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BrooklynIRT

"next train forward cars" at E 241 St-White Plains Rd

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why is/was there a sign there that said "forward cars"? I suppose the objective was to get people to go towards the front since the front cars are closer to the crew than the rear cars and so that the north end of the platform would not become flooded with passengers. or I bet it has something to do with the fact that there is only one staircase (often congested) b/w the platform and mezzanine

 

http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?47227

Edited by BrooklynIRT

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why is/was there a sign there that said "forward cars"? I suppose the objective was to get people to go towards the front since the front cars are closer to the crew than the rear cars and so that the north end of the platform would not become flooded with passengers. or I bet it has something to do with the fact that there is only one staircase (often congested) b/w the platform and mezzanine

 

http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?47227

 

I dunno if you're right, but if you are, question answered lol.

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I guess the same reason people have to move to the back of the bus as much as possible when it's crowded?

 

 
 
 
 
 
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why is/was there a sign there that said "forward cars"? I suppose the objective was to get people to go towards the front since the front cars are closer to the crew than the rear cars and so that the north end of the platform would not become flooded with passengers. or I bet it has something to do with the fact that there is only one staircase (often congested) b/w the platform and mezzanine

 

http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?47227

Sometimes so that the train crew has some room for people at the other stops to board.

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why is/was there a sign there that said "forward cars"? I suppose the objective was to get people to go towards the front since the front cars are closer to the crew than the rear cars and so that the north end of the platform would not become flooded with passengers. or I bet it has something to do with the fact that there is only one staircase (often congested) b/w the platform and mezzanine

 

http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?47227

 

Those signs were in use when short trains ran regularly (aside from late nights). One short train might be laid up in the station with another train boarding at the other end of the platform, and that sign was illuminated to inform people that they needed to walk to the front ("forward") end of the platform to reach the train that would actually leave the station.

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Uhmhmmmmm no. That sign is indicating that this is the direction that the front of the train will depart from.

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Uhmhmmmmm no. That sign is indicating that this is the direction that the front of the train will depart from.

 

are you saying that the sign is there just to tell people where the front of the southbound train is?

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Uhmhmmmmm no. That sign is indicating that this is the direction that the front of the train will depart from.

 

Then why would it be an illuminated sign, and why would it only appear at terminals?

 

I'm telling you the way the sign used to be used: to inform riders that only the "forward" half of (what appeared to be) the train would actually be departing the terminal.

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It could be used for both actually. Like what they do at Dyre now, when they cut the train into two 5 car sets. However it is not, as the OP suggested, used to encourage people to ride in the front car. The front and rear cars (especially on the (C) ) tend to be the MOST crowded cars on the train, so that's something that should actually be DIScouraged.

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It could be used for both actually. Like what they do at Dyre now, when they cut the train into two 5 car sets. However it is not, as the OP suggested, used to encourage people to ride in the front car. The front and rear cars (especially on the (C) ) tend to be the MOST crowded cars on the train, so that's something that should actually be DIScouraged.

So which cars tend to be the emptiest?? I always thought people packed into that middle car with the conductor... I always prefer the last car usually because it's emptier because folks are too lazy to walk... 

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It could be used for both actually. Like what they do at Dyre now, when they cut the train into two 5 car sets. However it is not, as the OP suggested, used to encourage people to ride in the front car. The front and rear cars (especially on the (C) ) tend to be the MOST crowded cars on the train, so that's something that should actually be DIScouraged.

 

I think the crowding of each car really depends on the line and where the train is along the line. at least on the (1)(2)(3)(5) I never see more people in the back than in the middle except near terminals. when the train is in midtown the middle will be more crowded b/c the conductor is there and entrances are at the middle of the platform at most IRT stations, but the front gets more crowded as you get closer to the terminal b/c most terminals have exits at the front of the terminating train (VCP, Woodlawn, Pelham, Utica, Flatbush, New Lots, 148). it varies quite a bit in my opinion.

 

I originally mentioned passengers being closer to the crew mainly for safety reasons (faster response time if a passenger has an emergency or witnesses one and the crew needs to get to that passenger's car or whatever)

Edited by BrooklynIRT
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It's been a while since I worked the A-Div. Yeah, most of those elevated stations in the Bronx have their exit right at the C/R position. However in the IND most stations were designed with a front and rear exit, both at the extreme end of the platform, which can be a real PITA when working the (C) since the majority of passengers who don't know any better (particularly at Spring, 23, Ralph, etc) are waiting too far forward or backward from the 8 car stopping position and go running into the very first or last door, even if there's already a mob to get through it.

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So which cars tend to be the emptiest?? I always thought people packed into that middle car with the conductor... I always prefer the last car usually because it's emptier because folks are too lazy to walk... 

 

It depends entirely on where the exits on the line happen to be. On the L heading into or out of Manhattan, the northernmost cars are by far the most crowded, since several heavy stations have busy exits at that end of the train - Lorimer, Bedford, 1st, 3rd, and 6th.

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You know what absolutely drives me crazy? 79 St on the (D) is the busiest local stop on the West End. It has two staircases and EVERY SINGLE CUSTOMER who gets off at that station exits through the door closest to either staircase, which often creates a bottleneck where the staircases are backed up to the door and people "can't" get off the train because they are too stubborn to walk 8 feet to the next set of doors.

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It's been a while since I worked the A-Div. Yeah, most of those elevated stations in the Bronx have their exit right at the C/R position. However in the IND most stations were designed with a front and rear exit, both at the extreme end of the platform, which can be a real PITA when working the (C) since the majority of passengers who don't know any better (particularly at Spring, 23, Ralph, etc) are waiting too far forward or backward from the 8 car stopping position and go running into the very first or last door, even if there's already a mob to get through it.

Its amusing to watch it at Broadway Junction, epically when the R42s made their last tour of duty out there and there's people in a mad dash to catch the train.

 

...then the door closes in their faces

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Yeah, now Broadway Jct is a station with signs that DO encourage customers to spread out on the platform. But nope, most of them still try to squeeze through the last door (even if it means waiting in a line) while there are 31 other doors waiting to accommodate them. Same at Franklin Ave

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So which cars tend to be the emptiest?? I always thought people packed into that middle car with the conductor... I always prefer the last car usually because it's emptier because folks are too lazy to walk... 

 

At least on the (7), the front and back cars of a train are always the most crowded, since most, if not all of its Queens stations have only a front and a back exit. (Main St has a middle exit, but it's only accessible from the front or the back of the platforms.) Most IND stations also have only front and end exits (despite the full mezzanine), and some, but not all old IRT stops have only center exits (96th St on the (6), anyone?)

 

The problem with two exits is something the MTA probably needs to remedy as population increases along the (7), because even stations like Main St and 74th only have two points to exit and enter the platforms from. 74th can get dangerously crowded when service disruptions occur, and that eastern exit at the end of the (7) platform may have been the most useless new exit ever designed (it dumps you into a residential area with bus stands for two infrequent feeders and the Q12, when a far more useful exit could've been built at Kissena and Main, where all the Jamaica-Flushing buses are.)

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are you saying that the sign is there just to tell people where the front of the southbound train is?

Probably, look at penn station for example.

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At least on the (7), the front and back cars of a train are always the most crowded, since most, if not all of its Queens stations have only a front and a back exit. (Main St has a middle exit, but it's only accessible from the front or the back of the platforms.) Most IND stations also have only front and end exits (despite the full mezzanine), and some, but not all old IRT stops have only center exits (96th St on the (6), anyone?)

 

The problem with two exits is something the MTA probably needs to remedy as population increases along the (7), because even stations like Main St and 74th only have two points to exit and enter the platforms from. 74th can get dangerously crowded when service disruptions occur, and that eastern exit at the end of the (7) platform may have been the most useless new exit ever designed (it dumps you into a residential area with bus stands for two infrequent feeders and the Q12, when a far more useful exit could've been built at Kissena and Main, where all the Jamaica-Flushing buses are.)

Yeah I've used the Main St station before... Pretty big stop to say the least...

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