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Via Garibaldi 8

What is the standard workday for a B/O?

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I'm wondering about this because one of my B/O friends says he takes two days off but somehow he seems to work over 8 hours on the days that he works, yet he says he does the bare minimum and doesn't do overtime.  I never thought to ask him the particulars but it got me to thinking, so what exactly is the story?

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5 days working (hours worked depending on the run, not always 8 hours sometimes more sometimes less), then 2 straight days off

  • Upvote 1

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Yep, my Yukon B/O friend works Monday-Friday and his RDO is Saturday-Sunday. Now some B/O's don't always have the same RDOs; Some have Monday/Tuesday, Wednesday/Thurday, or even Sunday/Monday off.

Edited by S78 via Hylan

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Ah... So then that must mean that those hours balance out not to pay overtime then... Interesting... That really sucks though... Hard to get into a rhythm that way.

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Ah... So then that must mean that those hours balance out not to pay overtime then... Interesting... That really sucks though... Hard to get into a rhythm that way.

Overtime kicks in once your scheduled run is over.

 

Example...

 

Your run is scheduled to end at 11:47 pm. For whatever reason you pull into the depot late (long fuel line, break down, finished your run late) and you pull in at lets say 1:02 am, all that extra time is on overtime pay.

 

Working on your day off counts as overtime pay too (a driver can elaborate further on this one)

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Overtime kicks in once your scheduled run is over.

 

Example...

 

Your run is scheduled to end at 11:47 pm. For whatever reason you pull into the depot late (long fuel line, break down, finished your run late) and you pull in at lets say 1:02 am, all that extra time is on overtime pay.

 

Working on your day off counts as overtime pay too (a driver can elaborate further on this one)

Well yes.... That's why they'd rather have relief drivers take over a trip if the regular guy can't get down there quick enough.... 

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Let's put an end to the speculation shall we?

 

As per contract we are guaranteed 8 hours of pay and 5 days of work at the minimum, never less. To be specific your run can be 7 hours and 20 minutes but you would still be paid 8 hours (7 hours and 20 minutes of run pay and a 40 minute boost to equal 8 hours, however, let's say that your late on a run that pays a boost of 40 minutes you would have to be more than 40 minutes late to get a deviation report slip aka a cut slip to be paid overtime.  Anything less than the boost amount and they will only pay you 8 hours as the amount will be subtracted from your boost.  

 

As per contract 25% of scheduled runs have to be "swing" runs.  The contract defines a swing run as a run that pays more than 10 hours (I have to double check this as it's either 10 or 11).  Some depots are known to have more money runs than others.  For example, Manhattanville and Tuskegee Airmen are at the bottom of the barrel when it comes to "money" runs as most runs will only pay 40-42 hours opposed to say Gun Hill, West Farms and Kingsbridge where you'll have runs that pay 66 hours (the contract allows 67 hours to be the maximum amount of hours allotted to a run, the most I've seen on the board was 66 hours and 10 minutes and it was gone on the first day lol. I would also like to point out that if you pick over 55 hours you can only work 1 RDO [regular day off] every other week that way all the whiners on here don't think making $100,000 every year is so easy to do.  We can only work extra when there is a dire need for service i.e natural disasters, understaffed garage etc...) 

 

Reliefs and scheduled pull in/pull outs are prescribed by the authority in the schedules they create.  In some instances you will have unscheduled pull outs or drop outs along the line if the "crew" was unable to fill in a run which means that the relief operator won't be at the designated relief point so they either take the bus out of service there or ask the operator that is on the bus to continue in service and they will give them a deviation report slip for the extra service.

Edited by youngblaze
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Let's put an end to the speculation shall we?

 

As per contract we are guaranteed 8 hours of pay and 5 days of work at the minimum, never less. To be specific your run can be 7 hours and 20 minutes but you would still be paid 8 hours (7 hours and 20 minutes of run pay and a 40 minute boost to equal 8 hours, however, let's say that your late on a run that pays a boost of 40 minutes you would have to be more than 40 minutes late to get a deviation report slip aka a cut slip to be paid overtime.  Anything less than the boost amount and they will only pay you 8 hours as the amount will be subtracted from your boost.  

 

As per contract 25% of scheduled runs have to be "swing" runs.  The contract defines a swing run as a run that pays more than 10 hours (I have to double check this as it's either 10 or 11).  Some depots are known to have more money runs than others.  For example, Manhattanville and Tuskegee Airmen are at the bottom of the barrel when it comes to "money" runs as most runs will only pay 40-42 hours opposed to say Gun Hill, West Farms and Kingsbridge where you'll have runs that pay 66 hours (the contract allows 67 hours to be the maximum amount of hours allotted to a run, the most I've seen on the board was 66 hours and 10 minutes and it was gone on the first day lol. I would also like to point out that if you pick over 55 hours you can only work 1 RDO [regular day off] every other week that way all the whiners on here don't think making $100,000 every year is so easy to do.  We can only work extra when there is a dire need for service i.e natural disasters, understaffed garage etc...) 

 

Reliefs and scheduled pull in/pull outs are prescribed by the authority in the schedules they create.  In some instances you will have unscheduled pull outs or drop outs along the line if the "crew" was unable to fill in a run which means that the relief operator won't be at the designated relief point so they either take the bus out of service there or ask the operator that is on the bus to continue in service and they will give them a deviation report slip for the extra service.

I'm assuming that the contract is valid for all B/O's or is this just for NYCT and not (MTA) Bus? I ask because there are so many unions.  What about express bus trips?  I also don't understand what is considered "overtime"?  To make things simple, my idea of overtime would be any hours over 40.  

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I'm assuming that the contract is valid for all B/O's or is this just for NYCT and not (MTA) Bus? I ask because there are so many unions.  What about express bus trips?  I also don't understand what is considered "overtime"?  To make things simple, my idea of overtime would be any hours over 40.  

Yeah Overtime is over 40, 8 times 5 is 40. Some of the expresses (QM's) dont have layover in Manhattan, so how is that worked out when it comes to late runs and what not.

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I'm assuming that the contract is valid for all B/O's or is this just for NYCT and not (MTA) Bus? I ask because there are so many unions.  What about express bus trips?  I also don't understand what is considered "overtime"?  To make things simple, my idea of overtime would be any hours over 40.

Let's take this example from LGA, run 804 {Summer pick weekdays]

Report time is 5:12AM, two round trips on Q18 and pulls into the depot at 9:42. The B/O pulls out at 12:27 and works two round trips on Q47 and pulls into the depot at 3:44. The summary from the pick list shows:

Spread 10:22 (From report time to pull into time), Meal 2hr 45 minutes (9.42 to 12:27], Pd Swg 15 minutes, 8 minutes BST.

 

From the little I understand, swing is time the operator is at the depot waiting to pull out for the second time. In this case, the B/O pulled in at 9:42 and went back out at 12:27. But I guess the entire swing time isn't paid. [A QV B/O at last year's busfest told me that swing isn't paid anymore.]

 

Report time (5:12) to pull in (9:42) is 4 hours 30 minutes. Pull out (12:27) to pull in (3:44) is 3 hours 17 minutes. 4 hours 30 minutes + 3 hours 17 minutes= 7 hours 47 minutes. Minimum pay is 8 hours so I calculate boost at 13 minutes but the sheet shows 8 minutes. I must have made a mistake somewhere.

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Yeah Overtime is over 40, 8 times 5 is 40. Some of the expresses (QM's) dont have layover in Manhattan, so how is that worked out when it comes to late runs and what not.

This is what I'm still confused by.  So if a driver does 11 hours one day (on a run that actually pays 11 hours not because of anything else), is he or she still paid overtime on that day or how does that work? I mean in my case I work crazy hours but there is no overtime here so I get a bonus (or bonuses) based on performance during my review, which is due soon. lol

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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If your swing is long enough, you don't get paid for all of it.

 

...take some of the Ulmer Park express runs that do express all day and not interlined with local runs. You would do a trip or 2 into the city (into the city, deadhead back to Brooklyn and do it again), park the bus at Quill and swing for about 8 hours. At that point, you have the option of either doing another run (or part of it) for overtime, or just bullshit around. After that, then go back to Quill for 2 trips out the city (to Brooklyn, deadhead back to the city, to Brooklyn again) and pull in from there.

 

That run can be well over 12 hours, but you only get paid for 8 of it

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@VG8 what I stated is true for MaBSTOA and TA surface operators under TWU local 100. As far as what is paid as overtime that all depends on how many hours you pick. For example, if I pick a run that pays 46 hours I would receive 46 hours of pay at straight time. Anything beyond my clear time (pull-in time if I sit on a ramp line) or if I work my day off will be paid at the overtime right of time and one half down to the minute. So if I sit on a ramp line and get a deviation report for as little 20 minutes considering that it is 20 minutes past my clear time I would be paid 30 minutes (since I'm entitled to time and one half). Also, if when calculating overtime pay let's say you end up with a number like 17.5 minutes, the operator will get the benefit of the time so s/he would be paid for 18 minutes. Regarding RDO pay, if I work my day off or double up (this only happens should the road blow up and they need to cover runs for PM rush) you would be paid time and one half on the entire piece of work sans the swing.

 

@Fresh Pond: There is a pay formula used to calculate run pay. The variables in this formula consist of your spread (total hours worked i.e your report time to your clear time), total swing (total meal time), standard (report time to your clear time minus your swing), paid swing (if your swing is 59 minutes or less you are paid for the entire meal time with the minimum time that can be allotted to you being 20 minutes, 60 minutes - 1hr59 minutes will be paid only 60 minutes and anything over 2 hours will be paid half of the swing, for example, a swing that is 2 hours and 22 minutes will be paid 1 hour and 11 minutes. The other two pieces in the pay formula are boost pay and half time boost. If my spread is less than 8 hours the run will be given a boost so that it will pay no less than 8 hours as I explained before. Now, if after subtracting my spread and swing and my standard (spread minus total swing) is over 8 hours any amount of time in excess of 8 hours will be divided in half and paid as a premium. For example, after subtracting the total swing from the spread my standard is 9 hours that means that there is 1 hour in excess of 8 so I would be paid and extra 30 minutes (half of one hour). Let's take a look at the hypothetical run you posted let's say the operators report time is 5am, his clear time is 6pm and his swing is as you posted 8 hours.

 

RPT: 5am

CLR: 6pm

SWG: 8 hours

 

To calculate the spread I will subtract his clear time from his report time in military time:

 

1800 - 0500 = 1300 or 13 hours

 

So his spread is 13 hours.

Next, I'll subtract his swing from the spread to get the standard.

 

13 hours - 8 hours = 5 hours

 

So the standard will be 5 hours.

This is what we have so far:

 

RPT: 0500hrs

CLR: 1800hrs

SWG: 8 hours

 

--

Spread: 13 hours

Swing: 8 hours

--

Standard: 5 hours

Paid swing: ??

Boost: ??

1/2 Bonus: ??

Spread Bonus: ??

--

Total Run Pay: ??

 

Alright so now we have to calculate how much of the swing the operator will get paid for. To get this we look back at what I mentioned:

 

< 59 minutes: Entire swing is paid

60 minutes - 119 minutes: only 60 minutes paid

> 120 minutes: half of the swing

 

Being that the hypothetical swing is 8 hours which is well over 120 minutes (2 hours) the operator will be paid for 4 hours of his swing which now leaves us with:

 

RPT: 0500hrs

CLR: 1800hrs

SWG: 8 hours

 

--

Spread: 13 hours

Swing: 8 hours

--

Standard: 5 hours

Paid swing: 4 hours

Boost: ??

1/2 Bonus: ??

Spread Bonus: ??

--

Total Run Pay: ??

 

I forgot to mention that if an operators spread is greater than 11 hours they are entitled to half of the amount over 11 hours. In this case the operators spread is 13 hours which means that he is in excess of 11 by 2 hours. Which means he is entitled to a 1 hour spread bonus.

 

RPT: 0500hrs

CLR: 1800hrs

SWG: 8 hours

 

--

Spread: 13 hours

Swing: 8 hours

--

Standard: 5 hours

Paid swing: 4 hours

Boost: ??

1/2 Bonus: ??

Spread Bonus: 1 hour

--

Total Run Pay: ??

 

Next we see if the operator is entitled to a boost or 1/2 bonus. If the spread is less than 8 hours we have to boost the run up to 8 hours. In this scenario the operator has a 13 hour spread so he can not receive a boost premium. To see if the operator is entitled to a half bonus we have to look at the standard. If the standard is in excess of 8 hours the operator will be paid half of the amount in excess of 8 hours. In this scenario the operators standard is only 5 hours so he is not entitled to a 1/2 bonus.

 

RPT: 0500hrs

CLR: 1800hrs

SWG: 8 hours

 

--

Spread: 13 hours

Swing: 8 hours

--

Standard: 5 hours

Paid swing: 4 hours

Boost: 0

1/2 Bonus: 0

Spread Bonus: 1 hour

--

Total Run Pay: ??

 

Now that we have all the variables required to calculate total run pay we just add up the standard, paid swing, boost, 1/2 bonus and spread bonus which equals:

 

RPT: 0500hrs

CLR: 1800hrs

SWG: 8 hours

 

--

Spread: 13 hours

Swing: 8 hours

--

Standard: 5 hours

Paid swing: 4 hours

Boost: 0

1/2 Bonus: 0

Spread Bonus: 1 hour

--

Total Run Pay: 10 hours

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@VG8 what I stated is true for MaBSTOA and TA surface operators under TWU local 100. As far as what is paid as overtime that all depends on how many hours you pick. For example, if I pick a run that pays 46 hours I would receive 46 hours of pay at straight time. Anything beyond my clear time (pull-in time if I sit on a ramp line) or if I work my day off will be paid at the overtime right of time and one half down to the minute. So if I sit on a ramp line and get a deviation report for as little 20 minutes considering that it is 20 minutes past my clear time I would be paid 30 minutes (since I'm entitled to time and one half). Also, if when calculating overtime pay let's say you end up with a number like 17.5 minutes, the operator will get the benefit of the time so s/he would be paid for 18 minutes. Regarding RDO pay, if I work my day off or double up (this only happens should the road blow up and they need to cover runs for PM rush) you would be paid time and one half on the entire piece of work sans the swing.

 

@Fresh Pond: There is a pay formula used to calculate run pay. The variables in this formula consist of your spread (total hours worked i.e your report time to your clear time), total swing (total meal time), standard (report time to your clear time minus your swing), paid swing (if your swing is 59 minutes or less you are paid for the entire meal time with the minimum time that can be allotted to you being 20 minutes, 60 minutes - 1hr59 minutes will be paid only 60 minutes and anything over 2 hours will be paid half of the swing, for example, a swing that is 2 hours and 22 minutes will be paid 1 hour and 11 minutes. The other two pieces in the pay formula are boost pay and half time boost. If my spread is less than 8 hours the run will be given a boost so that it will pay no less than 8 hours as I explained before. Now, if after subtracting my spread and swing and my standard (spread minus total swing) is over 8 hours any amount of time in excess of 8 hours will be divided in half and paid as a premium. For example, after subtracting the total swing from the spread my standard is 9 hours that means that there is 1 hour in excess of 8 so I would be paid and extra 30 minutes (half of one hour). Let's take a look at the hypothetical run you posted let's say the operators report time is 5am, his clear time is 6pm and his swing is as you posted 8 hours.

 

RPT: 5am

CLR: 6pm

SWG: 8 hours

 

To calculate the spread I will subtract his clear time from his report time in military time:

 

1800 - 0500 = 1300 or 13 hours

 

So his spread is 13 hours.

Next, I'll subtract his swing from the spread to get the standard.

 

13 hours - 8 hours = 5 hours

 

So the standard will be 5 hours.

This is what we have so far:

 

RPT: 0500hrs

CLR: 1800hrs

SWG: 8 hours

 

--

Spread: 13 hours

Swing: 8 hours

--

Standard: 5 hours

Paid swing: ??

Boost: ??

1/2 Bonus: ??

Spread Bonus: ??

--

Total Run Pay: ??

 

Alright so now we have to calculate how much of the swing the operator will get paid for. To get this we look back at what I mentioned:

 

< 59 minutes: Entire swing is paid

60 minutes - 119 minutes: only 60 minutes paid

> 120 minutes: half of the swing

 

Being that the hypothetical swing is 8 hours which is well over 120 minutes (2 hours) the operator will be paid for 4 hours of his swing which now leaves us with:

 

RPT: 0500hrs

CLR: 1800hrs

SWG: 8 hours

 

--

Spread: 13 hours

Swing: 8 hours

--

Standard: 5 hours

Paid swing: 4 hours

Boost: ??

1/2 Bonus: ??

Spread Bonus: ??

--

Total Run Pay: ??

 

I forgot to mention that if an operators spread is greater than 11 hours they are entitled to half of the amount over 11 hours. In this case the operators spread is 13 hours which means that he is in excess of 11 by 2 hours. Which means he is entitled to a 1 hour spread bonus.

 

RPT: 0500hrs

CLR: 1800hrs

SWG: 8 hours

 

--

Spread: 13 hours

Swing: 8 hours

--

Standard: 5 hours

Paid swing: 4 hours

Boost: ??

1/2 Bonus: ??

Spread Bonus: 1 hour

--

Total Run Pay: ??

 

Next we see if the operator is entitled to a boost or 1/2 bonus. If the spread is less than 8 hours we have to boost the run up to 8 hours. In this scenario the operator has a 13 hour spread so he can not receive a boost premium. To see if the operator is entitled to a half bonus we have to look at the standard. If the standard is in excess of 8 hours the operator will be paid half of the amount in excess of 8 hours. In this scenario the operators standard is only 5 hours so he is not entitled to a 1/2 bonus.

 

RPT: 0500hrs

CLR: 1800hrs

SWG: 8 hours

 

--

Spread: 13 hours

Swing: 8 hours

--

Standard: 5 hours

Paid swing: 4 hours

Boost: 0

1/2 Bonus: 0

Spread Bonus: 1 hour

--

Total Run Pay: ??

 

Now that we have all the variables required to calculate total run pay we just add up the standard, paid swing, boost, 1/2 bonus and spread bonus which equals:

 

RPT: 0500hrs

CLR: 1800hrs

SWG: 8 hours

 

--

Spread: 13 hours

Swing: 8 hours

--

Standard: 5 hours

Paid swing: 4 hours

Boost: 0

1/2 Bonus: 0

Spread Bonus: 1 hour

--

Total Run Pay: 10 hours

very imformative, thank you!

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@VG8 what I stated is true for MaBSTOA and TA surface operators under TWU local 100. As far as what is paid as overtime that all depends on how many hours you pick. For example, if I pick a run that pays 46 hours I would receive 46 hours of pay at straight time. Anything beyond my clear time (pull-in time if I sit on a ramp line) or if I work my day off will be paid at the overtime right of time and one half down to the minute. So if I sit on a ramp line and get a deviation report for as little 20 minutes considering that it is 20 minutes past my clear time I would be paid 30 minutes (since I'm entitled to time and one half). Also, if when calculating overtime pay let's say you end up with a number like 17.5 minutes, the operator will get the benefit of the time so s/he would be paid for 18 minutes. Regarding RDO pay, if I work my day off or double up (this only happens should the road blow up and they need to cover runs for PM rush) you would be paid time and one half on the entire piece of work sans the swing.

It makes perfect sense now.  Now I see why the senior guys get the "good picks" and all of that.  So in essence you may work X amount of hours but only be paid for Y amount of hours.... Makes a lot of sense.  Now I see why some (MTA) Bus guys make the switch unless they've got a decent amount of seniority.  :lol:

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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Yup! Vehicle time (the time actually spent driving the bus) is also another factor when picking a run. Two runs can pay 9 hours but one of them will have 8 hours of vehicle time while the other has 6.5 hours. Its on the operator to know what are the good pieces of work and what are the "slave" runs lol.

 

--

 

Any one want to take a stab at paying this run with the formula I explained above? (This was my run last pick)

 

Run: 41

Route: Bx 9

 

Report: 1401hrs

Clear: 2231hrs

 

Swing:

Off Run 36: 1659hrs

On Run 44: 1755

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Yup! Vehicle time (the time actually spent driving the bus) is also another factor when picking a run. Two runs can pay 9 hours but one of them will have 8 hours of vehicle time while the other has 6.5 hours. Its on the operator to know what are the good pieces of work and what are the "slave" runs lol.

 

--

 

Any one want to take a stab at paying this run with the formula I explained above? (This was my run last pick)

 

Run: 41

Route: Bx 9

 

Report: 1401hrs

Clear: 2231hrs

 

Swing:

Off Run 36: 1659hrs

On Run 44: 1755

Speaking of runs I finally used the Bx10 the other night. I missed the last express bus (guy came early) <_< so rather than schlep all the way over to Grand Central, I took the M7 to 96th since one was coming and got the (1) train and took that all the way to 231st street to see if I could get a bus because there was no way I walking up all of those crazy hills. I didn't realize that the Bx7 stops running after a certain time, so my only option was the Bx10.  I was astonished at what little run time that bus has. From the first stop in the Bronx over by Montefiore, it was about 14 minutes to get to 231st street and Broadway. Once he picked us up we flew up the hills. The Bx10 seems like a real slave run. 

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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Speaking of runs I finally used the Bx10 the other night. I missed the last express bus (guy came early) <_< so rather than schlep all the way over to Grand Central, I took the M7 to 96th since one was coming and got the (1) train and took that all the way to 231st street to see if I could get a bus because there was no way I walking up all of those crazy hills. I didn't realize that the Bx7 stops running after a certain time, so my only option was the Bx10.  I was astonished at what little run time that bus has. From the first stop in the Bronx over by Montefiore, it was about 14 minutes to get to 231st street and Broadway. Once he picked us up we flew up the hills. The Bx10 seems like a real slave run. 

 

Yes, that was most likely Run 1 on the Bx10.  For some reason transit only allots 27 minutes of running time from 263rd street and Riverdale Avenue - 206 Street and Bainbridge Avenue and 3 minutes of layover time.  It is impossible!  Of course, this was done as a measure to save money as they use another formula to calculate how many buses will be needed to maintain a headway.  The headway on the hawk run is 40 minutes.  So to calculate the number of buses required to maintain that head way you add the running time times 2 plus the lay over time times 2 and divide that by the head way, so:

 

27(2) + 3(2)

---------------

       40

 

which equals 1.5.  According to the equation 2 buses would be required (5 and up, you have to round up)to maintain a 40 minute headway, in reality, there is only 1 bus out there and you can't make the time prescribed by the schedule as there is moderate usage of the hawk run.  Plus, you have to slow down to turn and stop at red lights.  I believe 37 minutes would suffice as one would be able to operate the bus in accordance to NYC speed limits and make turns at a safe speed all while maintaining the schedule (Operators should be doing this regardless of what the schedule says but we've got some special ones over here lol).  An adjustment of run time would then mean that they would have to have 2 hawk runs on the Bx 10 which would make the most sense being that both the Bx 9 and 41 have two as well.

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Yes, that was most likely Run 1 on the Bx10.  For some reason transit only allots 27 minutes of running time from 263rd street and Riverdale Avenue - 206 Street and Bainbridge Avenue and 3 minutes of layover time.  It is impossible!  Of course, this was done as a measure to save money as they use another formula to calculate how many buses will be needed to maintain a headway.  The headway on the hawk run is 40 minutes.  So to calculate the number of buses required to maintain that head way you add the running time times 2 plus the lay over time times 2 and divide that by the head way, so:

 

27(2) + 3(2)

---------------

       40

 

which equals 1.5.  According to the equation 2 buses would be required (5 and up, you have to round up)to maintain a 40 minute headway, in reality, there is only 1 bus out there and you can't make the time prescribed by the schedule as there is moderate usage of the hawk run.  Plus, you have to slow down to turn and stop at red lights.  I believe 37 minutes would suffice as one would be able to operate the bus in accordance to NYC speed limits and make turns at a safe speed all while maintaining the schedule (Operators should be doing this regardless of what the schedule says but we've got some special ones over here lol).  An adjustment of run time would then mean that they would have to have 2 hawk runs on the Bx 10 which would make the most sense being that both the Bx 9 and 41 have two as well.

lol... I was actually wondering if there were any buses even running to Riverdale.  People kept looking at the schedule and some people called a cab because they didn't think there were any buses.   :lol: I'm like my God, no Bx7 or Bx10?!? It was a long wait too but I saw one going to the Bronx, so I said well maybe one will be going towards Riverdale so I waited and lucked out.  I don't think he was on BusTime though for some odd reason.  Is it really possible to not come up on BusTime just by not entering the right info?  That's insane.  That shouldn't have anything to do with tracking the bus, but apparently it does.  My B/O friend accidentally put up the BxM3 sign and I couldn't track him on the BxM2 and only realized it when he pulled into my stop. lol

 

On those hawk runs they must really depend on not getting many people because the way we flew up that hill was something. I didn't even know a local bus could move that fast. lol

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On those hawk runs they must really depend on not getting many people because the way we flew up that hill was something. I didn't even know a local bus could move that fast. lol

Those Orion Vii Hybrids don't F' around. Tap the pedal and they're flying, LMAO!

 

 

Also, many thanks to Youngblaze for providing some elaboration on the subject.

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I've heard that if you don't enter your pass number, run and route correctly in the IFU (Integrated Farebox Unit, the fancy name for the farebox) that you will disappear on the system.  I don't know how much truth there is to it.  I do know that if you make a relief and don't log in you will show up as running hot to bus track by how long your relief's swing is.  There are still many bugs being worked out in the system as I have been told by people who worked in the Bus Time division.



Those Orion Vii Hybrids don't F' around. Tap the pedal and they're flying, LMAO!



Also, many thanks to Youngblaze for providing some elaboration on the subject.

Not a problem, the NG's fly up till 40 where they are governed at.  Unfortunately, they have scheduled some runs to operate that fast, meanwhile, the legal speed limit in NYC is 30 mph unless otherwise posted.  It's on the operator to follow Zerega's philosophy:

 

Safety,

Service.

Schedule

 

Safety being the number one priority, providing service second and lastly maintaining the schedule.

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I've heard that if you don't enter your pass number, run and route correctly in the IFU (Integrated Farebox Unit, the fancy name for the farebox) that you will disappear on the system.  I don't know how much truth there is to it.  I do know that if you make a relief and don't log in you will show up as running hot to bus track by how long your relief's swing is.  There are still many bugs being worked out in the system as I have been told by people who worked in the Bus Time division.

You're telling me... There's a guy on the BxM2 who is NEVER on BusTime and I said it's impossible that he gets a bus that is always bugged, so something is up...  <_<

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Not a problem, the NG's fly up till 40 where they are governed at.  Unfortunately, they have scheduled some runs to operate that fast, meanwhile, the legal speed limit in NYC is 30 mph unless otherwise posted.  It's on the operator to follow Zerega's philosophy:

 

Safety,

Service.

Schedule

 

Safety being the number one priority, providing service second and lastly maintaining the schedule.

Yeah, if anything the MTA tuned down the Vii's (both the OG's and NG's) after learning from the first OG's. On a side note, amongst the Hybrid fleet I'll argue that the OG's have more pickup. Having ridden some unaltered OG's in San Fran I can tell you those thing will have you grasping the sanctions to avoid plastering yourself on the ground.

 

Speaking of Safety, Service, Schedule it seems as if that philosophy is only followed when there are repercussions to not following them. Otherwise it's almost like a free for all in the case of many.

 

 

You're telling me... There's a guy on the BxM2 who is NEVER on BusTime and I said it's impossible that he gets a bus that is always bugged, so something is up...  <_<

Maybe it's an afterthought as it's still a new concept for many operators. It's annoying for sure, but I'd try to cut the guy a break if he wasn't a douchebag or anything.

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I went to the transit festival yesterday with a page from LGA's Sunday fall pick. I was able to figure out most of the columns and needed assistance from some operators to figure out the rest. The pick sheet has a column

HLF

BST

which previous messages explained means half pay if the spread is greater than 8 hours or boost if the spread is less than 8 hours. Nite differential is time worked between 6 PM and 6 AM. Swing is based on time sitting in the terminal of a split shift. Run 805 on Q18 Pulls out at 5:59 AM, pulls in at 9:57 AM, goes out at 2:48 PM and pulls in at 7:16 PM. 9:57 AM to 2:48 PM is 4 hours 51 minutes and the swing is 2 hours 21 minutes, which is about half of the 4:51.

 

There is a column RT which I was told means Recovery Time, which has a different definition from Layover Time at a terminal point. Every run of every route has 15 in the RT column so can somebody explain RT?

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