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Minato ku

Paris metro and other network

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16px-Logo_train_transilien.svg.png16px-Logo_Paris_Transilien_ligneH.svg.pn  Enghien-les-Bains

Enghien-les-Bains is a northwestern suburbs with a little lake and the closest casino of Central Paris.

The train station opened in 1846 but the actual  building was build during the 1930's. The station is located at 11.4km (7.1 miles) of Gare du Nord terminal.

Enghien-les-Bains station is served by 8 trains per hour in rush hours and 4tph in offpeak by the suburban network H.

 

Z50000 stock

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In few year, Z50000 will become the largest stock of the non-RER suburban trains.

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Like many stations of the SNCF network, Enghien-les-Bains has low platforms

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Z50000 have gap fillers

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16px-Metro-M.svg.png16px-Paris_m_1_jms.svg.png  Esplanade de La Défense 

Esplanade de La Défense is one of two metro stations that opened in 1992 in the district of La Défense (the largest concentration of skyscrapers in Western Europe) located in the west of Paris.

The station has two tracks one island platform, it was build in a space planned for the A14 highway, highway which was later downsized.

Metro line 1 was planned to go to La Défense since the planning of the district in the 1950's and even before, its previous terminal stop Pont de Neuilly was just at the oposite bank of the Seine river. Spaces have been reserved for two stations but those spaces have never been used. 

Instead of running under the Seine river and under the ground as it was planned first, the metro crosses the Seine river in the middle of a bridge. Infact Esplanade de la Défense station is at the ground level but under a big concrete slab.

Note that pretty much the whole district is located on a pedestrian concrete slab with highways, streets, parking space, metro and many other fallities under it.

 

With the automation of the line, Esplanade de la Défense has been equipped with platform doors in October 2009.

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Approaching Esplanade de La Défense 

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Esplanade de La Défense had 8,721,277 entries in 2011.

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16px-Metro-M.svg.png16px-Paris_m_2_jms.svg.png  Ternes

The station opened in 1902.

There is nothing much to say about this station, it is a typical curved station.

Before September  2007 it had a carrossage (metal paneling) style (see post #128).

The station has been renovated at the end of the 2000's and has the Bruno-Gaudin style found in most stations renovated since the end of the 1990's.

This style mostly use the original decoration of the station with the white beveled tiles.

Those tites were first used because they reflect quite well the light at a time where the lighting system was quite insufficient.

 

Bruno-Gaudin style is easy to recognize because of the lighting system in a wide wave-shaped reflecting surface.

While the Bruno-Gaudin style with its white beveled tiles and the lighting scheme offers very bright stations, the generalisation of this style standardize too much the stations.

We used to have more diversity of styles and colors in the past (see post #120 with Mouton Duvernet style).

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Ternes had 3,930,362 entries in 2011.

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To finish about this station

 

16px-Metro-M.svg.png16px-Paris_m_6_jms.svg.png La Motte-Picquet - Grenelle

The platforms of the line 6 opened in 1906 as the line 2 south, this line became the line 5 in 1907.

With the big rerouting between the lines 5 and 6 due to the northern extension of the line 5 in 1942, the station is now served by the line 6.

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Almost half of the line 6 is elevated while over 90% of Paris metro network is underground.

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Elevated line 6 bridge just before the station, infact I am just standing above the line 8 and 10 platforms, you can see one of the entrance of the station.

 

This is a very old but well maintained station, it opened in 1906-1907? 

 

The architecture of the station with the canopy roofs really reminds me of the now defunct and demolished Brooklyn Bridge Station on the BRT (the predecessor of the BMT, pre-Dual Contracts) Very classical and intriguing design. It used to feed IIRC into the 5th Ave elevated and the Fulton St elevated. The BMT 4th Ave line did not exist yet (opened in 1915) when the photo was taken, in 1907.

 

Here, compare the similarities

 

https://thaiphong.wordpress.com/2012/06/14/more-historic-photos-from-the-nyc-municipal-archives/

 

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This is a very old but well maintained station, it opened in 1906-1907? 

The year of opening is 1906.

Indeed there is some similarity.

When does Brooklyn Bridge Station opened ?

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The year of opening is 1906.

Indeed there is some similarity.

When does Brooklyn Bridge Station opened ?

 

The Park Row station via the Brooklyn Bridge was opened in 1883 as part of the Kings County Elevated railroad. The BRT aquired the railroad and the station in 1898. At that time it was the only link to Manhattan by mass transit until 1908 (don't quote me on this, trying to run out of the IT department here and clock out, lol) when the IRT started operation of the East River tubes into Brooklyn's Alantic Avenue from the currently in revenue service Lafayette St/Lexington Ave line on the (4)(5)(6). (The IRT's first subway opened in 1904 but not to Brooklyn)

Edited by realizm
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Thank you. 

 

16px-RER.svg.png16px-Paris_rer_B_jms.svg.png Port-Royal

The station opened in 1895 with the extension of the suburban railway Sceaux line from Denfert-Rochereau (former terminal) to Luxembourg closer in Central Paris.

Port-Royal is the first station built under the ground in Paris with Luxembourg but unlike Luxembourg, Port Royal is not fully covered.

The line de Sceaux became the RER B when the line was extended to Chatelet-les-Halles in 1977.

 

Port-Royal has had a terrorist attack on December 3, 1996, it killed 8 and wounded 170.

This is the last major terrorist bombing that happened in Paris.

 

Entrance

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Port-Royal had 3,242,096 entries in 2011.

Edited by Minato ku
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16px-Metro-M.svg.png16px-Paris_m_3_jms.svg.png  Porte de Bagnolet

The station opened in 1971

While many new stations opened during the 1970's, Porte de Bagnolet is only full single-vault station build in this decade. 

Infact until 1998 with the opening of the line 14,  there were almost no single-vaulted station built in Paris metro network after 1971. 

Two exceptions, the southern half of the line 13 platforms of Champs Elysées Clemenceau and the line 13 northbound platform of Invalides.

 

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Porte de Bagnolet had 4,751,655 entries in 2011

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Some buses in Central Paris

Renault Agora (line 94: Levallois - Gare Montparnasse)

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Man Lion's City G (line number and direction plannel not working) (line 80: Porte de Versailles - Jules Joffrin Mairie du 18e)

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Irisbus Citelis line (line 22: Porte de Saint-Cloud - Opéra) followed by a Man Lion's City G (line 43: Neuilly - Gare du Nord)

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Irisbus Citelis 12 (line 32: Porte d'Auteuil - Gare de l'Est)

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BONUS: Irisbus Citelis 12 (line 32) and Man Lion's City G (line 43) a bit further in the east.

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Edited by Minato ku
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16px-Metro-M.svg.png16px-Paris_m_6_jms.svg.png Charles de Gaulle - Étoile

The station and the platform of the line 6 opened in 1900, at the beginning it was a branch of the line 1.

Charles de Gaulle - Étoile is the western terminal of the line 6, the station located in a loop, unlike any other station has only one tracks surrounded by two platforms on each side of the single track.

One platform is for boarding and the other is for unloading. 

Track map of the station

 

While Charles de Gaulle - Étoile is officially the western terminal stop ,of the line, in reality all the terminal station facilities are located at Kléber, the  following station.

It is at Kléber that drivers changes.

 

Charles de Gaulle - Étoile is a major metro station hub of the west of Central Paris, the station is served by tthe metro lines 1, 2 and 6 and the RER A.
The station is located in the CBD at the west end of the Champs Elysees under the big traffic circle plaza where is located the Arc de Triomphe.
 
The boarding platform of line 6 provides a "cross-platform" interchange with the line 1 eastbound or the opposite as this "cross platform" interchange is only accessible for people coming from line 1.
It is not visible in the picture because the platform of line 1 is right behind the wall on the right of the two first pictures but even if there is a wall between the two platforms there are some accesses.

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Charles de Gaulle Etoile had 8,980,015 entries in 2011 excluding transfer from the RER.
Over 20 million entries including transfer from the RER.
Edited by Minato ku
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16px-RER.svg.png16px-Paris_rer_A_jms.svg.png 

Thanks to SACEM signalling system, trains can get very close of each other.

SACEM is a system of cab signalling combining automatic train protection and automatic train operation introduced in 1989 in the central section of the RER A to increase the number and the speed of train.

Train drivers receive information in their cabs that give the speed to travel, they don't rely on the trackside signals. This allow allows trains to operate much closer together.

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16px-Metro-M.svg.png16px-Paris_m_4_jms.svg.pngPorte d’Orléans

The station opened in 1909 and until the end of March 2013 with the opening of Mairie de Montrouge, it was the southern terminal stop of the line 4.

The station has three tracks and two platforms,  it is followed by a loop to reverse trains that was used until the extension.

 

This was my station until the last month, I liked its columns but I disliked its very long corridors.

The station has very long corridors because Porte d’Orléans is also a major big bus  terminal with 20 lines and it is served by the T3a tram line.

 

Former arrival platform, now this is Montrouge bound platform. 

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Former departure platforms, now northbound.

Before the main departing track was the one on the right where the loop is heading, this track is now only used for storage and is no longer connected to the northern side of the line.

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A second ticket hall and two new entrances and lifts are under in construction is the north side of the station. The opening is planned for 2014

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Porte d’Orléans had 9 598 097 entries in 2011.

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I'm catching on to the fact that the Paris Metro is expanding with alot of major construction work being done in the city. Looks like they have the money to fund this.

 

Let me ask you a question.

 

How is the Paris Metro funded?

 

Do they get their share from the city and government as the MTA here with or without the political drama?

 

Do they face the same problems politically with the funding from the French government and Paris like how we are dealing with here in NYC and the MTA with their problems with the grants from Albany? (New York State government) and the US federal government 

 

Do they face opposition where it comes to expansion projects from elitist special interest groups much like our beloved NIMBYS (sarcastically speaking) here in NYC as far as the MTA and their expansion proposals as well?

 

I'm trying to understand the political involvement where it comes to how the projects and payroll is funded in the Paris Metro. I'm assuming the problems are not as much as the drama the MTA faces here in the US in NYC with the nonsense courtesy of idiot politicians locally in New York State, even the state governor, and even the federal government, who obviously has the money but rather waste it on defense spending and the like? 

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How Paris metro is funded. It is quite complicated.

A mix of national, regional, departemental, transport company and municipal funds.

It is not all glorious and there is many rivalities that lead to slow down many projects, especially when the national and regional governments are not on the same wing.

There is even some rivalities between the regional government and the transport company. 

 

I don't have enough information on how will be financed the 200km extension of Paris metro but I can give you detail about previous extensions.

 

The extension to Mairie de Montrouge that opened the last month.

42%: Ile de France (Region)

24%: State (Note that France is not a federal country, there is only one single State covering all the territory, so the State funding in France is comparable to the Federal funding in USA)

17%: RATP (transportation company)

14%: Hauts de Seine (Departement)

3%: Montrouge (Municipality)

 

The extension to Front Populaire that opened last December

48%: Ile de France

27%: State

16%: RATP

8%: Seine Seine Denis (Departement)

Edited by Minato ku
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Gotcha.

 

Looking at the percentages it doesn't look as bad as with the MTA. Major problems here.

 

As you well know recently the latest scam from Albany to shaft the MTA presumably leading up to a fare hike was this: The $143 million reduction in transit recently back in March was actually because Albany took transit tax revenues from the MTA and redirected them to the state's general fund. So in effect, Albany literally stole $118 million from transit in order to subsidize the rest of the state budget. Which is ridiculous in my opinion.

 

No wonder we share a dismal record in terms of expansion projects in comparison to say Paris Metro or KAIST in Korea. Among other reasons. Let me throw in the fact this has always been the problem since this system was built. Cockblocking from the state capitol.

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16px-Tramway-T.svg.png16px-Logo_Paris_tram_ligne2.svg.png16px-RER.svg.png16px-Paris_rer_C_jms.svg.png Issy-Val de Seine

Issy-Val de Seine opened in 1902 as Issy-Plaine in the Moulineaux line between Saint Lazare in Central Paris and Issy. The station was also located in the Invalides line but it is only latter that the train between of the Invalides line between Invalides in Central Paris and Versailles Rive Gauche station.

In 1933, the Moulineaux line become an independant line between Issy-Plaine and Puteaux.

The Invalides line was modernized in 1979 and became part of the RER C in 1980.

The Moulineaux line was converted into a light rail tram line in 1997 and became the T2. I wrote a post about the T2 (post #51).

 

Until 2009 Issy-Val de Seine was the southern terminal stop of the T2.

 

RER and T2 trains

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T2 platforms

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RER C platforms

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The former connection between the two lines

The T2 tracks are in the left and the RER C tracks are in the right behind the glass.

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Edited by Minato ku
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Lucky shot!

 

With a little patience !  :D  Anyway trains are frequent.

 

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Working in the subway can be dangerous. 

I don't know exactly what these workers were doing, they looked the track with xenon flashlights

A third worker (not visible on the image) was here for the safety. 

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16px-Metro-M.svg.png16px-Paris_m_13_jms.svg.png Liège

The station opened in 1911 in the Nord Sud (North-South) network line B that latter become the line 13 when Nord Sud was absorbed by the main metro network.

The station was built with staggered platforms because the street above is not wide enough to accommodate a normal sized station.

Liège was initially called Berlin but the station (and the nearby street) was renamed Liège at the beginning of the WW1 to commemorate the Battle of Liège and especially the Belgium resistance to the German.

 

At the beginning of the WW2 the station was closed, it only reopened in 1968 with limited opening hours, the station closure hour was at 8pm and it was closed the Sunday and for Holiday. It is only since December 2006 that Liège has normal operation time. This change was done after a big renovation of the station.

 

The decoration was put in 1982, it is ceramic made in Belgium which show landscape of Liège region.

Platform doors have been installed in early 2012. It was not necessary in this lightly used station but they put it in every stations on the central Paris section of line 13 to have an homogeneity of the infrascture.

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Liège had 1,731,063 entries in 2011.

This makes Liège the second last busy station of the line 13.

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It makes the platform safer in crowded circumstance, it also decrease the number of trespass on tracks. I can't count the number of time my commute has been delayed because of somebody in the tracks.

The bad point is that it makes railfanning a bit more difficult because it is less easy to take pictures of trains.

 

There can still be some incidents even with the platform doors. Last week somebody threw a bed on the track of the line 1.

It was in an underground station and platform doors are 5'7" high, so it was done intentionally.  :angry: 

 

Some pictures during the installation of the platform doors.

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Blinking blue lights for noticing the gap in curved stations, there is also some noise.

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16px-Logo_train_transilien.svg.png16px-Logo_Paris_Transilien_ligneL.svg.pn Bécon-les-Bruyères

The station is located on the L suburban network of Saint-Lazare in the western inner suburbs of Courbevoie, it opened in 1892.

Bécon-les-Bruyères has been bombed in 1943 during the WW2 and was latter modernized in 1969.

 

A new modernization is planned for the opening of line 15 of Paris metro, the new metro line will have a station here.

 

Bécon-les-Bruyères is at the junction of the group II and group II of the L network.

The group II (Saint-Lazare - Saint Cloud - Versailles Rive Gauche or Saint-Nom-la-Bretèche ) and group III (Saint Lazare - Nanterre Université - Cergy-Le Haut).

While all the group III trains stop at Bécon-les-Bruyères, only the local service (Saint-Lazare - Saint Cloud) of group II stop here.

 

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I saw a picture of Mairie de Montrouge on the net and it's so beautiful. The ceiling reminds me of a cafe restaurant and the walls are very modern, indeed. 

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16px-Metro-M.svg.png16px-Paris_m_10_jms.svg.png Église d'Auteuil

This is the station with the lowest number of entry in the network.

Église d'Auteuil opened in 1913 with the name Wilhem, it was renamed in 1921 with its actual name. The line was at first served by the line 8 before a big rerouting in 1937 (see post #165) when this section was transferred to line 10.

Église d'Auteuil is located in the west side of the line 10 in a section where the westbound and eastbound are split and don't serve the same stations as the result Église d'Auteuil has only one platform and it is served by westbound train to Boulogne.

Before the extension to Boulogne in 1980, this section was a loop.

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Map of the track in the link

The low number of entry can be explained by the fact that the station is only served by trains going to the periphery (Église d'Auteuil is only at four stops of the terminal station), so people tend to take subway at the station with trains going to the center.

This means that Église d'Auteuil has a higher number of people exiting because the trains are coming from the center, an easy way to prove this theory is the fact that the station has two exits but only one entrance.

 

Welcome in Auteuil in the posh 16th arrondissement

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In 2011, Église d'Auteuil had 178,152 entries.

Edited by Minato ku
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RATP bus line 183

With 57,000 passengers per day, this is one of the busiest bus line in the RATP network. 

The line is 16.5km (10.2 mile) long with 35 stops, it links Porte de Choisy in inner Paris with Orly airport in southeast suburbs.

Only a minority of the services goes to the airport, most stop at Choisy le Roi in inner suburbs or Mairie d'Orly, the town center of the suburbs of Orly.

The line is segregated of the car traffic in in a big part of its route, it can be see as a BRT at least in the busiest part.

 

Because of its high traffic, the line will be replaced with a tram by 2020.

The tram will run between Porte de Choisy and Orly town center.

No number is assigned yet but it is likely to become the T9 or 10.

This new tram line will be 10km (6.2 miles) long with 20 stations and will carry between 70,000 and 80,000 passenger.

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Porte de Choisy, the northern terminal stop in inner Paris. 

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At Porte de Choisy, the line has connection with the Tram T3a and the Metro line 7.

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Man Lion's City G

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Edited by Minato ku
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