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Novabus 5000

What's the difference

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R62 was built by Kawasaki. The R62As are built by Bombardier.

 

The R142s are built by Bombardier. The R142As are built by Kawasaki.

 

The R160As are built by Alstom. The R160Bs are built by Kawasaki.

 

The R29 and R33/36 were built by St Louis Car Co. The R26/28s were built by American Car and Foundry.

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For anyone who gets on the R142 and then the R142A and R142A Supplement, you can tell that they are universes apart from each other. Same thing can not be said about the R62 and its counterparts.

 

You must have a subtle eye to notice these things as they come.

 

Another thing I think the most dominant lines in the IRT ((2)(4)(5)(6)) should have the R142A and R142S and even the R62A. The rest should consist of the R62 and the regular R142's.

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The R-142A's external speakers are narrower than the R-142's.

The R-142A's interior speakers are recessed in a curved portion and the R-142 interior speakers are locaed in the midline of the car.

Thr R-142A's are built by Kawasaki and uses Bombardier AC traction motors while R-142 are built by Bombardier and Alstom AC traction motors.

The LCD destination signs on the R-142's blink off while the R-142A's swtiches.

 

The R-142A is 100% on the (6)<6> while they have some on the (4) and also the (4) uses the R-142S also built by the same company as the R-142A but they are supplements.

 

The R-142's are (2)(4)(5)

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The R-142A's external speakers are narrower than the R-142's.

The R-142A's interior speakers are recessed in a curved portion and the R-142 interior speakers are locaed in the midline of the car.

Thr R-142A's are built by Kawasaki and uses Bombardier AC traction motors while R-142 are built by Bombardier and Alstom AC traction motors.

The LCD destination signs on the R-142's blink off while the R-142A's swtiches.

 

To add to that, the window on the storm door in front of the R142A' cab is smaller and has a thinner border than that on the R142.

The car end bonnets on the R142A are one piece. The bonnets on the R142 are two pieces.

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In addition to the differences mentioned above which most got...

 

Also the R142 and R142A have different motor trucks:

 

R142:

http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?47971

 

R142A:

http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?26953

 

Plus the R142A's also have an extra advertising panel on the interior.

 

Also the R142's HVAC is of a different type than the R142A's...it's much louder than the R142A's

 

As for R62's/R62A's:

R62's are somewhat darker on the interior. R62's have GE propulsion ("woop" noise as train accelerates) where as the R62's have WH which sounds very similar to R32/42/68/68A...

 

Also small exterior difference, the R62 and R62A door sills are very different. Don't have any pics unfortunately since you need to get close to see it, but the R62 door sill is grainy and darker, while the R62A door sill is patterned (diamonds pattern) and lighter. If you want to see this for yourself your best bet is to head over to Broadway, check the door still of a (3) and then a (1) you'll see a difference. (1) runs R62A's...

Edited by SubwayGuy

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In addition, the R62 Rollsigns read like the following: Across

R623.jpg

 

While the R62A reads with 2 levels of writing:

 

DSCN5521.jpg

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Even though there are exceptions with the R62/A rollsigns:

 

R62A 2465 has the across rollsigns (north and south)

 

R62 1590 (IIRC) has the 2 line rollsign (north and south)

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From an operational standpoint , the major difference between R62's and

R62A's is braking ... the way it was explained to me in school car is that the 62's train line brakes apply and release as the T/O apply's and releases them ... with the 62A's they have a component called an 'e-cam' that supposedly causes a slight delay going from car to car upon taking or releasing a brake ... so if a T/O apply's the brakes , then releases and quickly re-applies them , the brakes will still be releasing in some of the cars while the T/O is re-applying brake ... basically , you have to come to a slow stop with the 68A's and once you commit to taking a break , you can't give it up ... you can manipulate the range , but if you are a few feet from the 10 car marker and you fully release it and try and grab it back ... well ... hope you're friends with the conductor , or be prepared to buy him/her a nice lunch that day if they're willing to keep it between the two of you when you put 4 cars out of the station ( just kidding B) - but you could put a door panel out) ... I have found in my opinion that the 62's tend to either have great brakes or sh*t brakes and no in between ... but you will get varying opinions from every/any T/O you ask about that ... hope that helps answer your question ...

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From an operational standpoint , the major difference between R62's and

R62A's is braking ... the way it was explained to me in school car is that the 62's train line brakes apply and release as the T/O apply's and releases them ... with the 62A's they have a component called an 'e-cam' that supposedly causes a slight delay going from car to car upon taking or releasing a brake ... so if a T/O apply's the brakes , then releases and quickly re-applies them , the brakes will still be releasing in some of the cars while the T/O is re-applying brake ... basically , you have to come to a slow stop with the 68A's and once you commit to taking a break , you can't give it up ... you can manipulate the range , but if you are a few feet from the 10 car marker and you fully release it and try and grab it back ... well ... hope you're friends with the conductor , or be prepared to buy him/her a nice lunch that day if they're willing to keep it between the two of you when you put 4 cars out of the station ( just kidding B) - but you could put a door panel out) ... I have found in my opinion that the 62's tend to either have great brakes or sh*t brakes and no in between ... but you will get varying opinions from every/any T/O you ask about that ... hope that helps answer your question ...

 

I agree when i was in the A Div on the (1) and (7) Lines i loved those R62A's.

 

I did operate them on the (5) and (6) Lines as well.

 

You got a train that you can grab 40 lbs doing 35 mph coming into a station and hold it and that train will stop at the 10 car Marker..

 

Then you have trains that you gotta grab 50lbs or 60lbs and hold yer breath...

 

I liked those trains even better than the RedBirds, the R62's,(garbage) or the R142's...

 

Those R68A's i kinda noticed the 5100 series trains are kinda quirky..

 

Thoe low 5000 series brake much better...

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Even though there are exceptions with the R62/A rollsigns:

 

R62A 2465 has the across rollsigns (north and south)

 

R62 1590 (IIRC) has the 2 line rollsign (north and south)

 

Some other R62s with the 2 liners are 1316, 1449 (one side only, forget whether it's the left or right), and 1450.

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