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R10 1989

MTA Board Considers Using Platform Doors...

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Some members of the MTA board are once again advocating for subway

platform doors.

In the past, the MTA has talked of launching a pilot program to test platform

doors, but the agency has never followed through.

Board members we spoke to say platform doors, while costly, would protect

subway riders and help ease overcrowding.

"Those platform doors, which are in use in London, in use in Paris and in use

in many other cities, & which have had the effect, the direct effect, of limiting overcrowding," said board member Charles Moerdler.

 

Read more: Source

Edited by Harry
Modified for home page...
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I see the platform doors as more of a safety measure than an anti crowd measure because the doors could prevent people from falling onto the traCks at all.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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If stations like Brooklyn Bridge and 14 Street are overcrowded, they have the options of

 

a) reopening the side platforms

 

and

 

b) reopening Worth and/or 18th Streets.

 

Both of which would be better long-term investments than platform screen doors.

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They should be working on things like better on-time performance.  If I had a nickel for every time the (1)(2)(3) or (4)(5)(6) was delayed....  <_< Seems like every other day either or both of the aforementioned lines have some sort of signal problem, and thus you'll see (5) trains running via the 7th Avenue line.  Invest that money into maintaining the infrastructure.  I don't want my taxpayer dollars going toward this nonsense.  The platforms are overcrowded because they aren't providing enough damn trains.

 

During the rush you have to let several trains pass before you can get on and ride like a human being, otherwise, be prepared to be smashed in like a sardine can.  I simply refuse to ride like some savage.  It's ridiculous that it can take up to 30 minutes to go three three express stops.  

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8
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They should be working on things like better on-time performance.  If I had a nickel for every time the (1)(2)(3) or (4)(5)(6) was delayed....  <_< Seems like every other day either or both of the aforementioned lines have some sort of signal problem, and thus you'll see (5) trains running via the 7th Avenue line.  Invest that money into maintaining the infrastructure.  I don't want my taxpayer dollars going toward this nonsense.  The platforms are overcrowded because they aren't provided enough damn trains.

 

During the rush you have to let several trains pass before you can get on and ride like a human being, otherwise, be prepared to be smashed in like a sardine can.  I simply refuse to ride like some savage.  It's ridiculous that it can take up to 30 minutes to go three three express stops.  

You know the ole saying VG8...There either isn't enough cars or the line is already at max.. :D

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They should be working on things like better on-time performance.  If I had a nickel for every time the (1)(2)(3) or (4)(5)(6) was delayed....  <_< Seems like every other day either or both of the aforementioned lines have some sort of signal problem, and thus you'll see (5) trains running via the 7th Avenue line.  

 

CBTC with a backup signal system would fix that, but no the (7) needs it first... <_< 

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CBTC with a backup signal system would fix that, but no the (7) needs it first... <_< 

The (7) to a certain degree does need it, but the crowding on the (7) could be alleviated if they marketed the LIRR more and the express buses.  The (MTA) created the (7) problem and on top of that, the neighborhoods served by the (7) have been yelling to no end.  If they yelled like that about the alternatives available to some communities, who knows what they would've received by now.

 

You know the ole saying VG8...There either isn't enough cars or the line is already at max.. :D

Well it seems like during the rush they just can't keep up with the demand, and the situation is worsening every year.  I try to avoid using the subways where possible and opt for Metro-North when traveling within the city, but some of my trips involve going to the Upper East or Upper West Side where the subway is the only real option. I could take the (B) in some cases, but that line too has ridiculous waits during the rush.  It used to be that people would pass up the (B) for the (D) but now people take anything that comes because you don't know when the next one will come even though there's supposed to be one every 10 minutes (roughly).  Waiting almost 20 minutes during rush hour for one train is just insane.  I'll never understand how you can see 5 or 6 (F) trains before one (B) or (D) train comes.  

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The (7) to a certain degree does need it, but the crowding on the (7) could be alleviated if they marketed the LIRR more and the express buses.  The (MTA) created the (7) problem and on top of that, the neighborhoods served by the (7) have been yelling to no end.  If they yelled like that about the alternatives available to some communities, who knows what they would've received by now.

 

Well it seems like during the rush they just can't keep up with the demand, and the situation is worsening every year.  I try to avoid using the subways where possible and opt for Metro-North when traveling within the city, but some of my trips involve going to the Upper East or Upper West Side where the subway is the only real option. I could take the (B) in some cases, but that line too has ridiculous waits during the rush.  It used to be that people would pass up the (B) for the (D) but now people take anything that comes because you don't know when the next one will come even though there's supposed to be one every 10 minutes (roughly).  Waiting almost 20 minutes during rush hour for one train is just insane.  I'll never understand how you can see 5 or 6 (F) trains before one (B) or (D) train comes.  

I know what you mean....Same with 8av...You get like 4  (E) 's before a  (A)  (C)

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I know what you mean....Same with 8av...You get like 4  (E) 's before a  (A)  (C)

It seems like the more the focus on safety, the worse service becomes.  I personally don't think the (MTA) cares (about safety or reliability).  They're just obsessed with liability, so they're looking to mitigate risk more than anything else.

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  They're just obsessed with liability, so they're looking to mitigate risk more than anything else.

 

Well, that explains the arcane timers and fumigation rules that slow down service...

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Well, that explains the arcane timers and fumigation rules that slow down service...

Something else I notice when I take the subway now is the trains seem to almost crawl into the stations.  That has to slow down service considerably if you're riding for long distances.

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CBTC with a backup signal system would fix that, but no the (7) needs it first... <_< 

 

The reason it's on the (7) is because the (7) is isolated, making it an ideal test bed. You don't want new, unproven technology going haywire on your busiest line.

 

Also, the (7) is at guideline capacity at the rush, same as the (4)(5)(6) and (1)(2)(3).

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The reason it's on the (7) is because the (7) is isolated, making it an ideal test bed. You don't want new, unproven technology going haywire on your busiest line.

 

Also, the (7) is at guideline capacity at the rush, same as the (4)(5)(6) and (1)(2)(3).

My question is will CBTC make the (7) run any better from a reliability standpoint?

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People still get killed with these. They get stuck between the platform doors and the train. I can see this happening regularly. People will try to push through the platform doors like people do with the train doors.

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The platform doors is another example of the intellectual idiots forcing down our throats  a solution  where they throw our tax dollars to every problem that in their mind deserves a response. These geniuses who have gone to the most prestigious schools and think that they know everything only visit the subway or ride it when it is politically expedient, or in other words when their political rabbi has a photo op for the phony media. What these glorified paper pushers do not realize is that they themselves have created the very environment where the hate for the MTA is so bad that the juries would rather give someone who obviously should have never been on the subway in the first place money for something that should have never gone to trial in the first place.

 

The persons that deserve the money are the train operators, bus drivers and other transit personnel who just happen to be there when the incident occurs and bear the brunt of the mental patients, drunkards and other assorted people who land up on the subway tracks or in front of buses. Does anyone care about the employees? Obviously not for if they did, the political establishment would not be coming up with platform doors when the mental health establishment have done its job as well as the juries with the drunkards.

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People still get killed with these. They get stuck between the platform doors and the train. I can see this happening regularly. People will try to push through the platform doors like people do with the train doors.

 

Yes, but the odds of that happening are much lower than either someone falling onto the tracks or someone intentionally jumping out onto the tracks. Nothing is 100% foolproof; seatbelts aren't 100% effective at stopping deaths, does that mean we shouldn't have seatbelts?

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Seatbelts don't kill. These can. People are idiots. Vandals will find a way to ruin everything. How will garbage trains collect trash? How will station work that requires work trains work?

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How would platform screen doors help with overcrowding exactly? That's an... interesting take. 

 

Theoretically speaking, because PSDs mark where the doors are, you can reduce dwell time from people shuffling around to get to the doors.

 

Of course, this assumes that people entering will let people exit first and all of this goes on in an orderly fashion.

Seatbelts don't kill. These can. People are idiots. Vandals will find a way to ruin everything. How will garbage trains collect trash? How will station work that requires work trains work?

 

Well, how do they collect trash or do maintenance in the numerous systems that do have PSDs? They don't just let mounting piles of refuse and increasingly large amounts of disrepair occur. You might be surprised to know that people can learn new things and adjust the way they work to changing conditions.

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This seems to be a solution to the wrong problem. Platform screen doors in and of themselves aren't a big deal. Many systems around the world use them. But many of these systems also run their trains at higher frequencies. That is one big solution in reducing overcrowding. Building new subway lines is another solution.

 

But the way the MTA has gone about its business, I don't see them doing either anytime soon. And I wouldn't even trust it to install platform doors.

 

The platform doors is another example of the intellectual idiots forcing down our throats  a solution  where they throw our tax dollars to every problem that in their mind deserves a response. These geniuses who have gone to the most prestigious schools and think that they know everything only visit the subway or ride it when it is politically expedient, or in other words when their political rabbi has a photo op for the phony media. What these glorified paper pushers do not realize is that they themselves have created the very environment where the hate for the MTA is so bad that the juries would rather give someone who obviously should have never been on the subway in the first place money for something that should have never gone to trial in the first place.

 

The persons that deserve the money are the train operators, bus drivers and other transit personnel who just happen to be there when the incident occurs and bear the brunt of the mental patients, drunkards and other assorted people who land up on the subway tracks or in front of buses. Does anyone care about the employees? Obviously not for if they did, the political establishment would not be coming up with platform doors when the mental health establishment have done its job as well as the juries with the drunkards.

 

This is less than a legitimate complaint and more of you having an ax to grind, putting whatever you hate about the MTA together. Not everything crappy about the MTA revolves around pencil-pushing college graduates.

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In response to GojMet 86, I have no axe to grind as my point is that we live in an era where no matter how twisted or out of touch with reality the idea is, we are told that the idea has to be implemented to protect us from ourselves. The drunkard who boards the subway and falls is no longer responsible for his actions even though he knew that he should have never boarded the train in the first place. Neither is the mental patient who fails to take his/her medication is to be held responsible for their actions as they are free to roam the streets  as government has eliminated the mental hospitals. The problem which I referred to in the second sentence is that we have a group of individuals who come out of the top schools in the country but are clueless when it comes to the real world. In many cases they have become part of management that has its loyalty not to the taxpayers but to political leaders who are just interested in looking good in front of the media. The people that used to be in government who would challenge something like sliding platform doors are gone as they have retired and those that remain are too scared to take a stand. Who can blame them in today's world. where dissent is not tolerated.

When a person refuses to take responsibility for their actions, the victim becomes the person that had nothing to do with the individual's problems in the first place. I care about the train operator or bus driver who has worked so hard to be hired and have followed the rules. Then something that either the operator or the driver had no control over happens and that person's life in many cases is destroyed. It is like no one cares about this person who is the real victim in this matter.

Yes, I blame the MTA just like I blame the elected leaders who would rather cast off responsibility in matters such as this.Do the elected leaders want to face the reality that some people that are under medication are unfit to be allowed on the streets and reopen mental hospitals? I doubt it as it means that government made a mistake and government does not want to admit it.   We go through this every year around this time we hear the call for platform doors. Right after the first of the year, the idea will be forgotten until next year at this time when it will be dusted off again as history  will repeat itself.

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is coordinating stop position on stations with platform doors using MTA's old stock trains hard to do?

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is coordinating stop position on stations with platform doors using MTA's old stock trains hard to do?

No. It's difficult because the doors on older trains don't line up with the newer cars.

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