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TheBigLD

Track Worker 3600 Hiring Process

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After working as a track worker, how many years on the job do you need before you can go for a promotion? And would someone be ablebto tell me the types of promotions/pay scale? Thanks

 

From my experience going through Bus Operator training and not making it past training, I think the more important question is how to pass the employment processing at 180 Livingston Street, which will include a physical** and how to pass the training session. If I am correct, isn't this divided into 2 parts? The first part is in a classroom at PS 248 in Brooklyn and the second part is on the road training, which involves something similar to the video below?

 

**Speaking of the physical, when I went for the physical last time on December 31st, 2013, I barely passed the vision portion of it. I don't normally wear glasses, however once in a while I do for long distance vision, since I'm on the computer so much. If I tell MAC (Medical Assessment Center) that I wear glasses, do I need a letter from my eye doctor, or will I be able to get by without one? The reason why I am asking is because I have been informed that if I have any medical condition, I should have a note from a doctor stating that it is under control, as I learned this the hard way when the TA physician first diagnosed me with muscle spasm, which is now on and off. However, so many people, including TA employees, wear glasses, therefore I'm wondering what should I do about this?

 

Thanks in advance...

 

 

Edited by YoungNYCSubwayFan

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From my experience going through Bus Operator training and not making it past training, I think the more important question is how to pass the employment processing at 180 Livingston Street, which will include a physical** and how to pass the training session. If I am correct, isn't this divided into 2 parts? The first part is in a classroom at PS 248 in Brooklyn and the second part is on the road training, which involves something similar to the video below?

 

**Speaking of the physical, when I went for the physical last time on December 31st, 2013, I barely passed the vision portion of it. I don't normally wear glasses, however once in a while I do for long distance vision, since I'm on the computer so much. If I tell MAC (Medical Assessment Center) that I wear glasses, do I need a letter from my eye doctor, or will I be able to get by without one? The reason why I am asking is because I have been informed that if I have any medical condition, I should have a note from a doctor stating that it is under control, as I learned this the hard way when the TA physician first diagnosed me with muscle spasm, which is now on and off. However, so many people, including TA employees, wear glasses, therefore I'm wondering what should I do about this?

 

Thanks in advance...

 

 

IMO I think the glasses situation with MTA be black or white. Meaning either you do or you don't . They might just put more emphasis on it considering there's a good chance you'll be working in dark tunnels. Or outside at night. The vibe that I'm getting from you is you don't want to wear them if you don't have to but for @ least 8 hours on the job you may be forced to wear them.

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I would just bring the glasses with you and say you were them for distance.

 

The biggest concern is color blindness. Wether you are a Train Operator, Track worker, etc. you need to be able to tell the difference between Red, Yellow, Green and even Blue (emergency Alarm Boxes).

 

They give the standard distance test with the eye chart and last I was there a test for color where you look for faintly colored numbers and letters in a pattern of dots of within other colors.

 

For those who need glasses your ID will say Corrective Lenses and you will get a form to bring to a GVS for prescription safety glasses.

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Well if that is true,the list will not be out until November,that just means some Big Shot is trying to get to someones list number before that test expires. 

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I read on the exam notice that top hourly rate is $29 an hour.  it is possible to make over 100k without promotions ?

 

Technically on the Notice of Examination (http://web.mta.info/nyct/hr/archives/pdf/3600.pdf), the top hourly rate is $29.1050 per hour. Therefore, if we do some mathematical computations:

 

$29.1050 x 8 = $232.84 per day. (8 hours per each normal work day)

$232.84 x 5 = $1,164.20 per week.(5 days/week)

$1164.20 x 52 = $60,538.40

So if you work no overtime the answer to the question is 'no'. 

 

However, if you work overtime, the mathematical computations are:

$29.1050 x 8 = $232.84 per day (normal 8 hours)

$232.84 x 5 = $1,164.20 for a normal 5 day work week.

Now overtime is time and a half. Therefore, half of $29.1050 = $14.5525, and the sum of these is $43.6575 per hour.

$43.6575 x 8 = $349.26 (for one day of overtime)

$349.26 x 52 = $18161.52

So if we add $60,538.40 + $18161.52, this comes out to $78,699.92, shy of $100K.

 

Now if you work 7 days a week, in which 2 of them are overtime:

$18161.52 x 2 = $36323.04

$60,538.4 + $36323.04 = $96861.44

 

So in the long run, in my opinion, the answer is 'no'. The reason why is because I did the above computations using 52 weeks, which means having little to no vacation and time off whatsoever, even your regular RDO days.

 

However, you do get compensated a little more for working holidays (eg Presidents Day, July 4th, Labor Day, etc.) Therefore, if you are a workaholic and you do work 52 weeks out of the year, you will probably make it or come very close, like within $2,000.

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thanks for taking the time out to provide me with a lengthy reply, btw, would you take sanitation or track worker if both agencies called you around the same time and why? haha

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thanks for taking the time out to provide me with a lengthy reply, btw, would you take sanitation or track worker if both agencies called you around the same time and why? haha

 

You're welcome. I majored in mathematics during my undergraduate studies, so doing those computations just took a little bit of thinking and time.

 

Speaking of Sanitation, I do plan on filing for the exam next month. If I had to choose between the two, I would go for Transit. Why?

a) My previous 2 generations, and my Uncle have worked for NYC Transit by holding various titles.

b) There is room for promotion and/or switching to another title (e.g. transfer from track worker to either conductor or train operator, providing you take and pass the civil service examinations for those titles respectively)

c) Other reasons which I cannot think of right now.

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I read on the exam notice that top hourly rate is $29 an hour.  it is possible to make over 100k without promotions ?

thanks for taking the time out to provide me with a lengthy reply, btw, would you take sanitation or track worker if both agencies called you around the same time and why? haha

First off, the top pay for a regular trackworker is $31.5075 an hour(not including night/weekend diff). Can you make over $100k with that hourly rate? Yes, most trackworkers in Capital make over $100k(without having to work 7 days a week). Would I take take sanitation or trackworker if called at the same time? I would take sanitation. It's a better job all around. Better pay, better benefits,better pension and 22 yrs and out retirement. Trackworker is a good job but sanitation is better(jmo).BTW, I've been a trackworker over 20 yrs. I know what I'm talking about.
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b) There is room for promotion and/or switching to another title (e.g. transfer from track worker to either conductor or train operator, providing you take and pass the civil service examinations for those titles respectively)

There's definitely room for promotion in track dept(in house). You can also pick track "specialist" jobs where you make a few dollars an hour more than regular trackworker. The only title you can transfer to is Power Distribution Maintainer after passing a test(not easy)and having good sick time. Trackworkers hourly pay is more than Conductors so that would be a demotion to go to that title. There are no more promotional tests for train operator. You would have to take and pass an open competitive test, get called, then resign from your trackworker job. Edited by SpikeMauler

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Thanks for all the info, also, does a newly hired mta track worker fall under that new tier 6 nonsense where they take 1/2 of your ss when you become of age, or are they under a separate entity?

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Thanks for all the info, also, does a newly hired mta track worker fall under that new tier 6 nonsense where they take 1/2 of your ss when you become of age, or are they under a separate entity?

No, the Tier 6 SS service retirement benefit clause does not pertain to Transit Operating Force. Edited by SpikeMauler

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...There are no more promotional tests for train operator...

 

The union offers the Transit Certificate Program. Unless Track Workers are ineligible to participate in that program, they can go through that route and apply for the promotional.

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The union offers the Transit Certificate Program. Unless Track Workers are ineligible to participate in that program, they can go through that route and apply for the promotional.

I've never heard of the Transit Certificate Program. Ah, I think you're talking about the TUF program run by the union. I don't think trackworkers qualify for that(I might be wrong though). That's for entry level job holders to upgrade their positions through training programs run by the union.

Edited by SpikeMauler

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Sorry for all the questions, but can someone also explain or breakdown mta's pension plan for a track worker versus a pension from say working for the sanitation? i thought i heard someone say you get a full pension if you work for the mta as opposed to 50% as in the city jobs but this doesnt seem true to me.  any info?

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