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Sparen of Iria

Paris in August

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This August I went to Paris. And... yeah, let's just say that half their system was shut down for repairs. Except they were running like 30 TPH despite those repairs.

 

 

 

Now, Paris. This is NOT the correct way to advertise a weekend shutdown three weeks in advance.

PA-A28%20Line%204_zpsmsea4cn3.jpg

 

PA-A36%20M6%20Passy%20Station_zps7ukryyh

 

PA-A18%20M12%20Concorde%20Station_zpshc7

 

There are more photos but I think there are just too many to show.

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Don't be ridiculous.  Most Europeans take LONG vacations in the summertime, which is usually anytime from June through August, so it makes sense for them to shut down the way that they did.  It's laughable that you would even try to ridicule Europe's transportation system.  It is FAR superior and efficient to that of NYCT's transit system.  They actually invest in their systems. 

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I'll be the judge of that when I fly out there today, VG8. But from actual Parisians that I have met and spent a week with (this next week will be on their turf), ours is better. And yes, they have seen the ugly parts too, I made sure of that. From an unplanned service change due to a guy collapsing on the platform to having to sit in the station 5 minutes to connect to two trains to weekend diversions. The first thing they noticed, and their faces were very expressive about it, was the air conditioning. Secondly, the space. Thirdly, the 24-hour service. They could only say "Wow". 

 

We were making two short films, so a lot of travelling involved. Sadly, we could not see much afterward because this city is so big, travel times make that impossible without staying late. In Paris, though, it's around the size of Brooklyn. I asked if I can walk across the city in about 3 hours and the one person in the group who actually did it confirmed that. So with the much smaller city size and no part of the city being more than a third of a mile away from the Metro, we can easily do plenty of sightseeing after working.

 

I look forward to it, despite the non-AC.

Edited by LTA1992

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I'll be the judge of that when I fly out there today, VG8. But from actual Parisians that I have met and spent a week with (this next week will be on their turf), ours is better. And yes, they have seen the ugly parts too, I made sure of that. From an unplanned service change due to a guy collapsing on the platform to having to sit in the station 5 minutes to connect to two trains to weekend diversions. The first thing they noticed, and their faces were very expressive about it, was the air conditioning. Secondly, the space. Thirdly, the 24-hour service. They could only say "Wow". 

 

We were making two short films, so a lot of travelling involved. Sadly, we could not see much afterward because this city is so big, travel times make that impossible without staying late. In Paris, though, it's around the size of Brooklyn. I asked if I can walk across the city in about 3 hours and the one person in the group who actually did it confirmed that. So with the much smaller city size and no part of the city being more than a third of a mile away from the Metro, we can easily do plenty of sightseeing after working.

 

I look forward to it, despite the non-AC.

lol... Europeans are not big on AC so you'll have to suck it up.  I paid a pretty penny to rent my apartment (about $1,600 or so a month circa 2004 which would easily be $2,400 or so today for a one bedroom), but I made sure I had remote controlled heating and AC when I lived there.  Some parts can be quite muggy and oppressive, but it can be esp. bad during the summer.  I think a better thing to grade would be intercity travel or say Paris to London travel.  Intercity travel in Europe by rail some of the best around.  I knew of a guy in one of my college courses who used to travel from Florence (Italy) to Copenhagen (Denmark) via the train and loved it.  It was about 12 hours or so but he didn't care.  

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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I never said no AC is a problem. It's like going back in time to when the Redbirds were running and the AC was off. I have noticed though that depending on the car, it can be very hot and musty or quite cool. The cars on lines 7 and 8 are the coolest. The cars on lines 6 and 11 are in the middle but the cars on lines 1, 2, and 14 are the hottest. The newer cars, I think, because you cannot open the windows. I'm actually already planning a trip back to Paris because it's so great here and one thing I was researching was flying to London, then taking Eurostar to Paris. By the way, this was my first time flying and it was amazing.

 

The hostel I am in is in the 13th Androssiment and line 7 provides the most direct route to Chatelet. We are actually here on kind of an exchange program so I already have some friends here to show me around. I have two patisseries that I need to go back to. I'll have a full update when its all over.

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I never said no AC is a problem. It's like going back in time to when the Redbirds were running and the AC was off. I have noticed though that depending on the car, it can be very hot and musty or quite cool. The cars on lines 7 and 8 are the coolest. The cars on lines 6 and 11 are in the middle but the cars on lines 1, 2, and 14 are the hottest. The newer cars, I think, because you cannot open the windows. I'm actually already planning a trip back to Paris because it's so great here and one thing I was researching was flying to London, then taking Eurostar to Paris. By the way, this was my first time flying and it was amazing.

 

The hostel I am in is in the 13th Androssiment and line 7 provides the most direct route to Chatelet. We are actually here on kind of an exchange program so I already have some friends here to show me around. I have two patisseries that I need to go back to. I'll have a full update when its all over.

Your friends should help you with your français...  :lol: You're referring to the 13th arrondissement.  I'd call it an up and coming area... Lots of Asians (mainly Chinese) for the most part... Yes, go to the patisseries... I ate like a pig when I lived in Europe and LOST weight because they put preservatives and other crap in the food like they do here, unless of course you eat organic.  

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Note that trains on line 1 and 2 have some kind of AC but I don't know why it is not always functionning, especially on line 1 (it been a while that I haven't see one with the AC in function).  :( It was quite hard with the hatewave this summer.

About the closure notices, they tend to put it long before and they tend to remove it long after.  :D

 

About Paris being small, the City of Paris is small because unlike many other cities it hasn't absorbed its suburbs or at least its inner suburbs during the 20th century.

If you include the suburbs, the city is over 10 million and sprawls on about 1,000 sq mil. One of the largest in Europe, if not the largest.

 

 

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Your friends should help you with your français...  :lol: You're referring to the 13th arrondissement.  I'd call it an up and coming area... Lots of Asians (mainly Chinese) for the most part... Yes, go to the patisseries... I ate like a pig when I lived in Europe and LOST weight because they put preservatives and other crap in the food like they do here, unless of course you eat organic.  

It's mainly Chinese because it's the Chinese Quarter. But they are helping me, it's the pronunciations that take getting used to. Unlike Japanese where there is a set number of syllables which form combinations to make words, French pronunciations don't always follow the spelling. But a nice tip to note was that the last letter in the word isn't pronounced. So yay. Besides, it was only a week. The only place I've been where we could have drinks on some abandoned railroad ROW and the police don't give a crap. In fact, I think I've only seen 12 Police cars while I was there. Got an idea for a short film thanks to that.

 

Note that trains on line 1 and 2 have some kind of AC but I don't know why it is not always functionning, especially on line 1 (it been a while that I haven't see one with the AC in function).  :( It was quite hard with the hatewave this summer.

About the closure notices, they tend to put it long before and they tend to remove it long after.  :D

 

About Paris being small, the City of Paris is small because unlike many other cities it hasn't absorbed its suburbs or at least its inner suburbs during the 20th century.

If you include the suburbs, the city is over 10 million and sprawls on about 1,000 sq mil. One of the largest in Europe, if not the largest.

Interesting. I noticed that on the newer cars on lines 2, 5, and 9. But as you said, it usually isn't working. My favorite part of the system is, naturally, Line 6 on it's western elevated section. I covered quite a bit of ground while exploring and even accidentally found the poor mans tour bus. Route 69 takes you past Hotel de Ville, the Louvre, Hotel des Invalides, Notre Dame, and ends at Champ de Mars where the Eiffel Tower is. I think it started in Bastille but I didn't go from the beginning.

 

If anything, the best aspect of this last week was seeing Paris from the residents POV. Found great places to eat where no tourist usually go. Learned some cheat codes to the Metro. Already planning a trip back. Me and my new friends need to make a film together. 

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It's mainly Chinese because it's the Chinese Quarter. But they are helping me, it's the pronunciations that take getting used to. Unlike Japanese where there is a set number of syllables which form combinations to make words, French pronunciations don't always follow the spelling. But a nice tip to note was that the last letter in the word isn't pronounced. So yay. Besides, it was only a week. The only place I've been where we could have drinks on some abandoned railroad ROW and the police don't give a crap. In fact, I think I've only seen 12 Police cars while I was there. Got an idea for a short film thanks to that.

 

Interesting. I noticed that on the newer cars on lines 2, 5, and 9. But as you said, it usually isn't working. My favorite part of the system is, naturally, Line 6 on it's western elevated section. I covered quite a bit of ground while exploring and even accidentally found the poor mans tour bus. Route 69 takes you past Hotel de Ville, the Louvre, Hotel des Invalides, Notre Dame, and ends at Champ de Mars where the Eiffel Tower is. I think it started in Bastille but I didn't go from the beginning.

 

If anything, the best aspect of this last week was seeing Paris from the residents POV. Found great places to eat where no tourist usually go. Learned some cheat codes to the Metro. Already planning a trip back. Me and my new friends need to make a film together. 

Paris wouldn't be so great if they included those lovely suburbs (aka ghettos)... :lol:

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Most suburbs are middle class communities.

 

 I covered quite a bit of ground while exploring and even accidentally found the poor mans tour bus. Route 69 takes you past Hotel de Ville, the Louvre, Hotel des Invalides, Notre Dame, and ends at Champ de Mars where the Eiffel Tower is. I think it started in Bastille but I didn't go from the beginning.

 

The line 69 starts at Gambetta, east of Bastille.

 

bus%20ligne%2069b.jpg

 

I don't use the line 69 often, I mostly use the line 68 in Central Paris (Châtillon Montrouge - Place de Clichy).

Edited by Minato ku

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Yes I know but you have the ethnic ghettos too which are away from the chic parts of Paris...  :lol:

 Oh boy! Here we go again. Every topic you definitely don't disappoint I was waiting for the G word to appear.

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I never said no AC is a problem. It's like going back in time to when the Redbirds were running and the AC was off. I have noticed though that depending on the car, it can be very hot and musty or quite cool. The cars on lines 7 and 8 are the coolest. The cars on lines 6 and 11 are in the middle but the cars on lines 1, 2, and 14 are the hottest. The newer cars, I think, because you cannot open the windows. I'm actually already planning a trip back to Paris because it's so great here and one thing I was researching was flying to London, then taking Eurostar to Paris. By the way, this was my first time flying and it was amazing.

 

The hostel I am in is in the 13th Androssiment and line 7 provides the most direct route to Chatelet. We are actually here on kind of an exchange program so I already have some friends here to show me around. I have two patisseries that I need to go back to. I'll have a full update when its all over.

It's definitely the case with TFL as well most if not all the tube stock don't have AC I think the New S7/S8 cars do. London has a great system different from NY but great non the less.

Edited by RailRunRob

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