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8attlet0ads

Few questions about NYCTA trains and stuff

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always had these questions in my mind: have you personally ever seen a nyc train overshoot a station? does this happen often?

2. why dont we ever hear about train derailments and crashes? i'm pretty sure it happens, ive only seen like one news report on youtube of a nyc train derailment

3.how the hell do the trains brake so damn fast??? this is similar to my first questions, I dont know how these trains never overshoot the stations!!

and yeah I guess thats all I gotta ask for now

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You double posted.

 

1. Overshooting a station does not usually ever happen. The T/O can get in trouble for that.

2. Derailments don't happen because T/O cannot drive the train like and idiot.

3. Brakes are strong on subway trains.

 

T/O = Train Operator.

Edited by jimmy7train

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always had these questions in my mind: have you personally ever seen a nyc train overshoot a station? does this happen often?

It happens every once in a while, but T/Os are generally very good at their jobs and skilled at operating trains.

2. why dont we ever hear about train derailments and crashes? i'm pretty sure it happens, ive only seen like one news report on youtube of a nyc train derailment

It's very rare. Derailments used to be more common in the 1970s-80s when maintenance was really bad and tracks were in worse condition. The signal system is designed to keep trains from crashing into each other, which you can learn about here:

http://nycsubway.org/articles/signals.html

3.how the hell do the trains brake so damn fast??? this is similar to my first questions, I dont know how these trains never overshoot the stations!!

Well, they have powerful brakes and T/Os know how early they need to apply them to stop at the end of the platform.

and yeah I guess thats all I gotta ask for now

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You double posted.

 

1. Overshooting a station does not usually ever happen. The T/O can get in trouble for that.

2. Derailments don't happen because T/O cannot drive the train like and idiot.

3. Brakes are strong on subway trains.

 

T/O = Train Operator.

 

1. This is slightly true. Though you'd probably get undershooting more then overshooting. Overshooting is very slim as anyone here would say.

2. Saying derailments never happening is like saying cars never crash. Derailments aren't always the T/O's fault, it could be mechanical; like the DeKalb derailment.

3. It's not that their brakes are strong. From what I think, there's brakes on each car so braking is easier for the train rather then having brakes on one car.

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1. This is slightly true. Though you'd probably get undershooting more then overshooting.

Overshooting is very slim as anyone here would say.

2. Saying derailments never happening is like saying cars never crash. Derailments aren't always the T/O's fault, it could be mechanical; like the DeKalb derailment.

3. It's not that their brakes are strong. From what I think, there's brakes on each car so braking is easier for the train rather then having brakes on one car.

 

I wouldn't say slim, during heavy rain and snowstorms, it happens very often, especially with them 142As

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For the 3rd question, we feel strong brake because of the mass of subway trains.

The mass of a subway train is so large, such that even a slow acceleration could produce a large force on our bodies...

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I agree with most of the post answering the questions. I hope he not comparing to suburban commuter rail. These commuter rails have different rules to play. Nj Transit always jump all over the place in the station. My hometown station can have ten cars safely in platform. Sometime the engine are in front , so the engineers want to put the engine after the station platform so all 10 cars are in the station. I called this overshoot but they have a reason. Sometime some engineers are undershoot as well. I think they do it for crowd control meaning that they want you either in back or front of the train.Not all commuter rail cars doors open at every stop. There are some stations are shorter then other. In subway they need to line it up right because there no room to do crowd control. Most stations are usually have same platform size. All doors need to be open when all cars in the station. Braking need to be good and tight because they are in constant uses, Commuter rail have more stopping distance then subway. Almost every subway stations are about 5 to 7 blocks apart. Commuter rail can be up to wherever they are. Most of them are averaging 5 to 10 miles. You can see the different in braking need. Also all train cars need brakes so all the cars can be at same speed when stopping. If one of them failed to brake, you will get a bumpy stop because that car is still in higher speed then others. Look at all the bogie under the commuter rail cars. That will help you what is going on in the subway. Also i heard they are expanding that when subway cars are braking they are pumping back in electricity into the third rail to help to slow down the train as well so the brake show wont have to wear out more often. Nobody want derailment. It can be either track problems, enginners fault or signal failure. This is on both commuters and subway.

 

The above is not a 100 % fact info. I watched shows that is based on Subway or Railroading from Discovery or other learning channel. Most of them are logical reason of hw it worked ion this transportation modes.

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Not a NYCT train, but a certain railroad within NYC city limits had a yard derailment earlier this week.....

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