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Runaways in the Subway

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I'm curious if anyone knows of any cases of runaways in the NYC subway system. What sorts of systems are in place to prevent this if the operator should fail to stop it? I'm new to this and am writing an article on modern prevention of runaways and their history -- any help is appreciated!

 

Thanks!

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All the signals have a 'stop arm' that comes up next to the track when the signal is red. If a train were to run a red signal, the stop arm physically engages a switch on the bottom of every subway car. The switch, once engaged, "trips" the subway train putting it into emergency braking. As a result of this, while there have been rare derailments and collisions, I don't believe there has been a true runaway

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There is also a switch in the tunnels that manually cuts the power to the third rail between stations. If this ever did happen a group of TA employees could walk into the tunnel, open the box where the switch is located, and cut the power before the run-away train hits that segment of track.

Edited by DanTheTransitMan

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Runaways are nothing to worry about in our subway system...

 

Now imagine you're the engineer of a 7,500 ft long coal train weighing more than 12,000 tons. You're cresting a long 1.5% grade. Because of your unprofessional use of the air brakes you've used up all your air and is left with nothing...

 

Unlike subway trains there isn't no quick re-charging of the brake pipe. Forget about thinking of using your dynamic or independent brakes, they sure as hell won't stop your train...

 

Now you're screwed with 12,000 tons of heavy coal traveling at 50 mph plus, right in back of you...

 

Hey just be glad your load didn't consist of propane...

 

Yep, and "train drivers" have the easiest job in the world...

Edited by Jamaica Line
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I'm curious if anyone knows of any cases of runaways in the NYC subway system. What sorts of systems are in place to prevent this if the operator should fail to stop it? I'm new to this and am writing an article on modern prevention of runaways and their history -- any help is appreciated!

 

Thanks!

 

First answer is No....

 

Second answer the system that is in place is called the C/R pulling the cord.....

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Or Money Train.

 

 

You know, I've tried to buy that movie a bunch of times and no store ever seems to carry it. I would love to finally see it myself one day.

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The only way you can have a runaway would be if the air brakes were not working (Missing brake shoes or something :P), AND the handbrakes would have to not be working as well.

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You know, I've tried to buy that movie a bunch of times and no store ever seems to carry it. I would love to finally see it myself one day.

 

 

Netflix and Amazon Instant video should have it right now.

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The closest thing to a "runaway train" to take place in the subway is probably the Malbone Street wreck.

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Interesting -- thanks this is all good info.

 

What are the toughest areas of the transit system to navigate with respect to control of the train? Are there specific sections of track that're notoriously tough?

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You know, I've tried to buy that movie a bunch of times and no store ever seems to carry it. I would love to finally see it myself one day.

 

It's aired on TBS a few times. Honestly, the part at the end with the train crashing [i think rolling on its side and smashing into several columns] was the main highlight. I hated the movie overall especially Woody Harrelson's character. Edited by Grand Concourse
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Interesting -- thanks this is all good info.

 

What are the toughest areas of the transit system to navigate with respect to control of the train? Are there specific sections of track that're notoriously tough?

 

 

not in the same way you have tough sections of mainline track.

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It's aired on TBS a few times. Honestly, the part at the end with the train crashing [i think rolling on its side and smashing into several columns] was the main highlight. I hated the movie overall especially Woody Harrelson's character.

 

 

Oh man, you ruined the movie for me! (Just kidding)

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The closest thing to a "runaway train" to take place in the subway is probably the Malbone Street wreck.

 

Was that the 2007 R42 accident?

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Was that the 2007 R42 accident?

 

 

No... 1916 crash @ Prospect Park that killed over 100 people...

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Was that the 2007 R42 accident?

 

The Op meant trains where they are passengers on them not relays or lay ups..

 

You can say the Willy B incident now for that matter...

 

Or use the Robert Ray Incident.......

 

Neither train got "far" though...

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The only way you can have a runaway would be if the air brakes were not working (Missing brake shoes or something :P), AND the handbrakes would have to not be working as well.

 

 

Because of that movie I have 2 questions pf my own..

 

1. is it possible to "bleed the brakes" of a moving train?

2. that whole scene where they threw the train in reverse and it just started cartwheeling down the track. Can you actually throw it in reverse as an emergency way of stopping a train?

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1. is it possible to "bleed the brakes" of a moving train?

 

yes, and you'd come to a dead stop.

 

2. that whole scene where they threw the train in reverse and it just started cartwheeling down the track. Can you actually throw it in reverse as an emergency way of stopping a train?

 

 

I think the "traction motors have a heart attack" line sound about right.

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