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aristoincurate

When did the subway start running 24/7?

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Hello everyone,

 

Hopefully hopefully you'll be able to help me out on this one, I was wondering earlier, when did the subway start to run 24/7? And do you guys think that it has helped NY to be probably the only 24 hour city in the world?

 

I've tried to look up this info on the web but cannot find anything which leads me to think it has always run 24/7.

 

I know that in London, once the tube closes, things tend to slow down as it isn't as easy to get around, which made me wonder if the Subway helps make NY a 24 hour city.

 

I await with interest your comments!

 

Thanks!

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The subway in New York City was originally constructed to never shut down. So, it has been running 24/7 since 1904.

 

Actually the subways opened in Oct. 1903. Still rest of your statement is correct.

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Hello everyone,

 

Hopefully hopefully you'll be able to help me out on this one, I was wondering earlier, when did the subway start to run 24/7? And do you guys think that it has helped NY to be probably the only 24 hour city in the world?

 

I've tried to look up this info on the web but cannot find anything which leads me to think it has always run 24/7.

 

I know that in London, once the tube closes, things tend to slow down as it isn't as easy to get around, which made me wonder if the Subway helps make NY a 24 hour city.

 

I await with interest your comments!

 

Thanks!

 

It doesn't really help. Most of the city is asleep during the night hours. That is why the NYC Subway works on repairing the system at night. Even though it is open the services usually local, and some stations are closed like Broad Street (J) due to low ridership at night.

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It's 1904. Check your facts.;)

 

October 27th to be exact. The first section from City Hall to 145th Street/Broadway opened. Prior to that, there were just elevated and trolley lines.

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It doesn't really help. Most of the city is asleep during the night hours. That is why the NYC Subway works on repairing the system at night. Even though it is open the services usually local, and some stations are closed like Broad Street (J) due to low ridership at night.

 

That's not answering the question. And the Nassau Street stations can't be closed because of low ridership, cuz it's late night. Unless it gets 1 person a night, that can't be the reason.

 

Though if we include the Els, the year could be pushed back to sometime between 1868-1890.

Edited by LTA1992

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That's not answering the question.

 

Though if we include the Els, the year could be pushed back to sometime between 1868-1890.

 

Which begs the question... since we're pretty clear that the subway ran 24/7 from Day One, was the subway the first in the city to run all night, or did the els run 24/7 as well?

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It's 1904. Check your facts.;)

 

woops i am losing it sorry. Must be getting old at age 39 lol and ready for a nursing home. I guess it's time for ensure and gertoil lol.;)

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Just because TODAY or in the recent past, the TA closed or closes stations such as 145th Street, 148th Street-Lenox Terminal, or Broad Street does not mean that through-out transit history those stations were always closed during the midnight hours.

 

In fact when the Interborough Rapid Transit Company was in operation of the current "number" lines, the 145th Street station was in operation at all times. Why? It was the home of the full-time westside local trains from 145th Street to South Ferry. Similarly on the current J-train, the Broad Street station (that opened in 1931) under the operation of the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Company appears to have been in operation at all times for decades. Prior to the unification of the subways there would be no reason to close the station at night, or stop its train services between Brooklyn and Manhattan.

 

My point is that the subways are older than the MTA, which did not exist as an organization until 1968. Thus current operations and patterns are not "always" the case, that's a reason to understand transit history.

 

The basic question of when did the subways START operating 24/7. The answer is on opening day for each of the companies - IRT, BRT-BMT, and IND. The elevated lines in the main were also 24/7 operations - one of the reasons and the push for subway operation - it would be quieter.

 

Mike

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Just because TODAY or in the recent past, the TA closed or closes stations such as 145th Street, 148th Street-Lenox Terminal, or Broad Street does not mean that through-out transit history those stations were always closed during the midnight hours.

 

In fact when the Interborough Rapid Transit Company was in operation of the current "number" lines, the 145th Street station was in operation at all times. Why? It was the home of the full-time westside local trains from 145th Street to South Ferry. Similarly on the current J-train, the Broad Street station (that opened in 1931) under the operation of the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Company appears to have been in operation at all times for decades. Prior to the unification of the subways there would be no reason to close the station at night, or stop its train services between Brooklyn and Manhattan.

 

My point is that the subways are older than the MTA, which did not exist as an organization until 1968. Thus current operations and patterns are not "always" the case, that's a reason to understand transit history.

 

The basic question of when did the subways START operating 24/7. The answer is on opening day for each of the companies - IRT, BRT-BMT, and IND. The elevated lines in the main were also 24/7 operations - one of the reasons and the push for subway operation - it would be quieter.

 

Mike

 

For this reason I don't realize the actual closures during the FASTRACK !!!! I think that in the city that never sleeps, all the station must be open 24 hours for 365 days. My opinion, of course.

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For this reason I don't realize the actual closures during the FASTRACK !!!! I think that in the city that never sleeps, all the station must be open 24 hours for 365 days. My opinion, of course.

 

If the stations are to be open all the time, how is the maintenance supposed to be done? Last time I checked materials that used throughout the system are subject to wear and tear. Thus they need to be constantly replaced. But if the station are to be open 24/7/365, there is simply no time for it, and without constant maintenance the system will fall apart and the city will be in more trouble then ever.

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I thought that all the stations of the subway had at least 1 token booth open 24/7. Beyond the 18th St station and the Dyre Ave stations, are there other stations without station agents during overnight ? What about the Rockaway stations, for example ? Have them the 24 hours token booths ?

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Just wondering, how long was it typically between trains overnight back in the early 1900s? Today the overnight headways are about 20 minutes if I recall correctly.

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