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6 Lexington Ave

West vs East side IRT

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Well, I know that until SAS is finished, no matter when that will be, the Lex will have an overcrowding problem. But, since the system's most heavily used stations are on the West side, as was pointed out in a post I read, isn't the Broadway/Seventh Avenue IRT more crowded than the Lex. My question is which carries more passengers daily? I didn't use the West side much during my last visit, so I wouldn't know. I used the Lex more and of course overcrowding was an issue.. But, considering the West side has 3 services (at least part of it), even during late nights, does it have more riders than the Lex?

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I believe Lex has been the highest ridership lines for a very long time b\c obviously it's the only subway lines on the east side (4)(5)(6) opposed to the West Side where you have:

6th: (:)(D)(F)(M)

7th: (1)(2)(3) used to be (9)-gone increased (1) service

8th: (A)(C)(E) so the West Side riders have alternatives East Side alternative is basically the M15 SBS.

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Technically, once you get south of 28th you do have two east side lines as the Broadway (N)(Q)(R) comes over to the east side where Broadway crosses with 5th Avenue, while the 6th Avenue (as well as Broadway) line are of course only south of 59th street.

 

That said, yes, the Lexington line is by far the most crowded and the SAS can't come fast enough.

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I think the poster was referencing just the 59-125 stretch on both the lenox and broadway trunks vs the irt. The problems are not similar, but rather unique. The presence of the cpw lines is not to be considered

Edited by TwoTimer

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I think the West Side is well served, and the (7) Extension would help snuff out any remaining problems the West Side has. Well except for the areas of 23rd Street, and 14th Street which hopefully will be served if the (7) will be extended farther south in the future, but not in my life time of course.

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Lexington Avenue has by far much more ridership.

 

Heavily crowded West Side stations (1)(2)(3):

92nd Street

72nd Street

59th Street

50th Street

42nd Street

34th Street

Chambers Street

Park Place

 

Heavily crowded East Side stations (4)(5)(6):

125th Street

86th Street

77th Street

68th Street

59th Street

51st Street

42nd Street

14th Street

Brooklyn Bridge

Fulton Street

Wall Street

Bowling Green

 

Plus the West Side especially the (1) most customers are off the train by 14th. The west village stations don't get a ton of ridership. Even though neither side's local stops south of 14th make the most crowded list, a lot less people use the ones on the lower west side than the lower east

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Lexington Avenue has by far much more ridership.

 

Heavily crowded West Side stations (1)(2)(3):

92nd Street

72nd Street

59th Street

50th Street

42nd Street

34th Street

Chambers Street

Park Place

 

Heavily crowded East Side stations (4)(5)(6):

125th Street

86th Street

77th Street

68th Street

59th Street

51st Street

42nd Street

14th Street

Brooklyn Bridge

Fulton Street

Wall Street

Bowling Green

 

Plus the West Side especially the (1) most customers are off the train by 14th. The west village stations don't get a ton of ridership. Even though neither side's local stops south of 14th make the most crowded list, a lot less people use the ones on the lower west side than the lower east

you forgot the wall st on the west side as well as fulton st those are alway bad in the rush hour i mean wall too wall lol, also you didnt put 14th st

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I think the poster was referencing just the 59-125 stretch on both the lenox and broadway trunks vs the irt. The problems are not similar, but rather unique. The presence of the cpw lines is not to be considered

 

Actually, I was comparing the (1)(2)(3) to the (4)(5)(6) if you wanna put it that way. What do you think as a T/O?

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Well the East Side never got a subway replacement when the Second and Third Avenue Elevated were torn down in the 30's, and 50's. Meanwhile on the West Side the Eighth Avenue Line replaced the Ninth Avenue Elevated, and the Seventh Avenue Line replaced the Seventh Avenue Elevated while the Sixth Avenue Line replace the Sixth Avenue Elevated. Without any replacement lines for the East Side the sole line on the East Side or the Lexington Avenue Line, became crowded. The elevated lines weren't supposed to be torn down anyway. People just thought a subway line would come soon afterward, but construction never truly started till 2008. You can blame that on the auto centric ideas of the 1900's. They were the main reason why the elevated lines were torn down. Let me tell you now. It was extremely stupid for our American ancestors to tear down subway lines, and metro lines when it was mentioned again and again that gasoline and oil was a nonrenewable resource, but the arrogant attitude of Americans persisted.

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Between 59th and 125th, the Lex is used more. The existence of the CPW Line acts as a passenger distribution mechanism, even if the number is heavily skewed toward the IRT. 86th/Lex is the 9th-busiest station in the system.

 

Quick numbers, not counting 59th on both due to transfers:

 

East Side - 70.044m

West Side - 56.268m (66.342m when including the Lenox Avenue Line)

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Here's some numbers of average weekday ridership for each of the stations north of 59th Street and South of, and including, 110th Street.

 

Broadway:

(1) 110th St: 13,116

(1) 103rd St: 12,968

(1)(2)(3) 96th St: 35,053

(1) 86th St: 18,901

(1) 79th St: 15,952

(1)(2)(3) 72nd St: 36,900

(1) 66th St: 21,717

Total: 154,607

 

Lexington Avenue:

(6) 110th St: 11,630

(6) 103rd St: 15,210

(6) 96th St: 24,870

(4)(5)(6) 86th St: 60,965

(6) 77th St: 35,579

(6) 68th St: 34,984

Total: 183,238

 

The majority of the ridership on Lexington Avenue is between 68th and 96th Streets, and the ridership of those stations is greater than the total for the Broadway line between 66th and 110th Streets. Also, keep in mind that there are 7 stations with 2 express on Broadway while there are only 6 stations with 1 express on Lexington Avenue. The express stations on Broadway (72nd and 96th Streets) have ridership levels about the same as 68th Street and 77th Street on Lexington Avenue.

 

Also, I compiled a list of stations on Central Park West from 72nd Street to 110th Street, and surprisingly the total ridership of those stations combined is only 85% of the ridership from 86th Street on Lexington Avenue.

 

(;)(C)

110th St: 6,597

103rd St: 4,782

96th St: 9,037

86th St: 10,572

81st St: 12,374

72nd St: 8,435

Total: 51,797

 

The total ridership on the West Side is greater than the East Side, but in 2010 (the year those statistics are from) a large amount of commuters on the East Side used the M15 Limited and now even more use the M15 Select Bus Service. However on the West Side far less people use the bus as a means of commuting.

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you forgot the wall st on the west side as well as fulton st those are alway bad in the rush hour i mean wall too wall lol, also you didnt put 14th st

 

Not nearly as bad as their counterparts on the east side. Especially during the PM rush. East side, Wall and Fulton are busy all night (especially Fulton).

 

You forgot 103rd St on the (6) thats a populated station on the Lex Local.

 

Busy yes, but not even close to as bad as the other stations that actually made the list.

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I like both lines but obviously the Lexington Avenue Line has more riders hands down. If I wanted to go to Brooklyn during the rush, I often take the Seventh Avenue express since everytime I took the (4) or (5), the trains slow down or get delayed and to avoid the overcrowding on those lines.

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I like both lines but obviously the Lexington Avenue Line has more riders hands down. If I wanted to go to Brooklyn during the rush, I often take the Seventh Avenue express since everytime I took the (4) or (5), the trains slow down or get delayed and to avoid the overcrowding on those lines.

 

(4)(5)(6) are ALWAYS delayed.

 

In the morning going downtown it takes me about 25 minutes on average, but in the afternoon it's only about 15 minutes.

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Whoops there was never a Seventh Avenue Elevated. Guess I shouldn't have rushed back there, but truthfully why tear down an elevated line when a replacment wasn't even in sight?

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Ahem, Seventh ave El?

 

 

 

 

The el's we're torn down becuase they were no longer relivant for what was needed, you're just parinoid that every problem transit has is related to cars. The other thing is people who lived and owned stores along the line wanted it out of the way. not because it was they loved thier cars, but they saw it as in the way of thier lives. heck, it was nothing new, people were calling for them to get pulled down before the IRT even opened;

 

"It may be taken as a settled fact that the problem of rapid transit for this city has not ben solved by the elivated railroads and that these structure cannot be allowed to remain perminatly in the street" -New York Times editorial, 1886.

 

 

.

 

 

 

Now thing that I don't get is why were the Bronx Portion of the IRT are elevated since they hate them so much ? True the Bronx at the time was farmland but photos of the early construction if Westchester IRT line had houses next to them.

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We should have more then one TBM for the Second Avenue Subway as we can see by how long it's taking. The more TBM's digging the tunnels the faster the construction would be, and the faster we would see relief on the Lexington Avenue Line. The US Government should fund mass transit like other nations, and fund mass transit construction equipment like TBM's so we can get things done.

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