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So is it true that all signals with 2 sets (red over red,green over green) etc... Must be manned by a tower or some of them work by themself?

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So is it true that all signals with 2 sets (red over red,green over green) etc... Must be manned by a tower or some of them work by themself?

 

they got this thingy where you press a button and it goes to the thing you want

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So is it true that all signals with 2 sets (red over red,green over green) etc... Must be manned by a tower or some of them work by themself?

 

Those signals are called signals and they are found at interlockings. Some are manned by an actual tower operator who manually establishes a line up for a train. These are towers like 59th St Master Tower, 5th Av, or Jay St. A master tower is a tower that can control a large area of the railroad, unlike a local tower which usually just controls the interlocking that is close by.

 

There are tower though where there are no personal present (usually) like the tower at 47-50th St on the IND. There a T/O will press a button which will request the proper line up for that particular train. In this case "you get what you punch" since it's done by computers. Bergen St on the (F) and (G) is like this too even though it can be "take over" by the tower operator at Jay St.

 

Now this is just a basic explanation of normal signaling, it would take alot to explain CBTC, ATO, and ATS.

 

they got this thingy where you press a button and it goes to the thing you want

 

A first class explanation.......

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Those signals are called signals and they are found at interlockings. Some are manned by an actual tower operator who manually establishes a line up for a train. These are towers like 59th St Master Tower, 5th Av, or Jay St. A master tower is a tower that can control a large area of the railroad, unlike a local tower which usually just controls the interlocking that is close by.

 

There are tower though where there are no personal present (usually) like the tower at 47-50th St on the IND. There a T/O will press a button which will request the proper line up for that particular train. In this case "you get what you punch" since it's done by computers. Bergen St on the (F) and (G) is like this too even though it can be "take over" by the tower operator at Jay St.

 

Now this is just a basic explanation of normal signaling, it would take alot to explain CBTC, ATO, and ATS.

 

 

 

A first class explanation.......

 

I was putting it in laymans terms lol

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A first class explanation.......

 

Thingys are great. They're like doohickys only twice as efficient.

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Thingys are great. They're like doohickys only twice as efficient.

 

Always a sign of an explanation from someone who knows not of what they speak. Oh and a doohicky is nothing without a watch-a-ma-call-it.

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What does a short T/O do when trying to hit one of those punchboxes? I've seen some T/O's that look waay to short, even standing, to reach them.

 

Also, if they hit the wrong line-up, can they just push the other one or does it need to be reset or something like that first?

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What does a short T/O do when trying to hit one of those punchboxes? I've seen some T/O's that look waay to short, even standing, to reach them.

 

Also, if they hit the wrong line-up, can they just push the other one or does it need to be reset or something like that first?

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If this is what I think you have asked, then those buttons are called "route request buttons". Now this is straight from the book.

 

"Many new type interlocking home signals are equipped with route request buttons. These buttons are to be operated by the train operator when the home signal is at danger and no call-on is displayed, or when improper route is displayed. When the button is operated a light goes on over button to show train operator his request has registered in the tower. Towerman acknowledgesthe request by either changing the route or canceling the light over the route request buttons.

 

If a train operator pulls up to a signal indicating a wrong route and operates the route request button and receives no acknowledgement from the towerman, it would be improper for the train operator to accept the route that is set up and report it later at the nearest dispatcher's office."

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What does a short T/O do when trying to hit one of those punchboxes? I've seen some T/O's that look waay to short, even standing, to reach them.

 

Use a shoe paddle.

 

Also, if they hit the wrong line-up, can they just push the other one or does it need to be reset or something like that first?

 

Depends. Some punchboxes have a route cancel option. Manual operated towers, they can get on the radio if need be. However "WHAT YOU PUNCH IS WHAT YOU GET" means just that - so train operators have to be careful they punch for the proper lineup at those locations.

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At the moment all "You get what you punch" locations have cancel features. Also, not every station with punches have punches for every length of train that stops there.

 

Examples: (C) at Chambers n/b and at Spring s/b. In both cases we can punch at Canal. The reasoning for punching the station prior is going north, we wish to sneak in front of the (E) if the machine is on Automatic, which is on whoever gets there first gets the lineup. The (E) punches right at WTC before it leaves the station. Going south, if we miss the 8 car punch box for any reason its a pain in the (you know what) as that whole machine setup puts holding lights on the train until the lineup comes in (would have to key open a door panel to reach it, or if luckily still moving, stop at the 10 for that box). Otherwise the tower operator or terminal td then has to take the machine off automatic and issue you a lineup automatically. The TD also reserves the right to inform RCC about you missing the punch, as its a time-consuming process, especially in rush hour.

 

Another example, that common GO where (E)(M) go on the (F) line, there's no punch for the (M) either at 21-Queensbridge. At Queensbridge we just go to the 10 and tell the c/r to open (there would be no board in front of him, and we usually tell them at Lex or Roosevelt Is so we on the same page, in fact a C/R told me my first time on the (M) by myself for the GO its ok to just aim for the 10 since we MUST punch to get a lineup out the station and few c/r do the idiot thing and close down and pass indication on a red/red home signal they can see.

 

Right now, 47-50th and the Canal interlockings in the IND are the "you get what you punch" spots. At Canal, the tower (which is actually at WTC) is manned so they can change a lineup for you if need be. 47-50 is not (until recently with the constant GO going on in the 53rd line) and there's a big sign indicating that.

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So is it true that all signals with 2 sets (red over red,green over green) etc... Must be manned by a tower or some of them work by themself?

 

Noted by the X on the lower mast, this is an interlocking signal and is never automatic.

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Well, it does act somewhat as an automatic when it is fleeted, meaning set to stay clear on one route. Then, it goes to danger when someone enters the block, and then clears once the block is clear. Approach signals work the same way, though they are more like automatics, in having only the one head, and being keyable.

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Well, it does act somewhat as an automatic when it is fleeted

 

...if you put that as an answer on your signals exam today you'd be denied the T/O position. I know what you mean, though.

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Well, the test isn't asking how it acts, it's likely asking for what it's called, or the category (Interlocking, automatic, etc).

 

Actually, to further answer the OP, there are some small interlockings controlled by towers that are NOT manned. They just remain fleeted. Like York St. for instance. If you hit those, there's no one to give you a call-on, and you have to follow control center's instructions.

Now, with the increase of master towers, those are being eliminated.

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Well, the test isn't asking how it acts, it's likely asking for what it's called, or the category (Interlocking, automatic, etc).

 

Actually, to further answer the OP, there are some small interlockings controlled by towers that are NOT manned. They just remain fleeted. Like York St. for instance. If you hit those, there's no one to give you a call-on, and you have to follow control center's instructions.

Now, with the increase of master towers, those are being eliminated.

 

Really? York isn't controlled by Jay St?

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Nope, it's not. Last year or so they had a single track GO on B2 from York St to Jay St. When a train would come south into York on B1, they had to throw the switch and block and clamp the switches since Jay St can't see what York does and york can't see what Jay does. I think it was only don one weekend then they did something else since it was a really pain in the balls.

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i read that sometime the R train run over the F lines from 36 street queens to rockerfeller center. how is this possible? where are the switches for this R route?

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Guest lance25

From 36 St in Queens, the (R) can switch over to the (F) line tracks and run through the 63rd Street Tunnel, making stops at 21 St-Queensbridge, Roosevelt Island and Lexington Av-63 St. From there, trains can either switch over to the Broadway tail tracks (the ones the (Q) will eventually use to head up to 96 St) and head down to 57 St-7 Av or stay on the Sixth Avenue Line through the Manhattan Bridge.

 

63rd Street Connection, nycsubway.org

detail-63rdconnect.png

 

47th-63rd Streets, nycsubway.org

detail-47-63.png

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Typically, 63rd st switches are used to get onto G3 track as to continue down 6Av would rob Broadway and Lower Manhattan of a local interval. It is considered a wrong route to continue down 6Av tracks after Lex unless specifically told to do so. The blockage that created the reroute in the first place would have been between 36st and 57th street, otherwise they would have sent you normal and run around it if it was further down in Manhattan.

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