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Via Garibaldi 8

What do ticket collectors do on MetroNorth/LIRR aside from collect tickets?

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Since I've been using MetroNorth and the LIRR quite a bit of late, I got to thinking about what those ticket collectors do besides collect tickets? If my memory serves me correctly, the folks that work on MetroNorth & the LIRR get paid decently so they must do more than just collect tickets.

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Since I've been using MetroNorth and the LIRR quite a bit of late, I got to thinking about what those ticket collectors do besides collect tickets? If my memory serves me correctly, the folks that work on MetroNorth & the LIRR get paid decently so they must do more than just collect tickets.

 

 

Let see.

 

1)Verify Monthly/weekly passes.

2)On Older trains(none-M7 trains) i.e disel trains on Poughkeepsie/Upper Hudson, Danbury and Wassic lines make announcements.

3)Answer Passenger questions about train schedules, etc.

4)In Crisis, such as disabled trains act as leaders and or also call the police/emt is needed such as sick passengers etc.

5)Report to Police disruptive passengers.

 

That the short list. Keep in mind most MNRR trains have 3 conductors/fare collectors. On lower used "shuttles " aka "scoots" it could be only one conductor.

 

Hope it answers your question. Any reason for bringing it up VG8?

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Yeah, none of this seems esp. difficult. How much do they earn a year??

 

 

Someone like Truckie who is a MNRR Conductor would be the one to best answer that question. I think(could be wrong) a senior MNRR/LIRR Conductor is making $50,000-plus a year but don't quote me on it.

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Yeah, none of this seems esp. difficult. How much do they earn a year??

 

 

They do way more than what was listed. And take many tests in order to get into the position

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Someone like Truckie who is a MNRR Conductor would be the one to best answer that question. I think(could be wrong) a senior MNRR/LIRR Conductor is making $50,000-plus a year but don't quote me on it.

 

I get confused when I hear "conductor". I think of someone operating a train. Do they operate the trains as well? If not then what they earn is pretty nice if you ask me, plus with all of the walking around they keep in shape. Seems like they rotate them a lot though. I only get the same conductor a few times and then a new one comes to get the tickets.

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I get confused when I hear "conductor". I think of someone operating a train. Do they operate the trains as well? If not then what they earn is pretty nice if you ask me, plus with all of the walking around they keep in shape. Seems like they rotate them a lot though. I only get the same conductor a few times and then a new one comes to get the tickets.

 

 

Send a PM/wait for Truckie who is a MNRR Conductor to answer these question. My brother until earlier this year worked for MNRR at the GCT offices as a shift supervisor in their call center. I have some knowledge about MNRR/LIRR but again i let a MNRR or LIRR employee or other regular poster with knowledge on this, answer your questions VG8 ok?

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I get confused when I hear "conductor". I think of someone operating a train. Do they operate the trains as well? If not then what they earn is pretty nice if you ask me, plus with all of the walking around they keep in shape. Seems like they rotate them a lot though. I only get the same conductor a few times and then a new one comes to get the tickets.

 

Engineers operate the train. You have Conductors and Assistant Conductors who have to be certified up to Conductors after a certain amount of time. Conductors also serve as flaggers so you might see some in regular boots and jeans in the yard or with a Engineer during some equipment movements or with Engineers in the work engines . Even those information people on the platform during unusual circumstances like yesterday ,most are conductors. They have a lot of responsibilities and most know all signals and layout just like the Engineer. I know Truckie will add more insight. And yes they do make good money, but at a cost.
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They do way more than what was listed. And take many tests in order to get into the position

 

They should also be trained in intermodal connectivity to assist customers transferring to other modes. They should be equipped with CT bus maps and be knowledgeable about the Bee-line network and regional connecting services like danbury bus and ulster poughkeepsie link. Some dude in Brooklyn should NOT know more about buses in metro-north territory than MNRR employees. You know it's bad when people think I live in CT or even dutchess!!!!!!!!

 

If I was a conductor I will help customers with connections and inform them of connecting services bus lines should be announced automated style except when serving an area with too many lines like NYC stations obviously.

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They should also be trained in intermodal connectivity to assist customers transferring to other modes. They should be equipped with CT bus maps and be knowledgeable about the Bee-line network and regional connecting services like danbury bus and ulster poughkeepsie link. Some dude in Brooklyn should NOT know more about buses in metro-north territory than MNRR employees. You know it's bad when people think I live in CT or even dutchess!!!!!!!!

 

If I was a conductor I will help customers with connections and inform them of connecting services bus lines should be announced automated style except when serving an area with too many lines like NYC stations obviously.

 

That's not there job bro. There main concern and what the RR wants is to make sure they bring you safely to your destination in "THEIR" system. Once you get to your stop your on your own. In this day in age with technology, if you don't know where your going just stay home. It's hard enough to qualify with difficult training program . Hey if you want scramble your brain some more after getting pounded with information during class about some bus routes then go knock yourself out .Let me tell you to qualify is no picnic.
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Ok folks, here we go. I'll do my best to explain everything anyone wanted to know about conductors but were afraid to ask.

 

Yes, there is the obvious, collects tickets, make announcements and operate doors. That is only a small portion of the overall responsibilities.

 

First and foremost all Metro North conductors come out of roughly 10 months of training as a fully certified conductor based on the Federal Railroad Administrations requirements. All Metro North conductors are required to be qualified on the operating rules and physical characteristics of the territory they operate on.

 

The operating rules include:

 

-knowing all the signals (some 30 to 40 of them)

-how to operate with a train control apparatus failure

-how to perform a brake test with the engineer

-how to trouble shoot problems with the train such as brake issues or propulsion issues

-how to make a back up move.

-knowing the FRA hours of service requirements

 

Physical Characteristics include:

 

-Knowing the tracks and what rules apply to what parts of the territory whether it's interlocking rules, centralized train control rules, cab signal system rules, or MBS rules.

-Must know all of the passenger stations and lengths of the platforms.

-All of the control points (interlockings)

-All of the highway grade crossings and what kind of protection each have.

-What tracks have third rail or catenaries.

-know the yards to the point that you have to label all of the yard tracks on a map of any given yard and know who is in charge of each of the tracks (yard master or mechanical foreman). Know the speeds in the yards, etc.

 

 

The different types of conductors:

 

Passenger conductors - are on passenger trains

Yard conductors - responsible for switching out individual cars from consists, usually for equipment being shopped.

Conductor Flag - They work with third party contractors and make sure they get the proper protection in the even they have to foul tracks.

 

Every passenger train has a minimum of one conductor (the "boss" of the train). Some have one or more assistant conductors. While the assistant conductors are fully qualified conductors, they report to the conductor and carry out the duties given to him or her such as lining a train in or out of the yard. Set up a train for service which includes setting up the ASI, taking care of door through switches. Positioning themselves with the engineer and calling out signals when needed (such as in GCT).

 

This is only an overview of the duties and responsibilities and what the passenger sees is a very small part of the big picture. Do conductors get paid well? Yeah, I won't lie, they do. Those working as assistant conductors get paid a little less but have less responsibility.

 

Regardless, as well as we get paid, it comes with a price. Missed holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, etc. The railroad doesn't stop on holidays. If you're required to work on a holiday, you're expected to work. The trains aren't going to stop running to see your kid opening up their presents on Christmas morning. Also railroaders have a relatively high divorce rate. In many cases a railroader will have days off that don't fall in line with his or her spouse.

 

One thing conductors do not do is "operate" the train. That job is reserved for the engineer.

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If I was a conductor I will help customers with connections and inform them of connecting services bus lines should be announced automated style except when serving an area with too many lines like NYC stations obviously.

 

 

 

That's great if you know them. There is nothing provided to us with what they are. We are supposed to know connecting train service such as when the connection is to Danbury from the New Haven main line train.

 

We have enough to carry with us on a day to day basis. I doubt you will see one of us with every bus or ferry schedule that connects with any given train.

Edited by Truckie
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That's great if you know them. There is nothing provided to us with what they are. We are supposed to know connecting train service such as when the connection is to Danbury from the New Haven main line train.

 

We have enough to carry with us on a day to day basis. I doubt you will see one of us with every bus or ferry schedule that connects with any given train.

 

Not every but at least in general so if one can't help another can. Like a course on connecting services announcing connecting buses at each station the little things go a long way

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Not every but at least in general so if one can't help another can. Like a course on connecting services announcing connecting buses at each station the little things go a long way

 

 

NJ Transit does do so at major stops i.e Newark Penn Station such as Path, Greyhound and Newark Light Rail.

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Not every but at least in general so if one can't help another can. Like a course on connecting services announcing connecting buses at each station the little things go a long way

 

It would be great until you get a complaint letter in your file about how you gave a passenger the wrong information and they got stuck somewhere because you didn't know about some bus G.O. that altered service that day.

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Truckie, when you say that they have to know the territory, does that apply for the whole MNRR system or just the line you're operating on? I assume it's the whole system, but I just want to be sure.

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Truckie, when you say that they have to know the territory, does that apply for the whole MNRR system or just the line you're operating on? I assume it's the whole system, but I just want to be sure.

 

 

Entire East of Hudson system. Waterbury Branch and Amtrak Hell Gate are necessary only for those who work them, IIRC.

 

Truckie: Since when were you in T&E? I remember seeing you on these forums as a customer service agent. Or am I thinking of a different user?

Edited by Amtrak7

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Truckie, when you say that they have to know the territory, does that apply for the whole MNRR system or just the line you're operating on? I assume it's the whole system, but I just want to be sure.

 

 

Conductors are qualified on a minimum of two lines dependent on where they live. Example, Someone that lives along the Hudson Line will only need to qualify on the Hudson and Harlem Lines. Someone living along the New Haven Line only need to qualify on the New Haven Line, along with the three branches, and the Harlem Line. Someone living in and around NYC is required to qualify on all three lines, minus the Danbury and Waterbury Branches. Everyone, New Haven Line folks included is required to be qualified on the Hudson Line as far north as CP12 due to trains going to Highbridge Yard and Yankee game day service.

 

There are also a handful of conductors that are qualified on the West of Hudson. Even though NJT provides the passenger service crews, Metro North's conductors do the flag jobs over there.

 

Metro North's engineers are required to be qualified on the entire EOH system.

 

Truckie: Since when were you in T&E? I remember seeing you on these forums as a customer service agent. Or am I thinking of a different user?

 

 

No, that's me. I've been in T&E almost a year now. Its only been six months or so that my profile indicated such.

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Truckie:

What line do you work?

 

I live on the New Haven line. Crews do a good job announcing BEFORE the train leaves GCT which doors won't open at short platform stations. I rode the Harlem line last week and no announcement was made about short platform stations until the train left Purdys, the last long platform station. Passengers had to walk between cars while the train was in motion even though instructions on the doors say not to do it to get off at Croton Falls and Brewster.

 

Are crews instructed when to make these announcements?

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The question is.... What do they do with the tickets they collect?

 

 

Put them in an envelope, turn them in (at the end of each shift?) for the MTA to either audit or dispose of.

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Is this so they count ridership.

 

 

Monthly, weekly, and 10 trip tickets aren't collected so the ridership count will always be low. I've seen traffic checkers at GCT count passengers with a counting device. They press a button and the counter advances by one.

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Monthly, weekly, and 10 trip tickets aren't collected so the ridership count will always be low. I've seen traffic checkers at GCT count passengers with a counting device. They press a button and the counter advances by one.

 

Cool.

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Entire East of Hudson system. Waterbury Branch and Amtrak Hell Gate are necessary only for those who work them, IIRC.

 

Truckie: Since when were you in T&E? I remember seeing you on these forums as a customer service agent. Or am I thinking of a different user?

 

 

Why would a MN crew operate over the Hell Gate line? The MN rule book is not applicable on the Hell Gate. MN Crews would have to learn Amtrak's rule book, NORAC. LIRR crews have to know NORAC rule book because of Penn Station.

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