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pjbr40

SEPTA

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I was back on the old train at 11 am on Wednesday March 26. Anyway i got few questions.

1-- Does the operator have to keep an eye out on the catenary wire as well the other destruction in track?

2-- Does the pentograph moves up and down automatic as the height from the catenary wires decrease and increase near tunnel?

3-- Does the Septa ever had middle doors on their old coaches? i figure by now all trains have middle doors for ada and high level platform.

4-- I couldn't recall in direction for the Philly to ACY Do they travel south and turn left or travel north and turn right? The reason  why i ask this i never saw a NjTransit train going north out of philly. I am thinking it possible for swap cars or heading to maintenance. 

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1. It would be a good idea (possibility of downed wires)

 

2. Yes

 

3. Not on old coaches. In fact SEPTA's only centered door cars are the Comet IIIs

 

4. NJ Transit trains run North to Atlantic City, bypassing North Philadelphia and diverging at Frankford Junction for the run to AC

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A downed wire puts and tremendous amount of current into the ground and lights up the neighborhood at night.  So running the train into it  is very dangerous to say the least.  Even a hanging wire can be seen for quite a distance as the overhead wires if dropped can be seen.

 

The pantograph has a spring in it to give upward pressure similar to a spring in a garage door and automatically adjusts to the height of the overhead wires.whatever they are.

 

A good deal of Septa stations are  not  wheelchair capable as Septa goes to Delaware  and up to Trenton.  Very few of the cars are center doored because of that. It depends on the route.

 

The only stop of NJ Transit in Pa is 30th Street Philly with the old Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore lines going to AC.  The train goes North out of Philly and switches to Delair bridge over the Delaware river into the Pavonia yards in New Jersey and onto the old tracks going to Cherry Hill and Lindenwald and then to AC with a number of stops.  The tracks to Lindenwald are shared with PATCO which is the Delaware Port Authority  trains similar to our PATH here except outdoor stations   They have service facilities for maintenance in Pennsauken where engines and carwork done.  They also have a fueling facility at AC as they use diesels as the power for the line. 

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I was familiar with that line because I saw my first steam loco on that line about 1952.  They had Camelback loco's which were to me at the time the craziest things going like nothing I saw.  Being raised by the Sunnyside yards I thought all red passenger cars said Pennsylvania  or Pullman on them but to see that name was unbelievable    In the early 70's PATCO started to rebuild on the tracks and running the commuter trains to  Lindenwald.  Lindenwald was the end because Camden county was moving everything out of Camden City as it was going south and the area had open land where they could build a large modern complex. The State and Amtrac rebuilt the original lines on the basis of the Casinos building going on for tourists.out of Philly.  Amtrac pulled out ridership didn't justify but NJ Transit continued because the stations were at one time small towns which the Casino workers moved to. which justified the train as a commuter run.

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does anyone know what brand bus does SEPTA use? i like the way they purr.

 

 

Mostly New Flyer with a few NABI's, Neoplan's and El Dorado's

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That NJ Transit 'facility' is actually in Camden and its for the River Line trains.... Atlantic City line trains and locomotives are serviced at the AC rail terminal

 

Additional servicing on the rail cars and locomotives, trains would deadhead up the NEC to MMC... I have seen deadhead trains that had 3 locomotives go up the ACRL before turning at Frankford Junction

 

When I first opened this thread, I originally thought this was about the SEPTA transit union strike which may happen tonight at midnight... What would only run tomorrow is Reginal Rail, LUCY bus, and Paratransit if the strike happens

Edited by mfs NJT459

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Well its official, SEPTA Rail ops are on strike

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does anyone know what brand bus does SEPTA use? i like the way they purr.

Your question has multiple answers.. Sorry for bumping an old thread but I think many members would like to know the answer. Not just you, so I figured... why not educate everyone...

 

The oldest buses in the fleet is the 1997 NABI 416.08TA buses, numbered in the lower 5000 series (5001-5400 specifically). These buses are powered by a Detroit Diesel Series 50 275HP engine and an Allison B400R 4-speed transmission. These buses run surprisingly well for their age, but since the 40 foot LFSs are coming in quick, SEPTA has already retired 3 of the remaining 91 buses from service

normal_2012-03-14_003_281280x96129.jpg

 

Second oldest, yet the raggedy-iest buses in the fleet, is the 1998-2000 Neoplan AN460A Articulated buses (numbered 7101-7255), Powered by a Detroit Diesel series 50 320HP engine, and an Allison B500R 5-speed transmission. So far, SEPTA has only retired 1 Neoplan (7195) from revenue service...

2011-09-10_069.JPG

 

Third oldest, technically, are the 2000-2001 Eldorado Transmark RE-29 buses (4501-4581). All the Eldorados are powered by the Cummins ISB 6.7L engine and an Allison B300R 5-speed transmission. Previously these buses ran all over the city and the suburbs on low ridership lines. Now these buses run exclusively on routes 310 (Horsham Breeze) and 316 (LUCY)

DSCF0100.jpg

 

Okay now this is where things get confusing. The bulk of SEPTA's fleet consists of New Flyer D40LF buses. 

The 2000-2002 coaches (numbered 5401-5600) are powered by a Detroit Diesel Series 50 engine and an Allison B400R 5-speed transmission

The 2003 D40LF's (5613-5712) are powered by a Cummins ISL 280HP engine and an Allison B400R 5-speed transmission

The 2004-2005 D40LF's (5713-5830, 5851-5950, and 8000-8119) are powered by Cummins ISL 280HP engines and ZF Ecomat 592-6HP transmissions

Follow that so far? 

normal_IMG_20140411_150231_377_281280x96

 

There is also a small fleet of electric New Flyer buses numbered 800-837. These run exclusively on the 59, 66, and 75 lines

normal_2014-05-21_019_281280x96129.jpg

Okay now it won't be as-confusing.... The hybrid fleet consist of 4 different models: The New Flyer DE40LF, The New Flyer DE40LFR, and two different sizes of the NovaBus LFS (40foot and articulated)

 

 

First the Flyers... Both the DE40LFRs and the DE40LF have the Cummins ISL 280HP engines and the Allison H 40 EP HybriDrive system.

The older 2002-2004 DE40LFs with the original battery pack are numbered 5601H-5612H and 5831H-5850H. These are the ONLY buses in SEPTA's fleet that have a rear-mounted HVAC system.

normal_2011-10-16_002_281280x96029.jpg

 

The newer DE40LF with the smaller battery pack and rooftop HVAC system is numbered 8120-8339. Local transit fans affectionately refer to these as "second gens" pointing out that it is a new generation of DE40LF with a different appearance.

normal_2014-04-18_001_281280x96029.jpg

 

 

The Newest Flyers, the DE40LFRs, are numbered 8340-8559. These buses are simply referred to as restyles, as they are the only "Restyles" in the fleet (since the 800 series buses are trackless trolleys, no one anywhere calls them restyles)

normal_2011-12-23_007_281280x95829.jpg

 

 

 

And we have our newest buses, the NovaBus LFS HEV (both 40 foot and articulated models) The LFS 40 footers are supposed to arrive by the end of this year. The LFS Articulated HEV's are powered by a Cummins ISL 330HP engine and an Allison H 50 EP HybriDrive system. However like the previous 40 foot hybrids, the LFS 40 footers are powered by a Cummins ISL 280HP engine and an Allsion H 40 EP HybriDrive system. 

normal_2014-09-06_031_281280x96229.jpg

 

Since the Champion/Chevorlet cutaways aren't really seen regularly, I didn't include them in this listing. Once again, sorry for bumping this thread. I just figured some people would actually want to know a thing or two about the fleet...

 

 

**Note: All pictures taken by me

Edited by D.J.
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Wow look at that breakdown on the SEPTA bus fleet! Good stuff!

Thanks. Not a lot of people know (or understand) SEPTA's bus fleet, so I figured why not post it. This way in the future, anyone can find it. 

 

 

I hope SEPTA Market-Frankford Line and Broad Street Line goes 24/7 eventually, join PATCO.

Same here. But at least they're trying... and also at least they have bus service along those lines so no one is stranded even if they don't.

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If the ridership doesnt support it I suppose they dont have a choice. But it seems to be doing well.

 

Any chance the trolley goes round the clock? Some?

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Are those subway trolleys? So some sectors of Market Frankford line runs 24/7

Well I will run down the trolley system below. As for the Market Frankford, the line itself runs overnight but between 12:30am and 5:30am the line is operated by bus instead of train. The pilot program in place now is to allow the party-goers that go out on weekends to have a safe commute home - as apparently it's safer to sit in a train car by yourself isolated from society where anyone can attack you and get away with it than it is to be able to call the operator and have him help you within seconds... but that's none of my business...

 

Anyway...

 

The 10, 11, 13, 34, and 36 are the subway-surface trolley lines, run with popular single-ended Kawasaki LRVs

GEDC0028.JPG

 

 

The route 15 is the only true streetcar line, running 100% on the Street. This line is operated with rebuilt PCC cars with the occasional bus thrown in.

IMG_1181.JPG

 

The route 101/102 are suburban light rail lines watered down to trolley standards (because locals refused to accept anything that wasn't a trolley). These lines operate double ended Kawasaki LRVs with pantographs instead of trolley poles and suburban style seating.

normal_2011-12-23_006_281280x96029.jpg

Edited by D.J.
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Your question has multiple answers.. Sorry for bumping an old thread but I think many members would like to know the answer. Not just you, so I figured... why not educate everyone...

 

The oldest buses in the fleet is the 1997 NABI 416.08TA buses, numbered in the lower 5000 series (5001-5400 specifically). These buses are powered by a Detroit Diesel Series 50 275HP engine and an Allison B400R 4-speed transmission. These buses run surprisingly well for their age, but since the 40 foot LFSs are coming in quick, SEPTA has already retired 3 of the remaining 91 buses from service

normal_2012-03-14_003_281280x96129.jpg

 

Second oldest, yet the raggedy-iest buses in the fleet, is the 1998-2000 Neoplan AN460A Articulated buses (numbered 7101-7255), Powered by a Detroit Diesel series 50 320HP engine, and an Allison B500R 5-speed transmission. So far, SEPTA has only retired 1 Neoplan (7195) from revenue service...

2011-09-10_069.JPG

 

Third oldest, technically, are the 2000-2001 Eldorado Transmark RE-29 buses (4501-4581). All the Eldorados are powered by the Cummins ISB 6.7L engine and an Allison B300R 5-speed transmission. Previously these buses ran all over the city and the suburbs on low ridership lines. Now these buses run exclusively on routes 310 (Horsham Breeze) and 316 (LUCY)

DSCF0100.jpg

 

Okay now this is where things get confusing. The bulk of SEPTA's fleet consists of New Flyer D40LF buses. 

The 2000-2002 coaches (numbered 5401-5600) are powered by a Detroit Diesel Series 50 engine and an Allison B400R 5-speed transmission

The 2003 D40LF's (5613-5712) are powered by a Cummins ISL 280HP engine and an Allison B400R 5-speed transmission

The 2004-2005 D40LF's (5713-5830, 5851-5950, and 8000-8119) are powered by Cummins ISL 280HP engines and ZF Ecomat 592-6HP transmissions

Follow that so far? 

normal_IMG_20140411_150231_377_281280x96

 

There is also a small fleet of electric New Flyer buses numbered 800-837. These run exclusively on the 59, 66, and 75 lines

normal_2014-05-21_019_281280x96129.jpg

Okay now it won't be as-confusing.... The hybrid fleet consist of 4 different models: The New Flyer DE40LF, The New Flyer DE40LFR, and two different sizes of the NovaBus LFS (40foot and articulated)

 

 

First the Flyers... Both the DE40LFRs and the DE40LF have the Cummins ISL 280HP engines and the Allison H 40 EP HybriDrive system.

The older 2002-2004 DE40LFs with the original battery pack are numbered 5601H-5612H and 5831H-5850H. These are the ONLY buses in SEPTA's fleet that have a rear-mounted HVAC system.

normal_2011-10-16_002_281280x96029.jpg

 

The newer DE40LF with the smaller battery pack and rooftop HVAC system is numbered 8120-8339. Local transit fans affectionately refer to these as "second gens" pointing out that it is a new generation of DE40LF with a different appearance.

normal_2014-04-18_001_281280x96029.jpg

 

 

The Newest Flyers, the DE40LFRs, are numbered 8340-8559. These buses are simply referred to as restyles, as they are the only "Restyles" in the fleet (since the 800 series buses are trackless trolleys, no one anywhere calls them restyles)

normal_2011-12-23_007_281280x95829.jpg

 

 

 

And we have our newest buses, the NovaBus LFS HEV (both 40 foot and articulated models) The LFS 40 footers are supposed to arrive by the end of this year. The LFS Articulated HEV's are powered by a Cummins ISL 330HP engine and an Allison H 50 EP HybriDrive system. However like the previous 40 foot hybrids, the LFS 40 footers are powered by a Cummins ISL 280HP engine and an Allsion H 40 EP HybriDrive system. 

normal_2014-09-06_031_281280x96229.jpg

 

Since the Champion/Chevorlet cutaways aren't really seen regularly, I didn't include them in this listing. Once again, sorry for bumping this thread. I just figured some people would actually want to know a thing or two about the fleet...

 

 

**Note: All pictures taken by me

thank i was listening to the bus that travel near chestnut, walnut and 9 street area. i go to doctor in that section

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PAUL NUSSBAUM, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERLAST UPDATED: Monday, January 26, 2015, 5:57 PM
POSTED: Monday, January 26, 2015, 4:48 PM

 

 

SEPTA subways will remain open all night and Tuesday's Regional Rail trains will run on a Saturday schedule, as transit agencies respond to the impending snowstorm.

NJTransit will halt service Monday evening. No trains or buses will depart after 8 p.m. Service will resume "when conditions permit," NJTransit said.

SEPTA service was unaffected Monday, spokeswoman Jerri Williams said.

SEPTA will post planned bus detours for Tuesday on its website by 8 p.m. Monday, she said.

 

Late night service will be suspended for buses that usually replace Broad Street and Market-Frankford subway service, as the two subway lines will remain open all night. All other Nite Owl bus services will continue to operate.

Regional Rail trains will operate on a Saturday schedule on Tuesday, Williams said.

PATCO trains will operate normally Monday. On Tuesday, they will run every 10 minutes during morning and afternoon rush hours and every 15 minutes during nonpeak times, spokeswoman Fran O'Brien said.

 

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20150127_NJ_Transit_shutting_down__SEPTA_up_in_the_air.html#L6Ho7eC3dQpSZyZp.99

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thank i was listening to the bus that travel near chestnut, walnut and 9 street area. i go to doctor in that section

You  may wanna MiDis very soon, since the El Dorados are near its EOL. An extra 30 Nova LFSAs are coming in 2016, so that order brings the total Nova Artics to 185. The 90 40' Nova LFS is near completion, with 13 NABIs remaining in service (9 in Comly & 3 in Midvale, even though i haven't seen 5400 in a while)

 

This might be a trick question: Besides SEPTA, what other TA uses the numbering sequence for all fleets (not same numbers like NYCTA, NJT & WMATA use for theirs)

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