Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.
Sign in to follow this  
Shortline Bus

SLOWDOWN! Transport Workers Union flyer urges ‘extra care’ at stations

Recommended Posts

 

 

 

 

 

"WITH CONTRACT talks at a standstill, the transit workers union is expected to start suggesting that subway motormen slow down their trains.

 

Transport Workers Union Local 100 has drafted a flyer telling train operators to use “extra care” when entering stations to avoid hitting anyone who might wind up on the tracks.

 

The stated goal is to prevent some of the all-too common deaths that happen when people fall or jump from platforms.

 

The flyer cites a particularly deadly weekend this month when three people were killed in separate incidents by trains roaring into stations. A fourth was killed walking along tracks in between stations.

 

The safety tips come as Local 100 leaders have become increasingly frustrated by what they perceive as the MTA’s unfair and inflexible demands.

 

Under the state’s Taylor Law, it is illegal for public transit workers in New York to even plan a strike or a work slowdown. Those tactics can lead to fines against workers and the union."

 

 

 

SLOWDOWN!*Transport Workers Union flyer urges

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is called natural selection. If you are stupid enough to get in the way of a train with a combined weight of over 500,000 lbs, then you will be selected out of the gene pool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It is called natural selection. If you are stupid enough to get in the way of a train with a combined weight of over 500,000 lbs, then you will be selected out of the gene pool.

 

Not everyone who ends up on the tracks chooses to be on them....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest lance25

You're right Dante, but I don't think the entire system needs to be slowed down because of the relatively few people who do end up on the tracks. It is unfortunate when people wind up there by accident, but it doesn't mean everyone should suffer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You're right Dante, but I don't think the entire system needs to be slowed down because of the relatively few people who do end up on the tracks. It is unfortunate when people wind up there by accident, but it doesn't mean everyone should suffer.

 

I actually agree with you 100%. The only resaon they are talking about slowing the trains down is for political reasons as the contract talks have stalled. Yes it is unfortunate, and 99% of the time it's the persons fault.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I actually agree with you 100%. The only resaon they are talking about slowing the trains down is for political reasons as the contract talks have stalled. Yes it is unfortunate, and 99% of the time it's the persons fault.

 

This skreed isn't specifically directed at all rank and file TWU members:

 

Funny how "safety" becomes a pressing concern only during contract negotiations. Once a new contract is ratified, these "safety" precautions (read extortion tactics) will be ignored/forgotten until the expiration of the new agreement. Then, almost miraculously, the issue of "safety" rises from the ashes yet again. Keep up the strongarm tactics and don't be surprised if, at some point in the near future, your leadership gets indicted under the RICO statutes.

 

Read the following and ponder what is written in the article:

 

Close the door on public-sector unions

 

It's also unfortunate that these negotiations are about money that doesn't belong to either the unions or government. As the article makes clear, private sector unions engage in negotiations with private business entities in order to share in the profits generated by these companies. Government doesn't exist, or provide services, to generate profits. Whatever financial demands made by public service unions are paid by us, the taxpaying public, the real bosses. That said, you should start showing some semblance of appreciation toward your benefactors. ;)

 

I've been a union member in the private sector; what we ask for in negotiations doesn't have a financial impact affecting all aspects of society. What government unions do is tantamount to sticking their hands in the taxpayer's pocket and helping themselves to what the taxpayer earned; and, the taxpayer has no say as to how his money will be spent. One important point to consider is that no one is indispensible. Anyone can and will be replaced. There's always someone with a GED waiting to take your job when the opportunity presents itself.

 

 

My two cents as a taxpayer/funding source for government entitlements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before the flame war erupts about "slowdowns" and safety issues let's get one thing perfectly clear. Perhaps the general public only hears about safety around contract time but in RTO, and probably Surface, the word "safety" is drummed into your head from Day One. 24/7/365. By management and the union. In the subway forums there are threads on timers, etc., slowing down people's daily commutes. Those timers were installed by management for "safety" reasons. The easiest way to lose one's job with any part of the operations divisions in the (MTA) (subways, buses, railroads),is to violate a rule concerning safety. The implication that someone is advocating a "slowdown" by operating safely is laughable IMO. It may sell newspapers but it's pure BS. Now thats my rant, coming from a retiree and taxpayer for almost fifty years. Carry on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Before the flame war erupts about "slowdowns" and safety issues let's get one thing perfectly clear. Perhaps the general public only hears about safety around contract time but in RTO, and probably Surface, the word "safety" is drummed into your head from Day One. 24/7/365. By management and the union. In the subway forums there are threads on timers, etc., slowing down people's daily commutes. Those timers were installed by management for "safety" reasons. The easiest way to lose one's job with any part of the operations divisions in the (MTA) (subways, buses, railroads),is to violate a rule concerning safety. The implication that someone is advocating a "slowdown" by operating safely is laughable IMO. It may sell newspapers but it's pure BS. Now thats my rant, coming from a retiree and taxpayer for almost fifty years. Carry on.

 

There's three different versions to every story:

 

1. Yours (meaning the TWU)

2. Theirs (the media's)

3. The truth, which is what you won't get from either of the above

 

I'm not in any doubt about the safety protocols in place and required to be followed. I question the union leadership's credibility in claiming that this is in response to the most recent incidents. If any entity is at fault, it would be the leadership of the TWU for the timing of ths notice. Let's call it what it really is: a not so subtly worded call for a work slowdown. You can parse it any way you like; it is what it is. This comes across more like trying to tighten the screws and forcing a contract agreement. It's reeks of psychological warfare because the system-wide slowdowns, in the name of "safety" of course, will cause discontent among the transit riding public. That discontent translates into angry phone calls and emails to the politicos (representing the irate masses), who then use their offices to expedite negotiations (already a month and a half past the expiration of the last contract. I smell desperation on the part of the current TWU leadership and their facing the very real possibility of getting voted out at the next election) , even if the result is not favorable to the MTA and the Corporation of the City of New York. Unlike career civil servants, politicians can lose their jobs, courtesy of the voting booth.

 

I'm happy that you have such a great appreciation of humor. For some unexplained reason, every public employee and his brother thinks that the average "civilian" (I love the way that term is used by city employees in order to seperate themselves from the rest of the lumpen) is incapable of comprehending how things work. Newsflash! We do and don't like it. The ones who pay your salaries are getting fed up being used as pawns everytime your representatives go to the bargaining table. You might get some, or all, of what you wanted; but, the taxpayer gets stuck with the bill in the end.

 

Care to discuss the points raised in that article? ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's three different versions to every story:

 

1. Yours (meaning the TWU)

2. Theirs (the media's)

3. The truth, which is what you won't get from either of the above

 

I'm not in any doubt about the safety protocols in place and required to be followed. I question the union leadership's credibility in claiming that this is in response to the most recent incidents. If any entity is at fault, it would be the leadership of the TWU for the timing of ths notice. Let's call it what it really is: a not so subtly worded call for a work slowdown. You can parse it any way you like; it is what it is. This comes across more like trying to tighten the screws and forcing a contract agreement. It's reeks of psychological warfare because the system-wide slowdowns, in the name of "safety" of course, will cause discontent among the transit riding public. That discontent translates into angry phone calls and emails to the politicos (representing the irate masses), who then use their offices to expedite negotiations (already a month and a half past the expiration of the last contract. I smell desperation on the part of the current TWU leadership and their facing the very real possibility of getting voted out at the next election) , even if the result is not favorable to the MTA and the Corporation of the City of New York. Unlike career civil servants, politicians can lose their jobs, courtesy of the voting booth.

 

I'm happy that you have such a great appreciation of humor. For some unexplained reason, every public employee and his brother thinks that the average "civilian" (I love the way that term is used by city employees in order to seperate themselves from the rest of the lumpen) is incapable of comprehending how things work. Newsflash! We do and don't like it. The ones who pay your salaries are getting fed up being used as pawns everytime your representatives go to the bargaining table. You might get some, or all, of what you wanted; but, the taxpayer gets stuck with the bill in the end.

 

Care to discuss the points raised in that article? ;)

 

How cold blooded can you be? This could save someones life. I guess it OK to kill people all in the name of getting home with in 45mins you normal do. I know at any job that i worked in the past if something usual occurred dealing with injuries or death there was a notice and possible a meeting on the topic of how we could prevent the problem from happening again. There should have been something post by management to tell the T/O to slow down but no dice, they could care less about you or anyone else as long as the trains are on time. Shame on the Union for being concerned for human lives, shame on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe its time to install platform edge doors like they use on parts of the Tokyo and other Asian cities to prevent suicides...which are very common over there. They would go well with the CTBC system...

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe its time to install platform edge doors like they use on parts of the Tokyo and other Asian cities to prevent suicides...which are very common over there. They would go well with the CTBC system...

There are many reasons why this can't be done in NYC. Some of them include:

1. The current financial condition of the (MTA).

2. The non-uniformity of the subway car fleet.

3. The fact that only the Canarsie line has CBTC and it will be very long until the rest of the system gets it, if that ever happens.

I'm sure there are other issues too...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How cold blooded can you be? This could save someones life. I guess it OK to kill people all in the name of getting home with in 45mins you normal do. I know at any job that i worked in the past if something usual occurred dealing with injuries or death there was a notice and possible a meeting on the topic of how we could prevent the problem from happening again. There should have been something post by management to tell the T/O to slow down but no dice, they could care less about you or anyone else as long as the trains are on time. Shame on the Union for being concerned for human lives, shame on them.

 

Would you care to dispute anything I wrote? I have a reputation in RL as a person who speaks his mind. Sometimes, that trait is not appreciated by those who wish to hear nothing but sugar coated platitides designed not to offend the sensibilities of the listener. This is a board dedicated to the honest discussion of the various aspects of public transportation, good and bad. I seriously doubt that the creators' intent was to set up some kind mutual ass kissing society. If you think that I'm being cold-blooded by actually pointing out tactics which have been used by the TWU, and other municipal unions, during past contract negotiations, you're either naive and/or delusional. Don't you find it a bit odd that the TWU braintrust waited until now to remind its rank and file of its obligation to "safety", a subject that, in the paraphrased words of another poster, is drummed into their skulls 24/7/365? Even after these accidents made the papers, I saw, and still do, observe trains pulling into stations at the normal rate of speed. Who's kidding whom? So, what I gather from you, and anyone else who chooses to defend the TWU's obviously transparent call for a work slowdown, is that the folks operating the trains aren't smart enough to implement MTA-mandated safety protocols on their own. Instead, they have to rely on a notice issued by the union leadership which reminds them of this often repeated obligation. A notice which, coincidentally, is issued during a deadlock in contract negotiations. Is that what you're intimating?

 

Don't even try to play the "troll" card. I've raised valid questions about the timing and purpose of this notice. If you insist on going that route, you'll only show me, and anyone else reading this thread, that you are incapable of defending the TWU's action in a coherent and legitimate manner. Name calling is the last resort of those who can't defend their position in an arguement/debate and is used to put the other party on the defensive by forcing them to deny any spurious accusations; thereby, diverting focus away from the original talking point. The ball's in your court, bubby.

 

P.S.

 

I have more than a few friends working for the MTA; and, to a person, they have told me on numerous occasions that anytime the union calls for surface and underground operators to follow the rules "by the book", that's nothing more than a euphemism for "slowdown". I guess that disclosing such things would result in their being ostracized from transit employee social circles if their identities were made public.

Edited by Joe From Greenpernt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you were to walk around my crew room or any other in the system you would see plenty of notices to slow down or not text message ect... from both parties union and management. I'm not naive to the fact of the TWU leadership releasing posters to slow down for the reason you mentioned and for the SAFETY of the riding public. RTO had a bloody week down in the tunnels, what wrong with reminding the work force to do there job the right way. Every union I have been in the private or public sector has told me I'm wrong if I was wrong. Let me ask you this, what happens when tonight on the 5 o'clock news you hear that a train stopped within inches of a elderly man who was having a heart attack and fell off the platform? Maybe, just maybe that flyer might have saved his life. Maybe that operator used his training and remembered that the speed limit is 10mph instead of 20mph when entering a station which everyone does as long as they stop on there mark.

 

P.S if the rules were followed everyday the system would collapse as we know it. 20% of buses would not pull out, almost every bus in the system would be running behind schedule, massive over crowding and so on. Both parties look the other way to better serve the public, and only go after people when there is total disregards of the rule.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you were to walk around my crew room or any other in the system you would see plenty of notices to slow down or not text message ect... from both parties union and management. I'm not naive to the fact of the TWU leadership releasing posters to slow down for the reason you mentioned and for the SAFETY of the riding public. RTO had a bloody week down in the tunnels, what wrong with reminding the work force to do there job the right way. Every union I have been in the private or public sector has told me I'm wrong if I was wrong. Let me ask you this, what happens when tonight on the 5 o'clock news you hear that a train stopped within inches of a elderly man who was having a heart attack and fell off the platform? Maybe, just maybe that flyer might have saved his life. Maybe that operator used his training and remembered that the speed limit is 10mph instead of 20mph when entering a station which everyone does as long as they stop on there mark.

 

P.S if the rules were followed everyday the system would collapse as we know it. 20% of buses would not pull out, almost every bus in the system would be running behind schedule, massive over crowding and so on. Both parties look the other way to better serve the public, and only go after people when there is total disregards of the rule.

 

You made a case for my arguement. The TWU is well aware of the consequences of calling on its membership to follow the book to a tee. It goes back to my original point that this is TWU's way of showing everyone they have "juice". Issuing this notice while contract negotiations are in a stalemate only reinforces any suspicions one might have regarding the TWU's intentions. Going in a complete circle, if these safety procedures are repeated at every moment during a work shift, why was it necessary for the TWU to issue a reminder? I'll give the workers the benefit of doubt and believe that they're not all afflicted with short term memory. Even my cat remembers something if it has an impact on his well being.

 

Re the elderly man story, I don't deal in hypotheticals. One can drag out all the "What ifs" and incorporate them into whatever scenario one wishes. In the end, they are still hypothetical.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you read my first sentence in my last post you will see that both sides actively post reminders to it workers on safety. While you see only one poster that been put up after the end of our contract, I have seen 50 in the past 3 year when we were under contract. You have selective reasoning. You see the poster as juice for the TWU I see it as a reminder to do the right thing while working. It sad to say but the MTA’s workforce is not a perfect one. Drilling home safety is a must. A person at their cubical does have a direct effect on people’s lives during their work day. They don’t drive 20 ton vehicles with 70 people on board or Have 8 train cars weighting 340 tons with up to 2000 people on board during peak hours. So I welcome a poster by The TWU or the MTA to remind us to be safe even if it may be seen as controversial. If it saves ones person’s life while delaying everyone’s by tens minutes, so be it. You know what funny that hypothetical scenario I mentioned has actual happen, but we need to disregard it since it doesn’t fit your argument points. Why is it you don’t mention that this poster was released after 4 deaths in the subway system?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's three different versions to every story:

 

1. Yours (meaning the TWU)

2. Theirs (the media's)

3. The truth, which is what you won't get from either of the above

 

I'm not in any doubt about the safety protocols in place and required to be followed. I question the union leadership's credibility in claiming that this is in response to the most recent incidents. If any entity is at fault, it would be the leadership of the TWU for the timing of ths notice. Let's call it what it really is: a not so subtly worded call for a work slowdown. You can parse it any way you like; it is what it is. This comes across more like trying to tighten the screws and forcing a contract agreement. It's reeks of psychological warfare because the system-wide slowdowns, in the name of "safety" of course, will cause discontent among the transit riding public. That discontent translates into angry phone calls and emails to the politicos (representing the irate masses), who then use their offices to expedite negotiations (already a month and a half past the expiration of the last contract. I smell desperation on the part of the current TWU leadership and their facing the very real possibility of getting voted out at the next election) , even if the result is not favorable to the MTA and the Corporation of the City of New York. Unlike career civil servants, politicians can lose their jobs, courtesy of the voting booth.

 

I'm happy that you have such a great appreciation of humor. For some unexplained reason, every public employee and his brother thinks that the average "civilian" (I love the way that term is used by city employees in order to seperate themselves from the rest of the lumpen) is incapable of comprehending how things work. Newsflash! We do and don't like it. The ones who pay your salaries are getting fed up being used as pawns everytime your representatives go to the bargaining table. You might get some, or all, of what you wanted; but, the taxpayer gets stuck with the bill in the end.

 

Care to discuss the points raised in that article? :(

 

I've read the story you linked to in your post and it might shock you that I agree with some of the authors points. I do disagree with some of the remedies proposed in the piece. I was a civil servant. I am still a taxpayer and was before going into civil service. Last time I looked civil servants were taxpayers, too. Before I myself would demonize any class of people for advocating for any type of salary increase or enhanced benefits I'd take a step back and look at the whole picture. You, I, and the author, looked at that picture and saw that the practices he mentioned were unsustainable over the long run for the taxpayers. Guess what. I agree with that conclusion. Where I part company with the author's opinion and ,it appears, yours is in the conclusion he drew. I would never propose disenfranchising ANY group of people from organizing and bargaining collectively in either the public or private sector. As a Black man who grew up in the Civil Rights era I can't support anything that reeks with the stench of disenfranchising anyone, for whatever purpose. That being said the article correctly points to the villains in the whole chain but incorrectly paints the picture. It is stated(correctly) that the taxpayers, including those who are civil servants, are left footing the bill. It also states(incorrectly IMO) that the taxpayers aren't represented at the negotiating table. With whom are civil servants bargaining with? Themselves? Nope. They are negotiating with, directly or indirectly, representatives or agents of those the TAXPAYER voted for. In the case of the TWU vs MTA- NYCT the union is bargaining with people appointed by the very politicians the public elected in the first place. The taxpayers in the (MTA) region are fed up and rightfully so IMO yet I think the public's anger is mis-directed by the media in many cases. Part of the reason the (MTA) was formed in the first place was so the public's anger and complaints wouldn't be directed at the politicians and it seems to have worked. The (MTA) is OZ but your elected officials are the people behind the curtain. Don't overlook that the next time you step into the election booth. Two quick points for you, Joe, and the floor is yours people. One is your flippant remark about the truth. I speak for myself, not Local 100. We are not one and the same and if you happened to look over my posts through the years even Stevie Wonder could see that. I say what I perceive to be the truth. I'm a man, not a parrot. The second point goes toward your remark about the union advocating a "slowdown". I've worked for Transit, NY Telephone, USPS, and non-profits in my working career. I don't know your personal history but in all the places I've named that flyer simply means follow rule # 1. CYA. That's my opinion. Carry on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's some coverage from SecondAvenueSagas.com:

‘Slowdown’ on tap as labor talks resume

 

This morning, it took my 4 train a whopping ten minutes to go from 14th St. to 42nd St., and as the announcements kept blaring about “train traffic ahead of us,” my mind wandered to this Daily News article. In the wake of a series of gruesome deaths a few weeks ago, the TWU has told its train drivers to “use extra care” when entering stations due to safety concerns. It’s a perfectly legal move employed during labor negotiations that tend to drive straphangers nuts.

 

Meanwhile, after two weeks of stewing over “bad faith negotiations” brought about when the TWU objected to an apparent leak of the MTA’s demands, the two sides will resume formal talks on Thursday. While the TWU’s outrage over the MTA’s supposed negotiating tactics has stalled forward progress, MTA Chairman Joseph Lhota says that he and TWU president John Samuelsen have maintained an open line of communication over the past few weeks. A deal though is still not on the horizon, but neither is a strike.

 

For a full glimpse at the MTA’s demands, check out this pdf. They range from benefit reductions to operational improvements, but OPTO, sadly, is not among them.

Source: ‘Slowdown’ on tap as labor talks resume :: Second Ave. Sagas

 

Below that, there's another comment about slowdowns:

Tonight while coming back from class, my 4 train went maddeningly slow between 125 and 86. A 5 definitely wasn’t in front of it, because I waited almost 10 minutes at 125 with nothing showing up. During the crawl, the train was incessantly honking its horn. Maybe there were crews on the track, or maybe it was the sound of the union beginning to roar. I guess I’ll never really know.

 

I've only taken the (Q) from Coney Island to Sheepshead Bay today at around 5pm and it felt like a normal ride. Maybe they're only slowing down in Manhattan to affect more people. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There are many reasons why this can't be done in NYC. Some of them include:

1. The current financial condition of the (MTA).

2. The non-uniformity of the subway car fleet.

3. The fact that only the Canarsie line has CBTC and it will be very long until the rest of the system gets it, if that ever happens.

I'm sure there are other issues too...

 

The only lines that use platform doors have CBTC , so installing them on the L Train and 7 train would be a start. Both lines will have one rolling stock type by the end of the decade , and i'm sure the MTA can find the $$$ these aren't huge expensive subway expansions but rather station addons like Countdown clocks or turnstiles... They wouldn't be installed at every station , nor are they overseas but the busy stations have them either edge doors or full enclosed doors which are preferred for stations with alot of space... The issues are minor , the problem is the union who and Rail fanners who will probably see to it that this never happens...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only lines that use platform doors have CBTC , so installing them on the L Train and 7 train would be a start. Both lines will have one rolling stock type by the end of the decade , and i'm sure the MTA can find the $$$ these aren't huge expensive subway expansions but rather station addons like Countdown clocks or turnstiles... They wouldn't be installed at every station , nor are they overseas but the busy stations have them either edge doors or full enclosed doors which are preferred for stations with alot of space... The issues are minor , the problem is the union who and Rail fanners who will probably see to it that this never happens...

 

I think that platform doors would be more expensive than countdown clocks or turnstiles and more complex to install. I'm well aware that these aren't installed in every station overseas. Yes, I have to admit that, as a railfan, I wouldn't like them at all. But that's besides the point, as I believe the (MTA) could spend the money on something else. It's ridiculous to spend that much money, so that these relatively few numbers of people don't jump in front of the train. Plus, this even happens on stations which aren't all that crowded..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There isn't a slowdown at all. I have not been approached, no memo has been passed around, and I operated normal, allowable speed all day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only lines that use platform doors have CBTC , so installing them on the L Train and 7 train would be a start. Both lines will have one rolling stock type by the end of the decade , and i'm sure the MTA can find the $$$ these aren't huge expensive subway expansions but rather station addons like Countdown clocks or turnstiles... They wouldn't be installed at every station , nor are they overseas but the busy stations have them either edge doors or full enclosed doors which are preferred for stations with alot of space... The issues are minor , the problem is the union who and Rail fanners who will probably see to it that this never happens...

 

WTF does railfans and the union have to do about installing Platform Windows! Sure, it might obstruct the view and the ability to take photos, but the WTF does that have to do with the overall decision of whether to install platform window screens or not! Second of all, CBTC isn't even fully installed on the (L), and when it is used (mostly during the weekends/late nights, I think), it's extremely unreliable, and it's very prone to breakdowns and malfunctions. Also, the cost of installing and maintaining these platform screens is astronomically high- money that the (MTA) does not have. Also, will there be screens that are tough enough to survive the demands of the system, and resists scratchiti (as well as other forms of vandalism, and being that this is NYC, I'm sure the vandals will find creative ways to screw this over) and withstand the elements? Both the (7) & the (L) have significant outdoor portions, so could the windows stand up against heavy winds, rains and thunderstorms? Also, can it accommodate the sharp curves of the BMT Eastern Division? Just my 2 cents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There isn't a slowdown at all. I have not been approached, no memo has been passed around, and I operated normal, allowable speed all day.

 

SSSShhhhhhhhh let the armchair T/O's and C/R's think what they want to think.. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's some coverage from SecondAvenueSagas.com:

 

Source: ‘Slowdown’ on tap as labor talks resume :: Second Ave. Sagas

 

Below that, there's another comment about slowdowns:

 

 

I've only taken the (Q) from Coney Island to Sheepshead Bay today at around 5pm and it felt like a normal ride. Maybe they're only slowing down in Manhattan to affect more people. :(

 

Anybody whos taken the Lex ave line knows its a log jam its been that way during the rush even before ATS which has slowed it up even more(ha ha ha)...

 

Yep those T/O's are def dragging the road in Manhattan...:cool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i've read the story you linked to in your post and it might shock you that i agree with some of the authors points. I do disagree with some of the remedies proposed in the piece. I was a civil servant. I am still a taxpayer and was before going into civil service. Last time i looked civil servants were taxpayers, too. Before i myself would demonize any class of people for advocating for any type of salary increase or enhanced benefits i'd take a step back and look at the whole picture. You, i, and the author, looked at that picture and saw that the practices he mentioned were unsustainable over the long run for the taxpayers. Guess what. I agree with that conclusion. Where i part company with the author's opinion and ,it appears, yours is in the conclusion he drew. I would never propose disenfranchising any group of people from organizing and bargaining collectively in either the public or private sector. As a black man who grew up in the civil rights era i can't support anything that reeks with the stench of disenfranchising anyone, for whatever purpose. That being said the article correctly points to the villains in the whole chain but incorrectly paints the picture. It is stated(correctly) that the taxpayers, including those who are civil servants, are left footing the bill. It also states(incorrectly imo) that the taxpayers aren't represented at the negotiating table. With whom are civil servants bargaining with? Themselves? Nope. They are negotiating with, directly or indirectly, representatives or agents of those the taxpayer voted for. In the case of the twu vs mta- nyct the union is bargaining with people appointed by the very politicians the public elected in the first place. The taxpayers in the (MTA) region are fed up and rightfully so imo yet i think the public's anger is mis-directed by the media in many cases. Part of the reason the (MTA) was formed in the first place was so the public's anger and complaints wouldn't be directed at the politicians and it seems to have worked. The (MTA) is oz but your elected officials are the people behind the curtain. Don't overlook that the next time you step into the election booth. Two quick points for you, joe, and the floor is yours people. One is your flippant remark about the truth. I speak for myself, not local 100. We are not one and the same and if you happened to look over my posts through the years even stevie wonder could see that. I say what i perceive to be the truth. I'm a man, not a parrot. The second point goes toward your remark about the union advocating a "slowdown". I've worked for transit, ny telephone, usps, and non-profits in my working career. I don't know your personal history but in all the places i've named that flyer simply means follow rule # 1. Cya. That's my opinion. Carry on.

 

excellent post!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The issues are minor , the problem is the union who and Rail fanners who will probably see to it that this never happens...

 

Im sorry how so?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.