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6 Lexington Ave

Terminal Timer Overkill?

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Sometimes, it seems to me that having so many timers in terminals doesn't actually have a point. I mean, i get that it's for protection but they (the timers) slow down the trains to an absurd point. They actually lower the terminal's TPH capacity in my opinion. Any thoughts/reasons why they are so annoying about this?

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If there are tail tracks past the terminal, the timers usually aren't that bad. If the track stub ends with a bumper just past the platform. (E.G. New south ferry), the timers are to keep the train from slamming into the bumper block with any significant speed, injuring thousands of people. 

 

It may lower the TPH, but it's a safety thing. 

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I find this to be extremely annoying at Far Rockaway-Mott Avenue. The train crawls into the station from the start at no more than 5mph, and it seems like it takes forever just for the train to pull in. I get it that it is bumper protection, but they can at least have 15mph timers in the first half of the station then decrease it as you get closer to the bumper block.

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I find this to be extremely annoying at Far Rockaway-Mott Avenue. The train crawls into the station from the start at no more than 5mph, and it seems like it takes forever just for the train to pull in. I get it that it is bumper protection, but they can at least have 15mph timers in the first half of the station then decrease it as you get closer to the bumper block.

 

I think after that Robert Ray incident, the MTA said bye bye to rapid transit.

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I find this to be extremely annoying at Far Rockaway-Mott Avenue. The train crawls into the station from the start at no more than 5mph, and it seems like it takes forever just for the train to pull in. I get it that it is bumper protection, but they can at least have 15mph timers in the first half of the station then decrease it as you get closer to the bumper block.

i noticed the same thing on the M train at metro

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I think after that Robert Ray incident, the MTA said bye bye to rapid transit.

I think that after any incident, they find a new place to install timers.
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On a different note, LIRR trains don't have timers at stub end stations. Engineers usually get one restricted signal entering the station.

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Timers are there for reasons... Just relax have a seat you will get to your destination!

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There are a few timers I can think of that don't really make a lot of sense.

 

Timers entering terminals ending in bumping blocks make.............wait for it....wait some more........ - A LOT of sense.

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Timers entering terminals ending in bumping blocks make.............wait for it....wait some more........ - A LOT of sense.

 

Totally agree..  Totally.

 

I mean whats the rush? If people need to get someplace just leave earlier!

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Oh BTW This is another reason why having timers in terminals helps..

 

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moorgate_tube_crash

 

Whoa, I hadn't heard about that one. What's interesting is the "Moorgate Protection" described in the article sounds EXACTLY like the terminal timers used here in NY. To quote:

 

 

This consists of a number of standard train stops, used to halt trains that pass red signals. One is installed at the entry to the station platform and one or more along the platform. The train stops are normally in the raised position. As a train approaches, it moves onto a section of track that initiates a time delay. At the conclusion of the delay, the train stop is lowered, allowing the train to pass. The time-delay is such that if the train is travelling faster than the design speed, its trip cock will hit the train stop before it lowers. This exhausts the air from the braking system applying the emergency brakes. The train stops remain in the lowered position while the train remains on the track section.

 

Before they instituted that system, the only protection at the end of the terminal track was a "sand-drag" system, and a hydraulic buffer stop. Even with those in place, when the train hit the buffers 42 were killed, and another 74 hospitalized

 

So, that's why we have the terminal timers.

 

 

Also, not for nothing, you kind of need the timers if your'e even going to follow the basic rules of fixed-block signaling. The trip-cock needs to be able to stop a train at speed, with any semblance of movable brakes, before it encounters the train ahead of it. Think of the bumper block as a permanent "Train": The only way a train can approach it would be either 1) Station Time - which is more or less exactly what's there, or since that's basically an occupied block 2) Key-by rules, which would in all likelyhood force the train to enter the station even slower than it already does. 

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