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Culver Lcl

Lots of R46 F trains in Rotation

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All of corona's R62A SMS work was done in 207th St overhaul shop recently, but for years the corona cars did get heavy work done at CI

 

Thanks.

 

That tidbit about the overhaul shop is interesting, though - where do the A division cars get sent for overhauls (minor the Corona ones)? 207?

 

Correct.

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The R46's have 32 doors per train on each side. The R160's have 40 doors per train on each side. Since ridership on the E is very heavy, 40-door trains are typically assigned to the line, to keep dwell times down. Since the early 90's, the E ran almost exclusively R32's, then R42's for a short period during the R160's phase-in, and now R160's. Don't expect to see R46's on a regular basis. (Of course, in a pinch, R46's can run on the line.)

 

Contrary to popular belief, NYCT doesn't assign cars based on who they expect to complain. (The overwhelming majority of riders don't care one way or the other, as long as the car is air conditioned and reliably gets them where they're going.)

Right & I don't mean the (E) should be all R46s. Just a few during the day and late nights make it  half or mostly R46s to let the 160s rest up

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I 99% of the time have seen r46, but I miss the r160? Why did they take it off the line?

There are R160's on the (F) . It depends on the time you ride the (F) which may think there are much more R46's on the (F) . The reson why there is more R46's on the (F) is due to the Montague tube closure. The Southern portion of the (R) can't have R46's at this time. Coney Island can only maintain the R160's which is the nearest yard to the Southern portion of the (R). There is a good amount of R160''s in the northern portion of the (R) along with the R46's. The R46's that are displaced by the R160's well most of the R46's run on the (F). The (F) is a long line that runs over 40 trains in the rush. It's like about half R46's  and half R160's  on that line. Don't assume that there are rarely R160's on the (F) it depends on what time you ride the (F) like I said before. 

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I see both R46s and R160s on the (F). Sometimes a few R160s in row; sometimes a few R46s and sometimes R46 then R160s.

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There are three distinct facilities with similar names.

 

Coney Island Yard is a storage facility, not a maintenance facility of any sort. It stores trains. That's it.

 

Coney Island Maintenance Shop is responsible for everyday maintenance and scheduled inspections of the R160's, R68's, and R68A's assigned to the B, G, N, Q, and Franklin shuttle. It also, apparently, helps out on the R during the week. There haven't been any R46's assigned to Coney Island in decades.

 

Coney Island Overhaul Shop is responsible for major overhaul work - SMS and the like - on all B Division cars. (I think the Corona fleet also has its SMS work at Coney Island Overhaul Shop - can anyone confirm?)

 

Yeah I need to stop generalizing, thanks for the wake up call. Ok so since this is important, allow me to post what I know in more detail, feel free to add to this or make corrections, I might have factual typos in this.

 

The overhaul & repair complex itself consists of three separate buildings as you've mentioned, which houses several shops:

 

1) The main overhaul shop (as you mentioned),

 

2) The electric motor repair shopwhere maintenance is performed on HVAC units, pneumatic air compressors and so forth.

 

3) Paint shop, speaks for itself

 

4) The pneumatic shop where air brake units are repaired. (Now I'm wondering which shop handles the dynamic brakes on the NTT's?)

 

5) The Wheel, truck and axle shop, which handles repairs of axles, wheels, and trucks for the subway and SIRT fleets. Some of the massive  equipment housed in the shop is the wheel boring machine, which reconditions the centers of wheels on the axles, some others are the wheel truing machine,which reprofiles subway wheels after excessive or unusual wear.

 

6) The Maintenance/inspection shop (as you mentioned) where daily inspections are made

 

7)The Traction motor shop,  another dead ringer, repair and overhaul of propulsion motors,

 

8) The The shoe beam shop, for maintainance of third-rail shoe beams.

 

9) The The battery shop, again speaks for itself. 

 

10) Finally the support shop were the machine, sheet metal, and blacksmith facilities are, also handles all maintenance of equipment within all the CI complex.

 

11) To add there are also materiel storage rooms, a medical center, a police firing range, and training facilities. What's interesting as well is that some  of the shops is certified by the Association of American Railroads meaning that technically they have equipment that can handle repairs of any rapid transit and railroad cars in the entire country. Now that's something.

 

The only other facility I believe that is capable of handling SMS work  is the 207th Street shops, currently. The Lenox St yard used to have a overhaul shop for the IRT but it was demolished. Currently the main overhaul/repair shop for the A division is located at the 180th Street complex and Corona yard has a shop for repairs and light overhauls.

 

 

 

(I think the Corona fleet also has its SMS work at Coney Island Overhaul Shop - can anyone confirm?)

 

As for the overhauls of the R62As: It's should the Coney Island Overhaul Shops because they always did the major work on all (7) cars. I've seen train crews reverse rail @ Pacific Street on the BMT 4th Ave many times on the way to the Manny B to Astoria back to Corona Yard from Coney Island, so that's an indication. The 207th Street shop is capable of SMS work but there currently booked you can say. Plus T/Os at subchat confirmed it as well. Plus pics taken suggests it.

 

Pics of work at CI shops (Second one taken by NYCTF Administrator Brighton Local)

 

img_110074.jpg

Source: nycsubway.org (Rob Mencher) 

 

img_110005.jpgSource: nycsubway.org (Zach Summer) 

Edited by realizm
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Remember that at the very end of the (V) they also had R32's......

July 1st 2009 most of the R40/42 fleet with the remaining R32s went to the R/V lines while most of the newer equipment was on the E/F

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Yeah I need to stop generalizing, thanks for the wake up call. Ok so since this is important, allow me to post what I know in more detail, feel free to add to this or make corrections, I might have factual typos in this.

 

The overhaul & repair complex itself consists of three separate buildings as you've mentioned, which houses several shops:

 

1) The main overhaul shop (as you mentioned),

 

2) The electric motor repair shop, where maintenance is performed on HVAC units, pneumatic air compressors and so forth.

 

3) Paint shop, speaks for itself

 

4) The pneumatic shop where air brake units are repaired. (Now I'm wondering which shop handles the dynamic brakes on the NTT's?)

 

5) The Wheel, truck and axle shop, which handles repairs of axles, wheels, and trucks for the subway and SIRT fleets. Some of the massive equipment housed in the shop is the wheel boring machine, which reconditions the centers of wheels on the axles, some others are the wheel truing machine,which reprofiles subway wheels after excessive or unusual wear.

 

6) The Maintenance/inspection shop (as you mentioned) where daily inspections are made

 

7)The Traction motor shop, another dead ringer, repair and overhaul of propulsion motors,

 

8) The The shoe beam shop, for maintainance of third-rail shoe beams.

 

9) The The battery shop, again speaks for itself.

 

10) Finally the support shop were the machine, sheet metal, and blacksmith facilities are, also handles all maintenance of equipment within all the CI complex.

 

11) To add there are also materiel storage rooms, a medical center, a police firing range, and training facilities. What's interesting as well is that some of the shops is certified by the Association of American Railroads meaning that technically they have equipment that can handle repairs of any rapid transit and railroad cars in the entire country. Now that's something.

 

The only other facility I believe that is capable of handling SMS work is the 207th Street shops, currently. The Lenox St yard used to have a overhaul shop for the IRT but it was demolished. Currently the main overhaul/repair shop for the A division is located at the 180th Street complex and Corona yard has a shop for repairs and light overhauls.

 

 

As for the overhauls of the R62As: It's should the Coney Island Overhaul Shops because they always did the major work on all (7) cars. I've seen train crews reverse rail @ Pacific Street on the BMT 4th Ave many times on the way to the Manny B to Astoria back to Corona Yard from Coney Island, so that's an indication. The 207th Street shop is capable of SMS work but there currently booked you can say. Plus T/Os at subchat confirmed it as well. Plus pics taken suggests it.

 

Pics of work at CI shops (Second one taken by NYCTF Administrator Brighton Local)

 

img_110074.jpg

Source: nycsubway.org (Rob Mencher)

 

img_110005.jpgSource: nycsubway.org (Zach Summer)

The 1 R62A SMS were done at CI, the Corona R62A SMS was done at 207th, but the ta plans to make 207th a A division shop, I was surprised that the 1 cars were done at CI instead of 207th, but most A division work will be done at 207th shops, as for the R188s they might get heavy work done at CI, but the mainline cars are done at 207th

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Yeah I need to stop generalizing, thanks for the wake up call. Ok so since this is important, allow me to post what I know in more detail, feel free to add to this or make corrections, I might have factual typos in this.

 

The overhaul & repair complex itself consists of three separate buildings as you've mentioned, which houses several shops:

 

1) The main overhaul shop (as you mentioned),

 

2) The electric motor repair shop, where maintenance is performed on HVAC units, pneumatic air compressors and so forth.

 

3) Paint shop, speaks for itself

 

4) The pneumatic shop where air brake units are repaired. (Now I'm wondering which shop handles the dynamic brakes on the NTT's?)

 

5) The Wheel, truck and axle shop, which handles repairs of axles, wheels, and trucks for the subway and SIRT fleets. Some of the massive equipment housed in the shop is the wheel boring machine, which reconditions the centers of wheels on the axles, some others are the wheel truing machine,which reprofiles subway wheels after excessive or unusual wear.

 

6) The Maintenance/inspection shop (as you mentioned) where daily inspections are made

 

7)The Traction motor shop, another dead ringer, repair and overhaul of propulsion motors,

 

8) The The shoe beam shop, for maintainance of third-rail shoe beams.

 

9) The The battery shop, again speaks for itself.

 

10) Finally the support shop were the machine, sheet metal, and blacksmith facilities are, also handles all maintenance of equipment within all the CI complex.

 

11) To add there are also materiel storage rooms, a medical center, a police firing range, and training facilities. What's interesting as well is that some of the shops is certified by the Association of American Railroads meaning that technically they have equipment that can handle repairs of any rapid transit and railroad cars in the entire country. Now that's something.

 

The only other facility I believe that is capable of handling SMS work is the 207th Street shops, currently. The Lenox St yard used to have a overhaul shop for the IRT but it was demolished. Currently the main overhaul/repair shop for the A division is located at the 180th Street complex and Corona yard has a shop for repairs and light overhauls.

 

 

As for the overhauls of the R62As: It's should the Coney Island Overhaul Shops because they always did the major work on all (7) cars. I've seen train crews reverse rail @ Pacific Street on the BMT 4th Ave many times on the way to the Manny B to Astoria back to Corona Yard from Coney Island, so that's an indication. The 207th Street shop is capable of SMS work but there currently booked you can say. Plus T/Os at subchat confirmed it as well. Plus pics taken suggests it.

 

Pics of work at CI shops (Second one taken by NYCTF Administrator Brighton Local)

 

img_110074.jpg

Source: nycsubway.org (Rob Mencher)

 

img_110005.jpgSource: nycsubway.org (Zach Summer)

Any yard is capable for light maintenance for their respective fleet (save for Unionport, a satellite to 180, Lenox, a satellite for Livonia, Canarsie & Fresh Pond, a satellite for ENY). Whatever can't be done gets sent to Coney Island or 207.

Edited by Fresh Pond

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Yes I realize that pretty much all yards are equipped with shops for light maintenance or daily inspections. I was referring to major repair work, general overhauls (GOH) , or SMS (Scheduled maintenance service) -- only 207th and CI Yard can do that heavy work as only those two facilities has the major equipment.

 

Unless we are considering SMS,  in itself light maintenance, if that's the case the I will have to stand corrected.

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speaking of R46 on the (F) and R160, you can always see a 160 on the (F) on weekends since its not that much as the rush hours. 

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Yes I realize that pretty much all yards are equipped with shops for light maintenance or daily inspections. I was referring to major repair work, general overhauls (GOH) , or SMS (Scheduled maintenance service) -- only 207th and CI Yard can do that heavy work as only those two facilities has the major equipment.

 

Unless we are considering SMS,  in itself light maintenance, if that's the case the I will have to stand corrected.

 

Correction on abbreviation: SMS or Scheduled Maintenance System. 

 

(off beat today admittably)

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Yeah I need to stop generalizing, thanks for the wake up call. Ok so since this is important, allow me to post what I know in more detail, feel free to add to this or make corrections, I might have factual typos in this.

 

The overhaul & repair complex itself consists of three separate buildings as you've mentioned, which houses several shops:

 

1) The main overhaul shop (as you mentioned),

 

2) The electric motor repair shopwhere maintenance is performed on HVAC units, pneumatic air compressors and so forth.

 

3) Paint shop, speaks for itself

 

4) The pneumatic shop where air brake units are repaired. (Now I'm wondering which shop handles the dynamic brakes on the NTT's?)

 

5) The Wheel, truck and axle shop, which handles repairs of axles, wheels, and trucks for the subway and SIRT fleets. Some of the massive  equipment housed in the shop is the wheel boring machine, which reconditions the centers of wheels on the axles, some others are the wheel truing machine,which reprofiles subway wheels after excessive or unusual wear.

 

6) The Maintenance/inspection shop (as you mentioned) where daily inspections are made

 

7)The Traction motor shop,  another dead ringer, repair and overhaul of propulsion motors,

 

8) The The shoe beam shop, for maintainance of third-rail shoe beams.

 

9) The The battery shop, again speaks for itself. 

 

10) Finally the support shop were the machine, sheet metal, and blacksmith facilities are, also handles all maintenance of equipment within all the CI complex.

 

11) To add there are also materiel storage rooms, a medical center, a police firing range, and training facilities. What's interesting as well is that some  of the shops is certified by the Association of American Railroads meaning that technically they have equipment that can handle repairs of any rapid transit and railroad cars in the entire country. Now that's something. 

 

 

Thanks for the details! I'm not familiar with shops in that level of detail, so don't count on me to make corrections or additions.

 

Any yard is capable for light maintenance for their respective fleet (save for Unionport, a satellite to 180, Lenox, a satellite for Livonia, Canarsie & Fresh Pond, a satellite for ENY). Whatever can't be done gets sent to Coney Island or 207.

 

Yards are not capable of doing maintenance. Shops are.

 

Unionport, Lenox, Canarsie, and Fresh Pond are examples of yards that don't contain shops. They're not satellites; they're just plain yards.

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Actually they have been a few more R160s added to the Fox and they sent a few more R46s to the Romeo.

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I know this is an old thread, but does anyone know why there are still tons of R46 trains on the F even though the Montague repairs have been finished?

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Necroposting, much?

 

The (F) and (R) always share fleets since they are both based out of Jamaica. Whatever that's available is what operates on the day(s) in question depending on the rider's perspective. The (E) is strictly 160s due to the 60 feets having more doors than the 75 feets, and also, because of its ridership. Question answered.

Edited by RollOver

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I know this is an old thread, but does anyone know why there are still tons of R46 trains on the F even though the Montague repairs have been finished?

I also seen a 160 on the  (R) today....

 

I wonder the same thing, as the  (R)  was usually 100 percent R46 since the fall of 2012, with the 46's sprinkled on the  (F) .

 

 

Not complaining though, I love the mixed fleets  :D

Edited by trainfan22

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I haven't been on the (F) like that enough to keep up with this, but what T to Dyre said... last year... I also picked up on (and it still remained true until somewhat recently here in 2014, from what I noticed), having boarded (F)'s at Roosevelt av. en route to 21st.... That is, until earlier in the week, when I had to do the same commute, and ended up doing a double-take when I saw an R46 on the (F) again..... There was a string of weeks when I'd embark on nothing but R160's......

 

Personally, I like the R46's more.... But I won't disclose any reasons because quite frankly, I'm not in it to mix it up with anyone on some fanboy pissing contest shit..... So my question(s) is a simple one...

 

When did they resort to running R46's on the F again (from the fall season of this year, on)?

Or were they always running on the (F) during that timeframe and it just so happened that I've been running into (meaning riding/catching) the R160's during, pretty much, since September?

 

Thanks.

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