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Turbo19

Bus drivers sue MTA for $30 million over sex-harasser supervisor

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New York Transport Workers Union employee Theresa Garcia is comforted by her fellow employees, including recent sexual harassment victim Nancy Jenkins, as she spoke about being kissed by TWU supervisor Earl Byron.

The MTA should take a $30 million hit for turning a blind eye to a serial sex-harasser, three bus drivers say.

 

In papers filed in Manhattan Supreme Court, Nancy Jenkins, Teresa Garcia and Stephanie Lopez say they were terrorized by bus supervisor Earl Bryan at the Kingsbridge Depot in the Bronx — but their bosses didn’t take action until his behavior got completely out of control.

 

Read More: NyDailyNews

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Opinions? I feel that this is just one example of harassment and/or discrimination going on behing the scenes of the MTA that has yet to reach the surface. Another recent example was the alleged discrimination of Sheikh Ahmed, which took place at the East New York depot.

 

I'm supporting the B/O's here 100%, no question.

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earl27n-2-web.jpg

New York Transport Workers Union employee Theresa Garcia is comforted by her fellow employees, including recent sexual harassment victim Nancy Jenkins, as she spoke about being kissed by TWU supervisor Earl Byron.

The MTA should take a $30 million hit for turning a blind eye to a serial sex-harasser, three bus drivers say.

 

In papers filed in Manhattan Supreme Court, Nancy Jenkins, Teresa Garcia and Stephanie Lopez say they were terrorized by bus supervisor Earl Bryan at the Kingsbridge Depot in the Bronx — but their bosses didn’t take action until his behavior got completely out of control.

 

Read More: NyDailyNews

im not familiar with the other 2 cases, but in the case of Nancy Jenkins, she waited too long to report it. Thats probably why nothing was done about it. Its most likely the same story with the other 2. MTA takes sexual harassment very seriously, and has a zero tolerance policy for even the smallest things. I've heard of guys getting suspended for telling off color jokes to each other while a female cleaner who was passing by, heard them and got offended. If the guy did something inappropriate to 3 different female employees, was reported, and still has his job, there has to be more to this story than what the press is reporting

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LMAO... The remarks that were supposedly made I believe happened too... And I'm not going to lie they are funny as hell.  :lol: That's why it's best to keep everything professional on the job... 

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This is one of those topics that (if my memory serves me correctly) we discussed when the issue was first raised a few months ago. 

 

Sexual harassment (or for that matter any form of harassment) is wrong period. This is what happens when management does not take the accusations seriously and deals with the issue at the beginning, not when it lands up in court.The problem here is that management does nothing at the iniital stage, letting it fester until it becomes a major court case which has happened here. Management has to make it clear to all employees that it will not be tolerated by the agency in any way shape or form.

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This is one of those topics that (if my memory serves me correctly) we discussed when the issue was first raised a few months ago. 

 

Sexual harassment (or for that matter any form of harassment) is wrong period. This is what happens when management does not take the accusations seriously and deals with the issue at the beginning, not when it lands up in court.The problem here is that management does nothing at the iniital stage, letting it fester until it becomes a major court case which has happened here. Management has to make it clear to all employees that it will not be tolerated by the agency in any way shape or form.

Yes, but at the risk of sounding like an a**hole (moreso than already) it is also up to the victim(s) to come forward and bring these issues to the surface. Think how much sooner the situation could have been handled if that had happened.

 

I'm not saying that the victim(s) is/are responsible, but action to remedy the situation could be done much sooner, thus benefiting them as well as others in the workforce.

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