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6 Lexington Ave

My own "survey" on disruptions...

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So, this is a highly unofficial "survey" I conducted from 9/1/2011 to 12/31/2011. The source for this survey are the emails I received from the (MTA) regarding service changes and delays. Through this "survey", what I tried to do is check what sort of problem delays or disrupts subway service more often, which subway lines are affected more and which less.

I understand that this kind of observation has severe shortcomings, but ultimately, I believe it can shed some light on what impacts good service and which lines fare better/worse.

 

During the period I mentioned, according to the (MTA), subway service was disrupted or delayed a total of 890 times.

The most usual problem, which delayed or disrupted subway service was signal problems. About 23% of the disruptions were caused by signal problems.

Mechanical problems are next, with a percentage of about 22-23%.

Police investigations: approx. 14%

Sick passengers: approx. 11.5%

Switch problems: approx. 10%

Rail conditions: approx. 6.5%

Unplanned/emergency work: approx. 5%

Smoke conditions: approx. 4.5%

Debris on tracks: approx. 1.2%

Water conditions and power outages: less than 1%

There was also a derailment.

 

As far as which lines fared better, this is even less accurate, as a disruption on one line can affect others, but you might still want to take a look..

From the worst to the best the lines rank as follows: (4), (2), (A), (N), (F), (6), (R), (Q), (D), (5), (3), (E), (7), (C), (:), (1), (M), (L), (J), (G), (Z). (S) (worst to best): Rockaway Park, Franklin Avenue, 42nd Street.

I hope you find this interesting.

Edited by 6 Lexington Ave

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Notice how the lines that are longer and make more stops are at the bottom of the pool and the shorter and less frequent ones are at the top of the list

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There was also a derailment.

 

Sorry to be Mr. Perfect, but there were actually 2 derailments. :o yup, surprise, surprise!

 

One was on the (D) or (N) express track, at DeKalb Ave, & the other, I'm pretty sure "6 Lexington Ave" can answer that. ;)

 

 

And thank you for the survey, of the malfunctions in the system! :)

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Sorry to be Mr. Perfect, but there were actually 2 derailments. :o yup, surprise, surprise!

 

One was on the (D) or (N) express track, at DeKalb Ave, & the other, I'm pretty sure "6 Lexington Ave" can answer that. ;)

 

 

And thank you for the survey, of the malfunctions in the system! :)

 

You're welcome!

No, there was only one derailment reported in the corresponding period (9/1/2011 to 12/31/2011). The one at DeKalb was earlier in the year.

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It's no surprise the (Z) was best. How many disruptions did it actually hav?

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Notice how the lines that are longer and make more stops are at the bottom of the pool and the shorter and less frequent ones are at the top of the list

 

Actually, the (A) was very high up on the list, as was the (F). I wonder how those lines will compare over the coming winter months, since they have significant outdoor portions of trackage.

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One flaw with this though is that it will necessarily miss a lot of things. Customers interfere with doors frequently causing trains to be late. Those trains then get skips which inconveniences a number of customers to keep the trains on times.

 

Overnight, there are homeless people outstretched everywhere on trains...some on benches, some on the floor. When they're on the floor, this often causes a delay on a departing train while police, or EMS respond. No email or service alert will be generated because with the trains running every 20 minutes, only the one train is affected, but it does affect all the people on that train and waiting for that train.

 

Customers actually cause the majority of the delays on the subway. Sick passengers are only one type of delay. Also remember that most police investigations are customer related - someone doing something they're not supposed to that has caused the cops to come in - armed person in the system, someone on the tracks walking around, etc.

 

I do agree that among issues with the system and its infrastructure, signal problems rank the highest, followed by emergency track repair and/or switch problems.

 

The list is a good starting point, but remember many of the service advisories are just an oversimplification for the public and don't tell the full story of who's "to blame" so to speak for the service change.

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One flaw with this though is that it will necessarily miss a lot of things. Customers interfere with doors frequently causing trains to be late. Those trains then get skips which inconveniences a number of customers to keep the trains on times.

 

Overnight, there are homeless people outstretched everywhere on trains...some on benches, some on the floor. When they're on the floor, this often causes a delay on a departing train while police, or EMS respond. No email or service alert will be generated because with the trains running every 20 minutes, only the one train is affected, but it does affect all the people on that train and waiting for that train.

 

Customers actually cause the majority of the delays on the subway. Sick passengers are only one type of delay. Also remember that most police investigations are customer related - someone doing something they're not supposed to that has caused the cops to come in - armed person in the system, someone on the tracks walking around, etc.

 

I do agree that among issues with the system and its infrastructure, signal problems rank the highest, followed by emergency track repair and/or switch problems.

 

The list is a good starting point, but remember many of the service advisories are just an oversimplification for the public and don't tell the full story of who's "to blame" so to speak for the service change.

I agree. That's why I said this "survey" is severely flawed.

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"During the period I mentioned, according to the , subway service was disrupted or delayed a total of 890 times.

The most usual problem, which delayed or disrupted subway service was signal problems. About 23% of the disruptions were caused by signal problems."

Ok 890 times plus or minus. To me that is not bad considering the amount of people a day, trains a day, and the total distance a day and a year covered by the MTA. Pretty impressive to me.

 

No disruptions for me on my commute, but 300 miles a week just to get to work really sucks, times 50 weeks a year= 15,000 miles a year just to got to work:confused: Need to move closer.

 

Folks in NYC are lucky in the aspect that they have a subway, and the best mass trasit system in the US.

 

No bus here either. Thanks for the post:tup:

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