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6 Lexington Ave

FASTRACK Subway Repair Discussion

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MTA New York City Transit is set to introduce FASTRACK--- a new way of working on the rails. Beginning Monday, January 9, the 4, 5 and 6 lines will be shut down from10 p.m. until 5 a.m., suspending all Lexington Avenue Line service between Grand Central-42nd Street and Atlantic Avenue in both directions for four consecutive weeknights.

 

Signals, tracks, tunnels, structures and stations must all be kept in proper working condition, an incredibly difficult task in a system where trains run 24 hours a day, every day. Providing maintenance for over 2,600 switches, 12,000 train control signals, more than 700 miles of track and 468 stations is an enormous challenge. NYC Transit is taking a new approach to the performance of critical maintenance and upgrades. By shutting down a section of a subway line, we can work more efficiently at less cost and provide a much safer environment for our transit workers.

 

System-wide, NYC Transit's weeknight ridership is approximately 250,000. The closures will affect from 10% to 15% of those riders depending on the line segment. While providing a safer work environment for our employees who will no longer be sharing tracks with in-service trains, we also anticipate an annual productivity savings of $10 to $15 million. However, this is not a replacement for weekend work. Most weekend service diversions are due to capital work which consists of major station and line rehabilitation projects, such as the Culver Line reconstruction, the West End Line rehabs, and the rehabilitation of Dyckman Street and Smith-9th Sts. Weekend diversions will continue as before. In order to accomplish our maintenance tasks we have chosen four corridors that begin at Manhattan's Central Business District (CBD):

 

Lexington Avenue 456 from Grand Central-42nd Street to Atlantic Avenue

Sixth Avenue FDB from 59th Street-Columbus Circle to West 4th Street

Seventh Avenue 123 from 34th Street to Atlantic Avenue

Eight Avenue ACE from 59th Street-Columbus Circle to Jay Street-MetroTech

These corridors will completely shut down on four consecutive nights from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m., four times a year. Only subway line segments where there are substantial subway alternatives have been selected for the overnight shutdowns. So, in addition to nearby lines, there may be other lines running that don't usually operate during the late night hours in order to help accommodate customers. In order to avoid further inconvenience, we will avoid other service diversions in the area affected by the closure.

 

By providing a more productive work window, Transit employees will be safer by not working on "live" track and will avoid the interruptions of repeatedly having to "clear up" for trains going by. Workers will inspect track, repair or replace rails, and perform power and signal maintenance. During this time, we will also be able to repair platform edges, wall tiles and lighting in addition to power washing at some of the closed stations.

 

When a line segment is closed at night, customers can expect to add 20 minutes to their usual travel time. Alternative transportation options will be detailed in announcements and posters on trains, in stations and on selected buses; brochures will be available in both English and Spanish. Information will also be available on the web at mta.info | Home Page and through social media, email and text alerts.

 

Our next FASTRACK overnight closure will be on the Seventh Avenue 123 line between 34th Street and Atlantic Avenue from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. for four consecutive nights beginning Monday, February 13 and ending at 5 a.m. Friday, February 17.

 

 

 

(from mta.info)

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Thanks for the heads up- i constantly travel that route at night, now i gotta find alternative route back to fordham road.

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Guest lance25

I merged the previous post with the rest of the "overnight line shutdown" thread since it's the same topic. No sense making a brand new thread with the same information.

 

I love how they're touting this as the best idea ever when they don't even know if it will all work out. I mean yes, there are less passengers on the trains in the middle of the night, but there are still many ways this can fail quite easily. They could be stupid enough to do construction work on the alternative lines (like the (N)/® via the Bridge when there's no (4) service), which would make it a longer and more annoying commute for those affected by this "FastTrack" plan. There's also the problem of what happens if they don't get everything they wanted to get done by the end of the four days. Remember, the idea is to shut down these trunk lines once per quarter, not once a quarter and then several weekends afterwards.

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I love how they're touting this as the best idea ever when they don't even know if it will all work out. I mean yes, there are less passengers on the trains in the middle of the night, but there are still many ways this can fail quite easily. They could be stupid enough to do construction work on the alternative lines (like the (N)/® via the Bridge when there's no (4) service), which would make it a longer and more annoying commute for those affected by this "FastTrack" plan. There's also the problem of what happens if they don't get everything they wanted to get done by the end of the four days. Remember, the idea is to shut down these trunk lines once per quarter, not once a quarter and then several weekends afterwards.

 

Actually, they state that weekend work will continue. Let's just see how this will work out.

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fastrack.jpg

 

FASTRACK begins on Jan 9 – 13 from 10 PM to 5 AM.

Read on for planned service changes

 

(4) No service between Grand Central-42 St and Atlantic Av

Overnight (3) service is extended into Brooklyn (3) trains make all 4 stops between Atlantic Av and New Lots Av

 

(5) Service in Manhattan ends early

Last Manhattan-bound train from E 180 St is 9:37 PM

Last Bronx-bound train from Grand Central-42 St is 10:26 PM

 

(6) No service between Grand Central-42 St and Brooklyn Bridge

 

Service operates as follows:

 

(3) extended to New Lots Av

(4)(6) runs local between Grand Central-42 St and the Bronx

(5) runs in the Bronx between E 180 St and Dyre Av all night

(S) 42 St Shuttle runs overnight

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The MTA summarized the work that was done last night:

 

FASTRACK, our new comprehensive program to inspect, maintain, and upgrade stations, tracks and signals in less time, at less cost began last night. Over 700 transit employees worked on the closed section of the Lexington Avenue line. Here’s what we accomplished:

 

We began a comprehensive inspection and review of signals and track switches along the closed section of track. Testing of the signal switches and performing maintenance is routinely done every month, an activity that normally takes 10 days to perform. Last evening, over 50% of the signal inspections were completed.

 

The Track Division inspected and performed maintenance on 3rd Rail components at several locations, ensuring the efficient distribution of DC traction power to trains along the corridor.

 

We replaced running rails north of Fulton Street and Brooklyn Bridge, and replaced tie plates at five stations. The wear and tear of thousands of subway cars over the tracks requires regular replacement of plates, blocks and track; these new replacement plates are made of a material that helps give customers a quieter, smoother ride.

 

Over 5,000 feet of track covering 14 stations was cleaned and scraped, removing mud and muck from the track bed helping keep signals reliable and service running smoothly.

 

The Wall St station was power washed last evening and we painted approximately 3,800 linear feet of platform edges. At the 23rd St station, new lighting fixtures and bulbs were installed and all existing lighting fixtures were cleaned.

 

We replaced missing floor tiles at four stations, chipped and replaced broken steps on 16 stairways and scraped peeling paint from above the track roadbed paint at three stations. We also removed trash from 15 stations.

Survey work for future capital construction was also performed last night.

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I have to say, this FastTrack thing is a superb idea. Finally the MTA lending credence to the word "efficiency".

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Service-wise, it didn't work out too well.

 

Maintenance wise, it worked out like it was supposed too. Johnson and Gall were very happy with the way it went. As for service, I was out there last night from 1 to 4 and there were no problems on the IRT. Tonight was a bit different with a police action in Brooklyn that suspended (3) for a while.

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Care to elaborate?

 

Grand Central couldn't turn back all of the (4) and (6) trains, so some had to be turned back at 149th Street/Grand Concourse (on the (4)) or 138th Street/3rd Avenue (on the (6))

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Grand Central couldn't turn back all of the (4) and (6) trains, so some had to be turned back at 149th Street/Grand Concourse (on the (4)) or 138th Street/3rd Avenue (on the (6))

 

Looking at the track map I can see why. I wonder how they're going to do the 7th Ave line fast track.

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Mkay I got caught up in the turn-arounds at Grand Central tonight. I missed my train at GCT because the darned (4) and (6) trains couldn't turn around fast enough. *sigh* It got me home an hour later than I should have.

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Looking at the track map I can see why. I wonder how they're going to do the 7th Ave line fast track.

They should turn back the (2) trains at 96 Street, and terminate the (1) trains at Times Square or 34 Street. Between Times Square and 34 Street, there's effectively one track to turn around trains. At least Grand Central has two.

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Maintenance wise, it worked out like it was supposed too. Johnson and Gall were very happy with the way it went. As for service, I was out there last night from 1 to 4 and there were no problems on the IRT. Tonight was a bit different with a police action in Brooklyn that suspended (3) for a while.

 

mta.info | Fastrack Update

 

Track – removed 20,140 pounds of debris, scraped and cleaned a total of 19,770 feet of track, replaced 42 tie blocks, installed 1,005 plates, installed 1,615 friction pads, replaced 25 sections of rails, replaced track switch;

Third Rail Operations - cleared 1,685 identified defects, scraped and cleaned 4,900 feet of track under and around the third rail;

Signals – first of the month inspection performed on 311 locations, serviced 14 switch machines, tested 63 timer relays, cleared five electrical grounding conditions;

Power- inspected 55 manholes for faults, installed 866 feet of new communication cable;

Infrastructure- Four stations were sounded and tapped for loose concrete, cleaned drains at eight stations, grouted leaks at 10 locations;

Elevators & Escalators- cleared 86 elevator and escalator defects, replaced 23 escalator steps at three stations;

Electronics Maintenance Division- tested and inspected 167 emergency alarm/emergency telephones, inspected eight escalator fire suppression systems, inspected 12 platform edge CCTV’s and replaced monitors and cameras as needed;

Maintenance of Way Engineering - wired and cut in five control line/key by locations;

Station Environment - repaired and installed new lighting at five stations, replaced 2,217 bulbs, replaced missing/damaged floor tiles at four stations, scraped 29,150 square feet, primed 12,650 square feet, and painted 17,650 square feet of platform and track ceilings, repaired broken steps at 15 stations, cleaned and sanitized 15 stations with mobile wash, baited and removed garbage from refuse rooms at 15 stations, replaced 43 platform edge signs at nine stations, replaced 2,172 bulbs in tunnels; painted stairway copings and railings at seven stations.

 

Next board meeting is the week after next: a report will be submitted and I can't wait to see it!

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In London in the UK sections of he underground are shut most weekends, ranging form lightly used sections out the countryside (Loughton - Epping on the Central line must be 15 miles from Central London) to section of line in the centre of London. Transport for London try to co-ordinate closures so that parallel routes are not shut at the same time, but London doesn't have the luxury of being able to divert services down another line in most cases.

 

The London Underground is also shut from 01:00 - 05:00 most morning but to do the big works they have to take weekend possessions and put buses on instead. This does have the benefit of be able to blitz the work and do far more in one 52 hour block than can be done in one four hour block. Remember the last train has to run, everyone be satisfied everyone is clear, switch the current off, put on protection (just in case a train routes through), do the work, get everyone off the track, safety checks, turn the current back on, hand the line back to operations and trains can run. Actually working time is much less than 4 hours.

 

Bus operators love it, it's a huge business laying on replacement buses.

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I simply think that it is absurd to close a whole segment of a line if you have the luck to have 4 tracks !!!! Red line ( 15 minutes overnight ) and Blue line ( 30 minutes by 1.30 AM to 3.00 AM ) in Chicago have ALWAYS at least 1 track in service !!! Does know the MTA that NY is the city that never sleeps ?

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I simply think that it is absurd to close a whole segment of a line if you have the luck to have 4 tracks !!!! Red line ( 15 minutes overnight ) and Blue line ( 30 minutes by 1.30 AM to 3.00 AM ) in Chicago have ALWAYS at least 1 track in service !!! Does know the MTA that NY is the city that never sleeps ?

 

I think it's absurd that people are reacting as if the entire subway is shutting down, and that there isn't another station usually 1 - 3 blocks away.

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I simply think that it is absurd to close a whole segment of a line if you have the luck to have 4 tracks !!!! Red line ( 15 minutes overnight ) and Blue line ( 30 minutes by 1.30 AM to 3.00 AM ) in Chicago have ALWAYS at least 1 track in service !!! Does know the MTA that NY is the city that never sleeps ?

 

I think it's absurd to maintain the subway in a proper manner and not let the system deteriorate.

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I simply think that it is absurd to close a whole segment of a line if you have the luck to have 4 tracks !!!! Red line ( 15 minutes overnight ) and Blue line ( 30 minutes by 1.30 AM to 3.00 AM ) in Chicago have ALWAYS at least 1 track in service !!! Does know the MTA that NY is the city that never sleeps ?

 

I'll give you the benifit of doubt and say that you have no idea what goes into subway maintinance because if you did, you would know that this program is the best thing to happen in years.

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I'll give you the benifit of doubt and say that you have no idea what goes into subway maintinance because if you did, you would know that this program is the best thing to happen in years.

 

Absolutely!

 

It's clearly obvious this shutdown was necessary, and especially south of 28th Street you do have nearby options for travel if you normally use the (4)/ (5)/ (6). The only people really adversely affected by this particular shutdown were those who use the 33rd Street station because they had to walk or take the (M34) to get to Broadway-6th Avenue.

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Absolutely!

 

It's clearly obvious this shutdown was necessary, and especially south of 28th Street you do have nearby options for travel if you normally use the (4)/(5)/(6). The only people really adversely affected by this particular shutdown were those who use the 33rd Street station because they had to walk or take the (M34) to get to Broadway-6th Avenue.

 

Yeah about that. The problem with that is the M34/A stops running after midnight (the last M34A out of Waterside is around 12;10 am) so within that whole 2 hour timeframe, you had the bus and at that time,s there's only 1 bus on the road so you would be better walking in the first place

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I don't really see why Any (4)(5)(6) passengers that switched to the bus, I can't necessarily see them switching to the M15 unless they're going below 8th St.

 

Between 116th St and 8th St, the M101/M102/M103 combined overnight is every 20 minutes while the M15 is every half hour the whole route.

 

The M103 below 8th St is only every hour, so the M15 is generally the better option, but between Fulton St and Astor Pl the 103 stops closer to the (6) then the M15. Ignoring being twice as frequent then the M103, the M15 would arguably only be useful for traveling to Wall St and Bowling Green, the M103 covers Fulton St and above.

 

I would imagine that the Broadway Line and the crosstown subways to the (2) and (3) would absorb any significant portion of the Lex Av ridership.

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That makes sense:

 

Between the (N)/® at 59th-60th Street and again from 28th Street southward all the way to Atlantic-Pacific in Brooklyn (plus the (Q) at 14th, Canal, DeKalb and Atlantic-Pacific), the (F) at 63rd and Broadway-Lafayette (which covers Bleecker) in Manhattan and Jay Street-Metrotech in Brooklyn (where you can switch to the (N)/®), the (E) at 51st-53rd Street/Lexington and the (S) and (7) at Grand Central to the (1)/ (2) at Times Square and also the (2) at Park Place, Fulton and Wall Streets in Manhattan and Court, Nevins and Atlantic-Pacific in Brooklyn, just about every station on the (4)/ (5)/ (6) affected by the shutdown was covered by another train and sometimes more than one train, including in some cases those that stopped where there is a transfer to the (4)/ (5)/ (6) normally. As noted, the only people adversely effected were specifically those who needed the 33rd Street station and to a lesser degree 28th Street.

 

I can see where except for those who specifically needed 28th or 33rd Street and maybe 23rd Street on the (4)/ (5)/ (6) using buses to get to where they were going. Otherwise, it was not necessary.

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