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Babylon to pay for study of rapid bus system

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The Town of Babylon has awarded a contract to a company to study a proposed bus rapid transit system on Route 110.

Town officials chose Parsons Brinckerhoff, of Manhattan, after sending out a request for proposals for technical assistance and consultation services on the proposed BRT line. The company’s fee -- $449,996 -- was in the middle among the three proposals, with one company coming in $18,000 lower and one $44,000 higher.

Payment for the contract will be broken down as follows: 80 percent by a grant from the Federal Transit Administration, 10 percent by the state, and 10 percent by the town. The study will be a logistical study, the next step after the town’s feasibility study completed two years ago. The study is expected to take 15 months, said town spokesman Kevin Bonner.

The final step is implementation, which he said would likely occur one to two years after the study is finished. The town would contract out for the buses, he said, and hopes to pay for the line through state and federal grants.

Bonner said the BRT line is expected to start near the LIRR station in Amityville Village and end near the Huntington Station train stop. The line is primarily geared toward workers in the Route 110 corridor but retail shoppers can also benefit, Bonner said.

Suffolk County is studying possible implementation of BRT lines elsewhere, such as Nicolls Road.

LINK: http://www.newsday.com/long-island/towns/long-island-now-1.1732330/babylon-to-pay-for-study-of-rapid-bus-system-1.7554768

 

More Info: http://ny-babylon.civicplus.com/DocumentCenter/View/393

Edited by Brett

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The Town of Babylon has awarded a contract to a company to study a proposed bus rapid transit system on Route 110.

 

Town officials chose Parsons Brinckerhoff, of Manhattan, after sending out a request for proposals for technical assistance and consultation services on the proposed BRT line. The company’s fee -- $449,996 -- was in the middle among the three proposals, with one company coming in $18,000 lower and one $44,000 higher.

 

Payment for the contract will be broken down as follows: 80 percent by a grant from the Federal Transit Administration, 10 percent by the state, and 10 percent by the town. The study will be a logistical study, the next step after the town’s feasibility study completed two years ago. The study is expected to take 15 months, said town spokesman Kevin Bonner.

 

The final step is implementation, which he said would likely occur one to two years after the study is finished. The town would contract out for the buses, he said, and hopes to pay for the line through state and federal grants.

 

Bonner said the BRT line is expected to start near the LIRR station in Amityville Village and end near the Huntington Station train stop. The line is primarily geared toward workers in the Route 110 corridor but retail shoppers can also benefit, Bonner said.

 

Suffolk County is studying possible implementation of BRT lines elsewhere, such as Nicolls Road.

 

LINK: http://www.newsday.com/long-island/towns/long-island-now-1.1732330/babylon-to-pay-for-study-of-rapid-bus-system-1.7554768

 

More Info: http://ny-babylon.civicplus.com/DocumentCenter/View/393

 

Good lord, I hope this may be the beginning of Suffolk Transit's possible "Golden Age"

 

In other words, we just need NICE to do the same thing, but that'll never happen. If the BRT service occurs, I wonder how the routing and the branding will be and how it will be marketed. I just hope they can market it well, since 110 is a busy corridor and can produce way more ridership than it currently is produce. And a potential stop should be SUNY Farmingdale, because that could be  very popular stop given that it's marketed well.

 

 

I would like to see these hubs occur. It's great that Suffolk and the MTA are working harder in order to boost ridership.

Edited by Q23 Central Terminal

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The study is expected to take 15 months, said town spokesman Kevin Bonner.

 

The final step is implementation, which he said would likely occur one to two years after the study is finished. 

 

:(

 

We're looking at 3 years here until implementation here, combine politics and not in my back yarders implementation will probably take longer than 27-39 months! 

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:(

 

We're looking at 3 years here until implementation here, combine politics and not in my back yarders implementation will probably take longer than 27-39 months! 

 

You think this is bad? Second Avenue would like to have a word with you :P

 

It's interesting to note that, if all goes well, this will be the second suburban BRT system in the country. (Montgomery County in DC is already starting to prep for it). If it does work out (and if the DMU scoots come to pass), Suffolk will have a very robust transit system.

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Good lord, I hope this may be the beginning of Suffolk Transit's possible "Golden Age"

 

 

I'd like to point out that this idea was first brought up when Ballone was Babylon Town Supervior, as what seemed to be a Town Bus Route. Now while many things could have changed since then, the fact that the Town of Babylon is paying for the study, and not the County, seems to suggest that the Town of Babylon would have some part of the route. 

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:(

 

We're looking at 3 years here until implementation here, combine politics and not in my back yarders implementation will probably take longer than 27-39 months! 

Are you sure you didn't mean 27-39 years !

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Good lord, I hope this may be the beginning of Suffolk Transit's possible "Golden Age"

 

In other words, we just need NICE to do the same thing, but that'll never happen. If the BRT service occurs, I wonder how the routing and the branding will be and how it will be marketed. I just hope they can market it well, since 110 is a busy corridor and can produce way more ridership than it currently is produce. And a potential stop should be SUNY Farmingdale, because that could be  very popular stop given that it's marketed well.

 

 

I would like to see these hubs occur. It's great that Suffolk and the MTA are working harder in order to boost ridership.

Dude with average operating speeds where would NICE even run BRT?  I was on an N6 local this evening and it was by no means slow in any way. Maybe northern Blvd but even that is a toss up.

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You think this is bad? Second Avenue would like to have a word with you :P

 

Second Ave?  Not in my area, don't care. :D

 

It's interesting to note that, if all goes well, this will be the second suburban BRT system in the country. (Montgomery County in DC is already starting to prep for it). If it does work out (and if the DMU scoots come to pass), Suffolk will have a very robust transit system.

 

Suffolk really should have done this study years ago, they should have done this BEFORE they started construction in Melville/Huntington and included a proper BRT lane in the project.   

 

Forget about BRT, I would've rather have seen lightrail down 110, lightrail would be a helluva lot better than BRT!

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Second Ave?  Not in my area, don't care. :D

 

 

Suffolk really should have done this study years ago, they should have done this BEFORE they started construction in Melville/Huntington and included a proper BRT lane in the project.   

 

Forget about BRT, I would've rather have seen lightrail down 110, lightrail would be a helluva lot better than BRT!

Bellone did a survey over five years ago when in Babylon, same questions, same results with a Pinelawn road option for BRT.  None of this means spit till the MTA goes forward with the plans for a 110 Hub in the next 300 years, they are there, need to be acted upon and financed.

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Second Ave?  Not in my area, don't care. :D

 

 

Suffolk really should have done this study years ago, they should have done this BEFORE they started construction in Melville/Huntington and included a proper BRT lane in the project.   

 

Forget about BRT, I would've rather have seen lightrail down 110, lightrail would be a helluva lot better than BRT!

 

The nice thing about good BRT is that if it's separated enough, you can install rails and wires down the damn thing and it'll be easy. The question is whether or not it's actually going to be separated enough.

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