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Pakenhamtrain

(AUS) People power frees trapped passenger

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A MAN had to be freed after getting trapped between a train and platform at a Perth station this morning. The commuter’s leg got stuck at Stirling Station about 8.50am causing a delay for the city-bound train. Nicolas Taylor said he and fellow passengers got off the train and worked together to free the man by pushing against the carriage away from the platform. The train moved on its suspension enough for the man to get out from the sticky situation. “He seemed to be a bit sheepish, because right where he fell was the ‘mind the gap’ writing.”
 
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Perth is a small city. Everybody looks out for each other.

 

That may have something to do with it but there is a video of a lady falling between the train and platform in Japan (I think) and everyone did the same thing people did here to reach for her.

 

Valiant effort from everyone here though.

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will new yorker do the same? i would because if you want to get moving , this is the only way to help out. let stop saying "&*^% this"

Edited by pjbr40
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will new yorker do the same? i would because if you want to get moving , this is the only way to help out. let stop saying "&*^% this"

It seems like others don't think that way. I've been on buses where the back door keeps cycling open and people just stand there. I've gone to the door and pulled it shut so the b/o can move on.

 

I've also been on buses where the people are getting off, and clearly there are others headed to the door and the person(s) standing by the door don't hold it open, they let it shut, and then it locks, and the person getting off has to yell up to the front for the B/O to open the door again.  :rolleyes:.

 

I've been on buses where there is clearly a line outside and people don't budge to make room or get out of the way.

 

I have one train example. A fight broke out on the (A) train and someone pulled the emergency cord. <_<

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Useless trivia. The trains and buses are run by the same agency,Transperth.

Transperth is just a brand name.

The trains are operated by Transperth Trains which is a division of the PTA

The bus network is contracted out by the PTA to private operators. In this case Path transit, sWAn transit and Transdev perth.

 

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Tis a weird situation.

Passengers help each other in nyc's subway too but in a different way.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/28/nyregion/a-rare-choreography-for-riders-caught-between-an-f-and-an-m.html?module=Search&mabReward=relbias%3As

Rare Choreography of Cooperation for Riders Caught Between an F and an M
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Christopher Gregory for The New York Times

The F and M trains, which stop at the same platform in much of Manhattan, are a level apart at the Delancey and Essex Streets station, where riders team up to monitor train screeches and displaced air to communicate which train is coming.

By MATT FLEGENHEIMER Published: December 27, 2012 They toil in a city of haggard indifference and missed connections, where the simplest task can devolve into a competitive sport.
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Christopher Gregory for The New York Times

After the word is passed about which train is arriving, however, the riders are on their own in getting on board.

 

But consider the altruists of the Sixth Avenue line on the Lower East Side, keepers of perhaps the most collaborative corner of the subway system.

Since the service cuts of 2010 rejiggered pieces of the transit map, the station at Delancey and Essex Streets has assumed a peculiar quirk: uptown F and M lines are physically segregated. For much of Manhattan, the two lines stop at the same stations and platforms; riders simply hop on the first arriving train.

But at Delancey Street, the F is downstairs, a short walk from the M, but hopelessly out of view from the other train’s platform. The M shares a track with downtown J and Z trains.

There are no station announcements to signal to riders which train will arrive first. There are no countdown clocks. And so the travelers help one another, communicating the hints they have trained their senses to capture: the pitch of a screech when a train comes to a halt — unique depending on the line, some insist; the rustling of newspapers, windswept by an oncoming train; the wave of a hand, the nod of a head, a pull on the top of a baseball cap, like a third-base coach advising his player to steal.

continued

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