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Increasing the ADA-accessibilities to each ADA-accessible or potential ADA-accessible Subway Station


ACEVE14

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As many of you NYC Transit Forums members know that today marks the 2-month, 25th year anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Act of 1990. 2 months ago, many disabled people in wheelchairs across the U.S.A. rejoiced as they all come together to celebrate the 25 years of ADA. On Thursday July 26th, 1990, Then-U.S. president George H.W. Bush signed a bill into law that would require all disabled people to get accommodations being made for them. Because of that, many of them were able to take public transportation like trains, subways, and buses (or Access-A-Ride) to get to their destinations, have easier access to and from their houses, and to have the people they can respect and rely on. Which brings all of us here to this very important blog right here.

 

We all know that some MTA New York City Subway Stations throughout the 5 boroughs are ADA-accessible; some stations have elevators, others have wheelchair ramps, but what if there is a possibility that we can increase the accessibility of each ADA-accessible subway stop or each potential ADA-accessible subway stop by featuring both the elevators and wheelchair ramps (or escalators that can accommodate disabled passengers with wheelchairs) in that particular subway stop simultaneously? 'Can it be done', you ask? It can be done, if we played the cards right, study everything we need to know on each subway station, and make it all work at the right price within the MTA's budget, it will become a reality. I'll be answering all of your questions and provide you with each specific details regarding on which subway station I'm working on getting increased ADA-accessibility.

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I think it would be nice if Court Sq G) stair turned into wheelchair ramp, well as (E)(M) side platforms.


175th St (A)/George Washington Bridge Bus Station:

Replace elevator with wheelchair ramp that leading to George Washington Bridge Bus Station's Ft. Washington Av. Place either wheelchair ramp or inclined elevator to 1st and 2nd floor of bus station.

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I think it would be nice if Court Sq G) stair turned into wheelchair ramp, well as (E)(M) side platforms.

 

175th St (A)/George Washington Bridge Bus Station:

Replace elevator with wheelchair ramp that leading to George Washington Bridge Bus Station's Ft. Washington Av. Place either wheelchair ramp or inclined elevator to 1st and 2nd floor of bus station.

I agree, the Court Square (G) and Court Square-23rd St (E)(M) Stations do need to have some ADA-accessibility for once.

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Court Square 23rd St was not made ADA accessible for a reason, however. The transfer passageway is positioned in such a way that you would need to (on the Manhattan Bound platform), build a ramp UNDER to tracks, because there is a conveniently located exit right at the location that prevents installation of an elevator or ramp up to the transfer passageway.

 

As for the (G), I don't get why they can't shove a single elevator to the platform, let alone two.

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Court Square 23rd St was not made ADA accessible for a reason, however. The transfer passageway is positioned in such a way that you would need to (on the Manhattan Bound platform), build a ramp UNDER to tracks, because there is a conveniently located exit right at the location that prevents installation of an elevator or ramp up to the transfer passageway.

 

As for the (G), I don't get why they can't shove a single elevator to the platform, let alone two.

 

Soon. The MTA plans to make the (G) platform at Court Square accessible in the new capital program.

 

 

 

NYC Transit is on pace to make 100 stations fully accessible in accordance with ADA standards by 2020. With investments made through 2014, full ADA accessibility at 89 Key Stations will be complete or in progress. The proposed 2015-2019 Capital Program includes ADA investments at the final 11 Key Stations. These are: Times Square-42nd Street/Shuttle and Chambers Street/Nassau in Manhattan; Bedford Park Boulevard/Concourse and Gun Hill Road/Dyre in the Bronx; Astoria Boulevard/Astoria in Queens; and Bedford Avenue/Canarsie, 59th Street/4th Avenue, 86th Street/4th Avenue, Eastern Parkway-Brooklyn Museum/Eastern Parkway, Greenpoint Avenue/Crosstown, and Canarsie-Rockaway Parkway/Canarsie in Brooklyn. In addition, $100 million of ADA improvements are planned at non-Key Stations including, but not limited to, 1st Avenue/Canarsie and Court Square/Crosstown.
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Ramps are hard to construct because of their large footprint, as opposed to an elevator shaft. Wheelchair escalators don't really work because there needs to be a way to secure a wheelchair so someone doesn't end up falling over. They have stairwell wheelchair lifts, but those tend to be very slow and require an attendant.

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Ramps are hard to construct because of their large footprint, as opposed to an elevator shaft. Wheelchair escalators don't really work because there needs to be a way to secure a wheelchair so someone doesn't end up falling over. They have stairwell wheelchair lifts, but those tend to be very slow and require an attendant.

Maybe it couldn't hurt to have a bunch of stairwell wheelchair lifts too. I wonder if Acorn Stair Lifts might be interested in helping the MTA installing those lifts at some ADA-accessible Subway Stations. At the 42nd St-Port Authority Bus Terminal (A)(C)(E) Subway Station, there is an entrance at the southwest corner of 8th Av and W 44th St where an elevator and a lift both sit at that entrance, I don't know why (they should be unified into one elevator).

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Now then, let's continue with this business, shall we? I've come up with a bunch of test stations suitable to be accommodated for a pilot program, in which we could test out how they can handle twice the ADA-accessibility needs:

 

- 42nd St-Port Authority Bus Terminal (A)(C)(E)

- Fordham Road (B)(D)

- Gun Hill Road (5)

- 8th Av (N)

- New Utrecht Av-62nd St (D)(N)

- 149th St-Grand Concourse (2)(4)(5)

- 5th Av/42nd St-Bryant Park (B)(D)(F)(M)(7)

- 57th St-7th Av (N)(Q)(R)

- Mosholu Parkway (4)

- Chambers St-World Trade Center (A)(C)(E)

- Mets-Willets Point (7)

 

There'll be more hand-picked ADA Subway Stations in the future. I'll be back with more updates.

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Maybe it couldn't hurt to have a bunch of stairwell wheelchair lifts too. I wonder if Acorn Stair Lifts might be interested in helping the MTA installing those lifts at some ADA-accessible Subway Stations. At the 42nd St-Port Authority Bus Terminal (A)(C)(E) Subway Station, there is an entrance at the southwest corner of 8th Av and W 44th St where an elevator and a lift both sit at that entrance, I don't know why (they should be unified into one elevator).

 

The issue with stair lifts is that one, they need an attendant, and two, they basically make the rest of the stairwell useless while in operation. This is why you generally see them only on Asian subways; most of them are so new that they have massive escalator banks, so no one takes the stairs anyways.

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One station that could be made ADA accessible is Nostrand Avenue (A)(C). To do this, you would reopen the Bedford Avenue entrance and put an elevator somewhere along the corridor, preferably near the B44 SBS. For access to the lower level platform, you could either convert some of the stairways int wheelchair ramps or put an elevator in the old Arlington Place exit area.

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Converting stairways to ramps, although possible, depends on how long the stairwell is, and whether or not a large volume of people use the given stairwell. I haven't actually seen the platform at Nostrand Av, but although it may be possible, it's probably cheaper to convert a stairwell to an elevator than to convert it to a ramp.

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IMO the (MTA) should convert stairwells to elevators instead of converting them to ramps it will be cheaper and smarter let's not forget they are on a budget if they are attempting to make all of the subway stations ADA accessible they should use elevators.

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IMO the (MTA) should convert stairwells to elevators instead of converting them to ramps it will be cheaper and smarter let's not forget they are on a budget if they are attempting to make all of the subway stations ADA accessible they should use elevators.

 

The part about elevators that bugs me personally is how much they cost to maintain. If the MTA actually made all subway stations wheelchair accessible (which, by the way, is not possible), they'd probably spend a billion dollars each capital plan on repairing elevators and other ADA components alone.

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The part about elevators that bugs me personally is how much they cost to maintain. If the MTA actually made all subway stations wheelchair accessible (which, by the way, is not possible), they'd probably spend a billion dollars each capital plan on repairing elevators and other ADA components alone.

Agreed we all know that it isin't possible to make all the stations wheelchair accessible which is why it would be easier to repair elevators throughout the system it would probably would cost a billion dollars each capital plan but imagine how much it would cost converting stairwells to ramps for each capital plan
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IMO the (MTA) should convert stairwells to elevators instead of converting them to ramps it will be cheaper and smarter let's not forget they are on a budget if they are attempting to make all of the subway stations ADA accessible they should use elevators.

 

This isn't a good idea, because most stations don't exactly have low-use stairwells, and elevators take significantly longer to clear platforms than stairwells.

 

Converting stairways to ramps, although possible, depends on how long the stairwell is, and whether or not a large volume of people use the given stairwell. I haven't actually seen the platform at Nostrand Av, but although it may be possible, it's probably cheaper to convert a stairwell to an elevator than to convert it to a ramp.

 

To make it ADA accessible, you need a lot of space; not just length but width, due to the limits on how long ADA ramps can be. Ramps when properly designed can actually output more people than stairwells; thats why most of Grand Central has ramps and not stairwells.

 

Out of complete curiousity, where is that banner from?

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Out of complete curiousity, where is that banner from?

If you're wondering about my sig specifically, I'm making a diagrammatic map of NYC's subway system using SVG.

 

Do you know the specifics on ADA ramps? I mean, how many stories (potentially) can one be even with flat areas?

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If you're wondering about my sig specifically, I'm making a diagrammatic map of NYC's subway system using SVG.

 

Do you know the specifics on ADA ramps? I mean, how many stories (potentially) can one be even with flat areas?

 

This is the relevant section of the ADA.

 

So, the maximum rise of any ramp slope is 30 in, or approx 2.5 ft. With a maximum slope ratio of 1:12, this means that a ramp at the maximum slope can only be 30 feet long. Landings have to be 5 feet long, and if the landing turns the corner onto another ramp, it has to be 5 feet by 5 feet. Given a floor-to-ceiling height of 10 feet, you would need 120 feet of ramp and 18 feet of landings to make one level change.

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