Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.
Sign in to follow this  
mark1447

MTA is 'mediocre' at telling you when your train isn't running: report

Recommended Posts

The MTA is "mediocre at best" when it comes to letting straphangers know when their trains aren't running, according to a new report by a rider advocacy group.

 

A survey by the New York City Transit Riders Council found the MTA didn't post warnings that certain trains weren't running outside of nearly 40% of the subway stations the group checked last fall. They also found just as few signs inside the stations' mezzanines.

 

"Subway riders have come to expect when they ride on weekends, there are gonna be service diversions," said Andrew Albert, who chairs the Riders Council. "What they don't expect is how terrible the signage is to guide them on their way."

 

According to the council's report, 38% of the 48 stations surveyed had no signs at the entrance, 37% had none on the mezzanine, and 21% had none on the platform. Worst of all, five of the stations had no signs whatsoever, according to the report. Some people posted handwritten signs trying to tell straphangers what was going on.

 

"You shouldn't go down a series of steps and possibly even to the platform level before you realize your train is not running," Albert said Tuesday.

 

The group was also irked that more than a quarter of the stations surveyed didn't offer an alternative route if service had been canceled. Disabled riders were only notified of other handicapped-accessible ways to travel 53% of the time.

 

An MTA spokesman said the agency was adding 26 electronic signs in stations to provide real-time information before riders swipe their MetroCard, but said there were no plans to start posting signs outside of every station in the system.

 

"We agree with the Transit Riders Council that all MTA customers should be aware of service changes before they enter a station, and we share their long-term goal of providing that information," spokesman Kevin Ortiz said in an email.

 

"Unfortunately, posting both full-service directories and route-specific posters at the more than 2,100 station entrances in the MTA system is labor-intensive and costly."

 

Read the rest:

 

http://www.amny.com/urbanite-1.812039/mta-is-mediocre-at-telling-you-when-your-train-isn-t-running-report-1.3653717

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe people should look at the website to find this stuff out. We're in the 21st century here. :huh:

 

Well that's the point, in some instances there is nothing mentioned on the website, even after the event had occurred.

But the e-mail system works fine, not counting some typos.

Update

Ugh late night posts, after rereading the article I agree with the rest of you that these guys sound pathetic.

I was talking about emergency g.o.s rather then planned changes.

Edited by overclocked

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that's the point, in some instances there is nothing mentioned on the website, even after the event had occurred.

But the e-mail system works fine, not counting some typos.

 

 

Its not about having people look at the website bro, its about these brainless people who need to STOP acting like a tourist and look at the SIGNS posted around, or YES the website, if that helps. But no... Not a lot of people read the G/Os posted, look at the signs of which train is it or where its going, etc!

 

This is why the MTA is spending money on platform conductors and workers around to help these people who don't use a brain to look at things. Signs all over.. -_-...

 

Example, People ask if a (C) train come in, "Yes is this the (C) train or where is it", I get the WTF look and I'm Like... "UMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM Yes..................." Like, can't you read the sign? Another is on Facebook, with people I've seen asking questions on the MTAs Fan Page, even the MTA links the G/O site sometimes and people still ask questions about rerouted service smh...

 

The MTA is doing a good job, its not all there fault, its the people. Adding more G/O posters or whatever won't make everyone who ride the system read. Of course there ARE people reading and thats good, but not enough!

Edited by mark1447
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Lance

Regarding scheduled service changes, the (MTA) does put advisory posters in the stations and on the trains. They can't help it if the signs disappear for whatever reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I kinda find that report FLAW, but people are not taking enough time to read the signs in regards to their train schedule at their stations.

The (MTA) communications dept is doing a great job in regards to informing customers to which trains that are not operating on weekends, and weeknights.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the things i hate is sitting on a stuck train for 30-60min due to some delay and the lazy conductor does not make any announcements. With the new tech trains, is isnt easier for them to make announcements or do conductors hate them? A delay of 30+min due to a train traffic when the trains run every 15min seems a bit odd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i was at Union Square, and I had to tell 53 people that the Q wasn't running. It was ridicuolus.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe people should look at the website to find this stuff out. We're in the 21st century here. :huh:

 

 

What if they can't? Yes, it's the 21st century, but that doesn't mean everyone has internet access.

 

Plus, even if they have internet access at home, what if something happens while they're at work? I can't access the internet at my job aside from my smartphone -- and surely you're not suggesting that everyone has a smartphone. (In fact, I'm thinking of getting rid of mine.) So how are they supposed to find out that they're train home isn't running?

 

What if I'm at one of the thousands of outdoor festivals in the city, or I was out running errands for a couple of hours? Or if I was at a baseball game? God forbid there were a problem with the (D)(4)(7) during a game, I'm sure they would announce it at the stadium, but if there's a problem on some other line that I have to transfer to in order to get home, that doesn't do me any good.

 

My point is, the MTA website is a wonderful resource, and is very convenient and useful for planning your trip ahead of time. But it cannot and should not be relied on as the only way to communicate service changes to riders. The fact that it's the 21st century means that there are many, many ways to communicate to riders, and the MTA should use as many of them as possible, including the one that's worked fine for 10, 20, 30 -- and I assume, 108 -- years. Signs on the platform, and preferably before the platform as well.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again? The (MTA) just made a fabulous map called The Weekender. I guess people don't spend time trying to look that up.

 

 

Fabulous? I hate that thing. I don't know if it's because I've gotten so used to SubwayWeekender or just because I'm not used to the flashing dots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Lance

I agree. Those blinking dots can literally mean anything and unless you click on a particular station or line, you won't know whether the line is diverted to another line, to the local/express tracks or simply not running at all. Give me Subway Weekender any day over the (MTA)'s Weekender.

 

@Kacie Jane: While I do agree with you that the agency shouldn't only rely on their website to convey its information, the scenarios you posted above wouldn't apply here anyhow. Those are unplanned service changes and outside of using the train crews and the website, they can't really post those advisories in print form. Unless the unplanned service change lasts long enough to become a planned one (like the time when the (F) and (M) flip-flopped on 53rd and 63rd Streets because of a broken switch or something in Queens), the only way they can convey that information is through the in-station announcements and the PA/CIS screens throughout the system. The problem with that is not every station has the displays yet, so some riders will remain in the dark until that changes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're absolutely right that I only skimmed the OP, and missed the fact that it seems to be talking about solely planned weekend changes. Apologies for that.

 

However, I think the last paragraph of my post is still perfectly applicable to this topic. It's absurd to me that people should be expected to check the internet before they take the subway on the weekend.

 

(For a scenario that is applicable, what if I'm on vacation in the city, and I've left my laptop at home and/or my hotel doesn't have free wifi?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see the (MTA) is now putting people at TS to tell people about FASTRACK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Considering the amount of service and the brevity of time in which stuff goes wrong with MTA-NYCT train service when it does I think it isn't that bad.

 

So, who else has run the new S marker at Bleeker, Northbound!? :lol: Enough to put an elongated, vertical board with Ss!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.