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Metro CSW

CTA seeks builder for 7000-series Rail cars

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The Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) is seeking manufacturers for a brand-new generation of rail cars, the 7000 series, continuing the agency's efforts to modernize the transit system to improve service and benefit customers.

 

 

This week, the CTA issued an Invitation for Bids (IFB) for new rail cars that will offer customers a smoother, more comfortable ride. These rail cars, expected to begin delivery around 2016, will replace current rail stock that is nearing or beyond 30 years of age. Replacement of these aging cars will reduce service delays from mechanical breakdowns and save millions in operating costs. The project, if all options are exercised, would provide CTA with up to 846 new rail cars and have an estimated value of more than $2 billion.

The 7000 series will complement the new 5000 series cars currently being used on three CTA rail lines. In late 2011, the CTA nearly doubled its order for those state-of-the-art cars, bringing the total order to 706 cars. Approximately 190 of the 5000 series have arrived to date, with new rail cars arriving at a rate of one per weekday.

The 7000 series purchase will allow for continuous replacement of CTA's aging rail fleet—departing from past practice of waiting as much as 20 years between rail car orders. The CTA anticipates the new 7000 series cars will begin arriving shortly after the last 5000 is delivered.

"Having world-class public transportation is essential for any world-class city," said Mayor Rahm Emanuel. "This is not just an investment in our rail system but in our neighborhoods. By strengthening our transportation we will continue Chicago's economic growth and increase the quality of life for all residents."

The 7000 series would replace the oldest rail cars in the CTA's fleet, potentially reducing the average age of the CTA's fleet to less than 10 years by 2022. Without the purchase of new rail cars, the average age of the fleet will be greater than 20 years by that time. The CTA fleet currently consists of approximately 1,280 rail cars.

"The CTA is continuing its aggressive plan of investment and modernization of the nation's second-largest mass transit system, benefiting our customers and the regional economy, which depends on a vibrant, modern transit system," said Claypool. "Under Mayor Emanuel, the CTA is undertaking a massive and timely replacement of both bus and rail fleets, which includes replacing aging vehicles, improving passenger comfort and service reliability."

With the base order and options exercised, the CTA would replace its oldest rail cars, including the approximately 400 30-year-old 2600 series, built between 1981 and 1987. Additional, later-year options could allow for the timely replacement of the 256 cars in the 3200 series, which are currently 20 years old. In addition, the CTA could expand its rail fleet if ridership trends or system expansion warrants.

The 7000 series bidders will submit exterior and interior design proposals, consisting of design options such as seating configuration and aesthetic design to ensure the new cars best meet CTA's requirements.

 

Specifications:

Built by: to be determined
Year: 2016-2022 (planned)
Length: 48'-0"
Width at Floor: 8'-8"
Width at Windows: 9'-4"
Height over Roof: 12'-0"
Trucks: to be determined
Truck centers: 33' 8"
Truck wheelbase: 6' 6"
Coupler: #1 end / #2 end: Form 5 / tubular
Wheel diameter: 28"
Seats: 38 minimum, exact number to be determined
Weight (w/o passengers): to be determined
Motors per car: to be determined
Balancing speed: to be determined
Governed speed: to be determined

.

History:

On February 6, 2013, CTA President Forrest Claypool announced that the CTA was seeking manufacturers for a brand-new generation of railcars. The CTA issued an Invitation for Bids (IFB) for up to 846 new rail cars, which were dubbed the 7000-series in the bid documents. The procurement of the 7000-series railcars was intended to continue the agency's efforts to modernize the transit system to improve service and benefit customers. The cars are intended to replace rail stock that was nearing or beyond 30 years of age, with replacement of the aging cars reducing service delays from mechanical breakdowns and saving millions of dollars in operating costs.

The IFB broke the procurement into a base order and eight options, totalling 846 cars. The base order is or 100 cars, while options 1 through 8 are for 50 cars, 50 cars, 100 cars, 100 cars, 156 cars, 100 cars, 100 cars, and 90 cars, respectivelty. At the time the IFB was issued, CTA expected to begin taking delivery of the new cars around 2016. The 7000-series would replace the oldest rail cars in the CTA's fleet -- the remaining 400 cars of the 2600-series from the mid-1980s and the 256 1991-94-built 3200-series cars -- potentially reducing the average age of the CTA's fleet to less than 10 years by 2022. In addition, the size and number of options in the potential 7000-series car contract would allow the CTA to expand its rail fleet if ridership trends or system expansion warrants. The purchase of the 7000-series cars during the delivery of the 5000-series cars, and beginning their delivery shortly after the last 5000 is delivered, would allow for the continuous replacement of CTA's entire aging rail fleet, departing from 20 years between railcar orders that took place between the purchase of the 3200s and 5000s The exterior and inside design of the 7000-series was not set by the IFB documents and specifications. Bidders were asked to submit exterior and interior design proposals, consisting of design options such as seating configuration and aesthetic design to ensure the new cars best meet CTA's requirements. The requirement that bidders submit design proposals that may differ from CTA's current railcar aesthetics and configuration comes after a mixed reaction from the public to the 5000-series cars' mostly aisle-facing seating, a seating configuration absent from Chicago rapid transit cars for several decades until the 5000s delivery. CTA said they would survey passengers about their preferences, and conduct research examining how different designs affect the time it takes passengers to board and exit trains. The 7000-series cars will be able to couple mechanically with the 2600-, 3200- and 5000-series cars, but will only be able to trainline and operate in a train consist with the 5000-series cars. As such, the 7000's represent a continuation of the new family of cars that started with the 5000s.

If the options for all 846 railcars are exercised, the contract would have an estimated value of more than $2 billion. The base order of 100 7000-series cars would be paid for with federal money and CTA bond proceeds already in place when the IFB was issued. The balance of orders would be funded by future federal and state funding as money is secured, as well as with future bond proceeds. However, at the time the IFB was issued, CTA officials said they could not predict when enough money would be in hand to finance rail car orders totaling $2 billion.

 

Sources : Railwayrage and Chicago-L.org

 

Who would you choose?

Edited by Metro CSW
  • Upvote 2

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Well, that escalated quickly... replacement for the remaining 2400-series and 2600-series cars?

 

The remaining 2400's are already being replaced by the 5000 series order (714 total).

This is just to get rid of the 2600's (and maybe the 3200's even though those are supposedly getting rehab work done). 

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The remaining 2400's are already being replaced by the 5000 series order (714 total).

This is just to get rid of the 2600's (and maybe the 3200's even though those are supposedly getting rehab work done). 

It was planned that only half of the 3200-series may be replaced and the remaining to be retrofitted by the middle to end of the decade. Them 2600s may be say bye bye by 2021. This is unconfirmed information in which will change eventually depending on the award.... years away....

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It was planned that only half of the 3200-series may be replaced and the remaining to be retrofitted by the middle to end of the decade. Them 2600s may be say bye bye by 2021. This is unconfirmed information in which will change eventually depending on the award.... years away....

 

Wait until there's rehab work to complete before we can speculate any further about an order 10 years ahead.

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