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itmaybeokay

What generally are the "mechanical problems"?

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The other morning the (1) train I was on crawled through 96th st, and there was a (2) train on the express track stopped halfway out of the station. When I looked out the window I saw the TO and CR looking around the bottom of the train with flashlights.

 

A check later of email alerts revealed that (2) and (3) services were delayed due to "a train with mechanical problems at 96th st". This got me thinking - commonly, what are the mechanical problems? And can the train crew usually fix them on their own, or are there other procedures and or teams in place for this?

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Usually I believe they are cases of BIE (Brakes in Emergency). I believe they are fixed by recharging the train.

 

 

That makes sense.

 

I wonder if anyone has any idea what would have them looking around under the train with flashlights? I doubt they had a flat tire :D

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If it can go wrong with the train (insert any given Murphy's Law), effecting the operation and doesn't involve a passenger injury its a Mechanical Problem.

 

Examples; Brake Pipe rupture, signal malfunction, Train Operator malfunction, rail car separation, NTT computer failure (its happened to me), track debris...

Edited by FriedChikkin
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The vast majority of "mechanical problems" is BIE's and side door problems.

 

The side door problems are usually remedied within five minutes (which is why I hate use of this term, one could read mechanical problem and search for a reroute when they could have stayed put if it was a door problem), the BIE's come in two varieties: the train doesn't recharge when an attempt is done and it does.

 

Of the BIE's It's a blessing when it doesn't recharge, as 90% of those times its a pulled cord somewhere. The pulled cords are resolved within ten minutes, because the crew only has to investigate until the cord is found, and its the entire crew. Once it is found, investigation done, move the train. When its not a pulled cord, its a "legit" rupture of the brake pipe or a offset trip valve, and those are a pain, and the train will take up to 30 mins or more to move (a whole process has to be done to make the pipe whole again).

 

Of those BIE's when it does recharge, its much worse. it could be a hit signal the T/O didn't notice (sometimes), a signal stop arm up under the train (sometimes), or debris on the tracks (rarely) which include 12-9s. In each of those instances, the T/O must investigate the full length of the train and the amount of distance behind it it took to stop, which depends on how fast he was going when the train went BIE. The TA wants you to bang yourself in when you legitimately hit the signal (whether its T/O error or not), as you won't have to investigate much (only making sure the stop arm is down so it doesnt dump again when you move). These can last a variety of times due to their uncertain nature as to the cause. These are a pain.

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The vast majority of "mechanical problems" is BIE's and side door problems.

 

The side door problems are usually remedied within five minutes (which is why I hate use of this term, one could read mechanical problem and search for a reroute when they could have stayed put if it was a door problem), the BIE's come in two varieties: the train doesn't recharge when an attempt is done and it does.

 

Of those BIE's when it does recharge, its much worse. it could be a hit signal the T/O didn't notice (sometimes), a signal stop arm up under the train (sometimes), or debris on the tracks (rarely) which include 12-9s. In each of those instances, the T/O must investigate the full length of the train and the amount of distance behind it it took to stop, which depends on how fast he was going when the train went BIE. The TA wants you to bang yourself in when you legitimately hit the signal (whether its T/O error or not), as you won't have to investigate much (only making sure the stop arm is down so it doesnt dump again when you move). These can last a variety of times due to their uncertain nature as to the cause. These are a pain.

 

 

5th Ave N/B on that (E) cho!!!!!!!!!!! :ph34r::ph34r::ph34r::ph34r::ph34r::ph34r::ph34r::ph34r:

Edited by RTOMan

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The last time my train went BIE, we discovered the cause of it to be a bottle of soda which was filled with urine, recapped, and thrown out the window by our leader's C/R, which landed next to the tracks and weighed just enough to trip the CBTD.

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The last time my train went BIE, we discovered the cause of it to be a bottle of soda which was filled with urine, recapped, and thrown out the window by our leader's C/R, which landed next to the tracks and weighed just enough to trip the CBTD.

 

 

I'm laffing my a** off! Does that really do it though. Urine must have some high density.

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The last time my train went BIE, we discovered the cause of it to be a bottle of soda which was filled with urine, recapped, and thrown out the window by our leader's C/R, which landed next to the tracks and weighed just enough to trip the CBTD.

 

wow there is a change of scenery right there

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The last time my train went BIE, we discovered the cause of it to be a bottle of soda which was filled with urine, recapped, and thrown out the window by our leader's C/R, which landed next to the tracks and weighed just enough to trip the CBTD.

 

Do to the possibility of this happening I never, ever throw those bottles out the windows... ever. Oh, and what's CBTD? You mean CBTC?

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