the tracks?

 

If so...

 

I agree. Why are people such idiots as to crane their necks out onto the track? The MTA is buying (albeit unreliable) expensive clocks on purpose...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The clocks aren't always the greatest. At the 28th Street Station one time on the (1) the announcement told everyone that a (1) train was going to come into the station in 1 minute. The clock said 6 minutes. Guess what? The train came in in a minute. The clocks aren't good. Once there was an article on Second Avenue Sagas that mentioned that these clocks are a decade old. They have 2000 technology while we are in the year 2011.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.