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kingal11234

Why are Path trains smaller than NYC trains and Metro North trains Bigger?

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Does anybody no why path trains are smaller than NYC trains?. Why are Metro North trains bigger?

 

 

Some NYC subway trains are the same size as Metro-North trains, but most regional railroad services like Metro-North use 75' cars or longer. I believe that PATH was built to use smaller subway cars, like the numbered lines of the NYC subway.

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Does anybody no why path trains are smaller than NYC trains?. Why are Metro North trains bigger?

 

 

PATH tunnels were built with tighter curves that prevents the Port Authority from purchasing longer trains. Remember: PATH is only four years older than the NYC subway.

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I think you meant newer, Nova. :)

 

MNCR and LIRR and other railroads have substantially more clearance, and can run wider and longer cars than subway trains. The PATH, much like the A division, CTA, and Boston Blue/Orange lines were built in a time when the standard railcar was shorter and narrower than it is today. Boston pioneered the widebodied transit car with the opening of the Red line, and the BMT roughly copied their dimensions when they built their subways. (SIR and what is now the SEPTA Broad line and Patco in turn copied the BMT's designs.)

 

By the way, neither PATH nor SIRT are FRA compliant. PATH has received numerous waivers, and SIRT is no longer an FRA Railroad at all, and has not been for over 20 years.

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PATH trains cars are 51 feet long, the same length as the cars on the IRT. However, PATH trains are 7 and 8 cars long, which are 357 and 408 feet. The IRT uses 10 and 11 car trains, which are 510 and 561 feet long. LIRR/MNRR uses 85 feet trains. So, a 6 car train of M7s are 510 feet, the same length of a IRT 10 car train.

 

PATH is a subway... :) for putting this in the right forum

 

 

PATH is a railroad.

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PATH was modeled after the IRT. Like Philly's Broad Street was modeled after the BMT. The IRT was built so it only needed non-private property to build, hence the narrower cars and tunnels.

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PATH's most easy comparison is to PATCO, both are more close to inter-burben railroad than a true railroad, though PATCO just have larger cars than PATH. just like the easy differences between the B Division and A Division in the Subways.

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To better clarify: it's a rapid-transit railroad.

 

No it's not. It's a railroad, I'm certified as a railroad conductor by the FRA for PATH.

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I'm pretty sure it's a railroad.

 

No it's not. It's a railroad, I'm certified as a railroad conductor by the FRA for PATH.

 

The customer service guys are certified conductors? Damn!

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I'm pretty sure it's a railroad.

 

 

The customer service guys are certified conductors? Damn!

 

Nope, I've been a conductor for almost 2 months now but they haven't changed my title here.

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