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BMT Astoria/Broadway Line ridership patterns

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The title says it. I am so willing to know why Astoria residents need more frequent service than just the (N) alone. They already have more service with the (Q). What's wrong with just waiting 8-9 minutes for the (N)? And that includes the Broadway Local with the (R) alone as well...Yes the (N) can still stop at 49th Street because of ridership demands but I need to know how would that be too much service over in Brooklyn with the (N) coming once-twice every ten minutes. Trains pick up riders for ONE minute after arriving/stopping and before leaving a station. So you're waiting 8-9 minutes. I still want to know how would Astoria residents between Ditmars Blvd and 49th Street overcrowd the (N) so fast (Same with the (R) Local in Manhattan if left alone with the exception of 49th Street). Why not have both the (N)(R) run every 8-9 minutes?

Edited by RollOverMyHead
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The title says it. I am so willing to know why Astoria residents need more frequent service than just the (N) alone. They already have more service with the (Q). What's wrong with just waiting 8-9 minutes for the (N)? And that includes the Broadway Local with the (R) alone as well...Yes the (N) can still stop at 49th Street because of ridership demands but I need to know how would that be too much service over in Brooklyn with the (N) coming once-twice every ten minutes. Trains pick up riders for ONE minute after arriving/stopping and before leaving a station. So you're waiting 8-9 minutes. I still want to know how would Astoria residents between Ditmars Blvd and 49th Street overcrowd the (N) so fast (Same with the (R) Local in Manhattan if left alone with the exception of 49th Street). Why not have both the (N)(R) run every 8-9 minutes?

 

 

Because it gets really, really, really, really, really crowded in the rush hours and no one likes crowded trains. It already gets crowded with the (N) and (Q), and it was crowded with both the (N) and (W), back when they were running together.

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The (N) needs to have increased service on weekends. A majority of Astoria line stations are ranked in the 100's in ridership.The Sea Beach Line also has stations that have good ridership . The (N) should have 8min headways for weekends.

Edited by j express

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8 minute headways means seven trains per hour in both ways...I'm quite sure the (N) can handle Astoria on weekends alone.

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8 minute headways means seven trains per hour in both ways...I'm quite sure the (N) can handle Astoria on weekends alone.

 

 

Which it does.

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Do more than 50% of Astoria residents work in Lower Manhattan below Canal Street?

Edited by RollOverMyHead

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8 minute headways means seven trains per hour in both ways...I'm quite sure the (N) can handle Astoria on weekends alone.

 

 

Weekends is fine how it is, weekdays is the one where the supplement service (this case the (Q) ) is necessary....

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This better not turn into another war over whether the (W) should come back or not.......

 

 

No worries, it won't. We are focusing on current levels right now. ;)

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The (Q)'s needed on weekdays for sure. I just wished they could space them out better. It's not uncommon to see a Manhattan-bound (N) immediately followed by a (Q), then followed by a long wait until another (N) arrives (and vice versa). I'm told that bottlenecking is the main issue.

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Guest Lance

The only way you could possibly get the N to run solo on the Astoria line is to have it run at the current combined intervals of the N and Q. And even then, it would be a hard sell to the residents.

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The only way you could possibly get the N to run solo on the Astoria line is to have it run at the current combined intervals of the N and Q. And even then, it would be a hard sell to the residents.

Why would that be a hard sell? I see no problem with (N) service at 4 minute headways. Edited by JubaionBx12+SBS

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Why would that be a hard sell? I see no problem with (N) service at 4 minute headways.

 

Congestion problems. For instance Stillwell could not handle all of the (N) termanting and startng there. Sure you can start some trains from 86th St Brooklyn, but it would be hard unless the (Q) has a service reduction.

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Guest Lance

Why would that be a hard sell? I see no problem with (N) service at 4 minute headways.

 

The folks would catch a fit if there wasn't a Broadway express line serving Astoria. Of course, it's not like it really matters since there aren't that many local-only stops on the Broadway trunk line that would make much of a time difference. But, you know how it is with these "expresses". And if the N were to become a Broadway Express, the R would be all on it's own as the Broadway local.

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The folks would catch a fit if there wasn't a Broadway express line serving Astoria. Of course, it's not like it really matters since there aren't that many local-only stops on the Broadway trunk line that would make much of a time difference. But, you know how it is with these "expresses". And if the N were to become a Broadway Express, the R would be all on it's own as the Broadway local.

 

Well if it's true that most Astoria people transfer for the (4)(5)(6) then why not send a few shuttles to the transfer like the (5) in the Bronx shuttles?

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Congestion problems. For instance Stillwell could not handle all of the (N) termanting and startng there. Sure you can start some trains from 86th St Brooklyn, but it would be hard unless the (Q) has a service reduction.

 

The BMT Sea Beach Line ridership is not like the BMT Astoria Line. Sea Beach doesn't have high ridership, as many others said in the past threads, no need to increase so much (N) service just for Astoria because that would mean too much service over the entire line itself, especially Sea Beach. If its just waiting 8-9 minutes for the (N), then fine. At least, that's not more trains on the entire (N) line like many others said. But running it at 4 minute headways would cost much more than just having all its riders wait 8-9 minutes for it.

Edited by RollOverMyHead
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Trains pick up for 1 minute after stopping and before leaving. 8-9 minute waits for the entire (N) line is not more trains. It can come once-twice within every ten minutes. A supplement is fine for the weekday periods as currently understood and because of the 60th tube. But since many people kept on saying that Astoria needs more frequent than just the (N) alone, well though okay.

 

As for the bunching of service, well, both trains do come once within ten minutes right? (N) and then a (Q) or vice-versa. I don't see how can the (MTA) fix this problem...Within ten minutes, there's one or two trains close together. It's not like you are going to space them out more unless you give the two trains slightly a little long headways. Its within TEN MINUTES for both trains.

Edited by RollOverMyHead

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The (Q)'s needed on weekdays for sure. I just wished they could space them out better. It's not uncommon to see a Manhattan-bound (N) immediately followed by a (Q), then followed by a long wait until another (N) arrives (and vice versa). I'm told that bottlenecking is the main issue.

 

THIS^^^ absolutely the erratic service pattern that I was talking about in the previous thread that got locked...

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Trains pick up for 1 minute after stopping and before leaving. 8-9 minute waits for the entire (N) line is not more trains. It can come once-twice within every ten minutes. A supplement is fine for the weekday periods as currently understood and because of the 60th tube. But since many people kept on saying that Astoria needs more frequent than just the (N) alone, well though okay.

 

As for the bunching of service, well, both trains do come once within ten minutes right? (N) and then a (Q) or vice-versa. I don't see how can the (MTA) fix this problem...Within ten minutes, there's one or two trains close together. It's not like you are going to space them out more unless you give the two trains slightly a little long headways. Its within TEN MINUTES for both trains.

 

The more spacing could work well within ten minutes but with such high ridership there's risk that the train gets held by either crowd or passengers that block the doors which gives delays in the spacing. So technically it could be spaced more but then on lines with lower ridership.

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The more spacing could work well within ten minutes but with such high ridership there's risk that the train gets held by either crowd or passengers that block the doors which gives delays in the spacing. So technically it could be spaced more but then on lines with lower ridership.

 

That's true...I just can't see how it would work but yeah...

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Well if it's true that most Astoria people transfer for the (4)(5)(6) then why not send a few shuttles to the transfer like the (5) in the Bronx shuttles?

 

That will nevery fly (pardon the pun). While it is possible to turn trains at Lexington/59th, it would be complete chaos if they did it during rush hours. In fact, the only time you really can get away with turning trains at Lex is late nights when only the (N) stops there.

Congestion problems. For instance Stillwell could not handle all of the (N) termanting and startng there. Sure you can start some trains from 86th St Brooklyn, but it would be hard unless the (Q) has a service reduction.

 

And that would result in a service cut at Brighton Local stops, which do have significantly higher ridership than Sea Beach stations. Perhaps the (Q) alone could handle Astoria since it runs a bit more frequently than the (N) and has higher ridership on its Brooklyn section than the (N) does.
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