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DOB New Hire FAQ


SevenEleven
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11 hours ago, XBht26 said:

For example, if you pick the B17 for your run during the week, you must pick a B17 run on Saturday and/or Sunday. You can’t pick a B12 weekend run if you’re doing the B17. Unless you have a work run (which is covering the run when the person on the original run is off) you may be on another line that doesn’t interline with the line you picked. 

ahh ok, you ever do the fulton bus:bus_bullet_b25:? i bet its a run that kicks your tail i rode it up to the bridge end when i was up here for the holidays, i saw it on the google maps atleast most of them were an average of 10 minutes down or more

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just had a thought come into my head etc

Say you have a situation say your wife goes into labor  mom gets sick has to go to hospital or your sick and cant continue in service etc while your in service and have to get pulled off of service what happens?

Edited by BreeddekalbL
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  • 4 months later...
1 hour ago, Markito said:

Does anyone know how long after you start as a bus operator are you given vacation time and sick days ? And also how many of each ? 

You accrue vacation days after probation. So that’s a year. However you can accumulate AVA for working on paid holidays. You get regular 8 hours and then a paid day off. 

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9 hours ago, Markito said:

Does anyone know how long after you start as a bus operator are you given vacation time and sick days ? And also how many of each ? 

 

8 hours ago, lornaevo said:

You accrue vacation days after probation. So that’s a year. However you can accumulate AVA for working on paid holidays. You get regular 8 hours and then a paid day off. 

For the first year on, you get 1 vacation day every month, for a max of 10 days. You are able to use these days starting January 1st of the following year. For example, if you were to start on August 1st, you will accrue 4 vacation days. Since it is not 5 or more days, you won't pick a vacation week to have off. Instead, they will be extra days that you can use to request time off with. (With AVAs, your personal day, OTO time)

You can of course put in to have the whole week off with your AVAs, etc, and that would still be a vacation, right?

5 vacation days become a week, 10 days become 2 weeks. If you have weeks, then you will be picking your vacation during the system pick in Nocember-December. You can also elect to keep them as days, in which then they get used as I mentioned above.

After your first year, you will get the full 2 weeks to use on Jan 1st. Again, you pick your vacation weeks during system pick the month before.

----

Sick days for your first year is one day accrued for every month on probation. At the end of your probation, you will be credited the balance of what's owed to you. After that, you will get 12 days every year on May 1st.

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  • 11 months later...
On 7/29/2020 at 3:23 AM, SevenEleven said:

 

For the first year on, you get 1 vacation day every month, for a max of 10 days. You are able to use these days starting January 1st of the following year. For example, if you were to start on August 1st, you will accrue 4 vacation days. Since it is not 5 or more days, you won't pick a vacation week to have off. Instead, they will be extra days that you can use to request time off with. (With AVAs, your personal day, OTO time)

You can of course put in to have the whole week off with your AVAs, etc, and that would still be a vacation, right?

5 vacation days become a week, 10 days become 2 weeks. If you have weeks, then you will be picking your vacation during the system pick in Nocember-December. You can also elect to keep them as days, in which then they get used as I mentioned above.

After your first year, you will get the full 2 weeks to use on Jan 1st. Again, you pick your vacation weeks during system pick the month before.

----

Sick days for your first year is one day accrued for every month on probation. At the end of your probation, you will be credited the balance of what's owed to you. After that, you will get 12 days every year on May 1st.

To expand on the vacation banking are the days you accrue use it or lose it or can you build it up for say of you want to take a long vacation  further in your career 

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5 hours ago, BreeddekalbL said:

To expand on the vacation banking are the days you accrue use it or lose it or can you build it up for say of you want to take a long vacation  further in your career 

Use it or lose it. You only carry your AVAs and OTO time from year to year. 

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  • 1 month later...
On 11/23/2016 at 10:54 PM, SevenEleven said:

Similar to SubwayGuy's FAQ in regards to RTO, here's one for DOB.

 

What medical certification / driving type do I need for MTA?

If you are NOT going to be working in Staten Island, AND do not live out of state, you will need the Dr. Gary Kantrowitz

If you ARE going to be in Staten Island, (OR you live out of state) then you need the Non-Excepted Interstate (NI) driving type. This means you will need the medical certificate on file with DMV. The ONLY reason you need this is for the S89 route, which since it goes to Bayonne, means that it needs to be ran with DOT-certified drivers and buses. You do not need the NI type to do line training in SI and if you know for sure that you're not going to be touching the S89 line. If you are working the Extra List in Staten Island, Vacation Relief at Yukon or put in for OT (with no specifications), then you need it for the off chance that you'll work it. Please don't go out on the S89 without your medical card. DOT or the police pulls you over for a safety check, that's on you. (+The Ticket + Points + FMCSA Violation + The Discipline)

* You are responsible for having a current med cert. on file with DMV. DMV will automatically downgrade your license from a CDL to a regular driving license. You will get taken out of service when DMV notifies MTA that its expired. There's no penalty but no work = no pay.

 

What's the 9 point threshold for your license?

One of the 19A disqualifications is having 9 or more points on your license. You get those 9 points, you will no longer be "19A qualified", which means that you can't drive for the MTA. Again, there's no penalty for losing your qualification status but if there's no work for you, then there's no pay for you.

 

What's the 10 day training schedule?

Day 0 - At Zerega, you fill out 19A paperwork, start your permanent record, sign initial depot transfers if you want to work out of Staten Island or Queens. You will get your depot assignments for Days 1-7, as well as your passes.

 

Day 1 - Pre-trip inspections, learning the airbrake test, "L" turns, getting to know the bus. (The one freebie day)

Day 2- More "L" turns, hooks and acute turns

Day 3- Bus stops

Day 4 - "EL" pillars, parallel parking and straight line backing

Day 5 - Driving in Upper Manhattan

Day 6 - Driving in Lower Manhattan

Day 7 - First qualification day

Day 8 - Re-training day if you have to go to Day 9, otherwise equipment training

Day 9 - Second qualification day in Upper Manhattan

Day 10 - Last qualification day out of Zerega

 

I qualified. Now what happens?

Between Days 7 to 10, you will be doing equipment training on the RTS, Nova and New Flyer (Xcelsior) models while you wait for the rest of your class to qualify. After Day 10, you will go down to the union for Day 11 and be back at Zerega for Days 12-14. On Day 12, you will be there for General Instruction, where you will pick your depot. Days 13-14 will be spent on Customer Service and the Vision Zero classes. From Day 15 on, you will proceed to line training (or obtaining your CDL, if you have your permit)

 

How long is line training?

Depends on where you go. If you go anywhere but Staten Island, it will usually be 2 weeks. If you go to Staten Island, it will be approximately 6 weeks. During line training (not S.I), you will learn all of the lines assigned to your depot, local and express, usually in that order. If you are in S.I, you will rotate between Castleton, Yukon and the Charleston depots learning all the local lines in Staten Island for the first 3-4 weeks. For the remaining 2 weeks, you will ride around with the union learning the SI express routes. Regardless of how your class gets split, you will all be together for graduation after line training on the local lines.

 

What's this transfer paper that we sign on Day 0?

When you get hired, you are represented by TWU, which allows you to work in the Brooklyn TA depots and the Manhattan/Bronx OA depots. If you wish to work in Staten Island or Queens, which is represented by two different locals of ATU, you will have to request a transfer to either of these boros. When there is a space available for you, you will be asked if you want to transfer. It's an one shot deal and you can't return to any of the TWU represented depots, unless you originally was forced to S.I or Queens.

If you (or your entire class) gets forced to Staten Island or Queens, you will sign an additional transfer request, which will allow you to return to the TWU represented boros. It works the same way. They will ask you if you would like to come back when a spot opens up. If you deny it, you will be locked in to that boro for your career.

 

Important notes:

-Like I said, these transfers are one way, one shot deals. You only get two of them if you get forced to an ATU depot at the beginning. This is the only way that you will be allowed to work in SI/Queens and be able to return to BK/Bx/M. Of course, if your slot opens up and you say no, that's it, you're stuck.

-If you are waiting for your transfer to SI/Queens that you requested on Day 0, you will go to the bottom of the seniority list when you do transfer over.

-If you are working in Staten Island, you can change depots every year. (System pick) If you are in Queens, you are stuck at that depot for life. (Jamaica, Stengel, Queens Village) Queens does not have any system picks.

 

Uniforms

You will get measured on Day 11 when you're down at the union hall. The uniforms will take forever to come. They will come piece by piece, they may come in the wrong sizes. Until you get it straightened out, continue wearing the training uniform. If you are starting training in August-October, be aware that the transition from summer to winter uniforms occurs on October 15th. Don't get sent home/written up because you're out of uniform. Winter uniforms mean that you can't wear shorts and you need to wear your tie with both short/long sleeve shirts. If you are a student (read: Didn't graduate yet), then you cannot wear shorts at any time.

 

Benefits

See SubwayGuy's thread: http://www.nyctransitforums.com/forums/topic/49538-rto-new-hire-faq/

 

Tips

 

-Definitely whatever tips SubwayGuy mentioned in his thread.

 

-Definitely get your rest, eat and stay healthy. It takes one bad medical to disqualify you from driving and have you cleaning at the depot.

 

-Keep your license in shape too. You get it suspended or revoked, then they will say "Bye, we don't need you anymore." Know the driving laws that now apply to you now that you have a CDL, especially the 19A laws. If you at any time you are no longer a "19A Qualified" driver, then you won't be driving until you are qualified again. If you are required to keep a medical certificate on file, then you make sure you get the DOT medicals done and the paperwork submitted well before the old one expires. You can ask to go to the MAC to get this taken care of (See the General SLD). This is one of the common things that trips people up along with crossing the 9 point threshold.(See above for more info on both)

 

-Arrive early, 30 mins to 1 hr prior to your report time. When you're new and you're on your own, you won't be pre-tripping that bus and pulling out in those 5-10 minutes. Being early gives you the opportunity to take your time, get your OVCR card signed and give you some more time to deadhead to your first trip. MTA wants you to be on time twice a day -- reporting at the beginning of your run and any time you pull out from the depot.

 

-Don't be late.1 minute after your report time and your run is open for the operators sitting on the extra list. I'm working the extra list right now and I will gladly take your run with no shame. (And so will everyone else and MTA won't care) If it is hard to get to your work location, talk to your union reps and see how they can accommodate you. The earlier you bring up your issues, the better they can try to accommodate you. It's not an automatic thing but the goal for your first year is to get through probation with the cleanest record you can. Being AWOL, going sick because you can't make it to work won't work for you.

 

-Ask questions. No such thing as a stupid question. The more questions you ask, the more you'll understand the ins and outs of things. Know who to ask. It's okay to ask bus operators, dispatchers, etc., but you will have to figure out what's the legit answer/advice as opposed to bull. I'm not saying that anyone will lead you astray but there are people who will give you the wrong advice with the best intentions of helping you. When in doubt, definitely ask your union reps. Most of the time when someone can't give you a clear answer, they will direct you to the union... even if they do know the answer, they will tell you to ask the union. Also, ask if you're unsure. If you are on the road and unsure of something like the route, operating procedures, call console.

 

-Drive slow and always go back to what you've learned at Zerega. Zerega is your basics and over time, you will fine tune your operation for the real world. Try not to run any yellows. It's going to happen but try your best not to run them. Definitely don't run any reds, that will get you fired depending on the severity of it. If you're late, you will get put back on time. (Trust me, I've gotten placed several times already) If you're working a route that goes to the SI ferry, they will pressure you to get the ferry on time to make the boat. Dub it. I did it during line training. You get busted for speeding or an accident as a result thereof, it's on you. These people are not going to be giving you that $1100 every two weeks if you get fired. Also, no letting anyone out in the middle of the street. If there's no curb next to your bus, the answer is no. Don't let these people pressure you to do the wrong thing.

 

-Cover your ass. Unless it's a bus on it's first day of service, it's going to have damage. Write it up on your OVCR card and get it signed by the yard dispatcher before you go. This way, you won't be liable for the damage if let's say, the operator before you did the damage and didn't write it up. (You both go down if you didn't write it up) If the yard dispatcher refuses to sign, refuse the bus and ask for a new one. If you get a hard time past this, go to the union. When you're doing reliefs, if the operator that you're relieving can not explain the damage on the bus, refuse the bus. Something happens en route, write it on your trip sheet. Calls to console are recorded. Know who's who at the depot. Names are usually sufficient for management but if need be, get their pass #s for your reports.

 

-You will get warned countless times on what gets your probation extended. Don't get your probation extended. An extra 6 months of probation and undercover rides won't make it any easier on you, just because you didn't do something simple such as announcing your ADAs. Other things as driving with one hand, taking turns too fast, getting too many "bad rides", triggering the door alarm, running those yellows/reds will get you extended and/or taken out of service. Don't get extended, don't get taken out of service. Definitely don't be that much of a "F UP" to get extended twice and have to do a 2 year stint because at that point, you deserve to be fired. (Not that I wish that on you but you usually get extended once, and fired the second time)

 

-Keep in contact with your class and encourage them throughout training. This is the one support system that you'll have during your time here who actually understands everything going on with you and the job. People on the outside may or may not hold your thoughts, complaints, etc., with the same value because they don't understand. Also, you will be able to share information and answer each other's questions when not at work, etc.

 

-Save a few AVAs (holidays) in the beginning. This way, if you need a day off for an emergency, you will be able to take it without it being counted as "bad time off". If you're on probation, you have to pay back your bad time off in the form of your probation being extended day for day.

 

-Make the sacrifices. It's all part of the job. The job gets easier everyday after training. My class got forced to SI and only 4 of us live there. Yet, we are all making it happen. (And all but 4 of us stayed in SI too!) Do the best you can. A situation like this can and definitely will come across your way and if you think it won't, wait until you're stuck at the depot on mandatory report.

 

-Be happy, be positive, don't take all the insults personal. Enjoy the job.

 

-PM me with any questions. 100% of them, I will tell you to ask the union but feel free to ask nonetheless.

Regarding the CDL B Permit type; I have a Exepted Intrastate CDL B Permit without a medical cert. Im currently waiting for my email for Lab testing. Should I get the DMV Med cert done  or is this part of the Labs done at 180 Livingston?? Apologies if this was already discussed.

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13 minutes ago, SevenEleven said:

You need to go to DMV and change the type to NI. (Non Excepted Interstate) You can keep the A3 restriction on it though. 

13 minutes ago, SevenEleven said:

You need to go to DMV and change the type to NI. (Non Excepted Interstate) You can keep the A3 restriction on it though. 

On 11/23/2016 at 10:54 PM, SevenEleven said:

Similar to SubwayGuy's FAQ in regards to RTO, here's one for DOB.

 

What medical certification / driving type do I need for MTA?

If you are NOT going to be working in Staten Island, AND do not live out of state, you will need the Dr. Gary Kantrowitz

If you ARE going to be in Staten Island, (OR you live out of state) then you need the Non-Excepted Interstate (NI) driving type. This means you will need the medical certificate on file with DMV. The ONLY reason you need this is for the S89 route, which since it goes to Bayonne, means that it needs to be ran with DOT-certified drivers and buses. You do not need the NI type to do line training in SI and if you know for sure that you're not going to be touching the S89 line. If you are working the Extra List in Staten Island, Vacation Relief at Yukon or put in for OT (with no specifications), then you need it for the off chance that you'll work it. Please don't go out on the S89 without your medical card. DOT or the police pulls you over for a safety check, that's on you. (+The Ticket + Points + FMCSA Violation + The Discipline)

* You are responsible for having a current med cert. on file with DMV. DMV will automatically downgrade your license from a CDL to a regular driving license. You will get taken out of service when DMV notifies MTA that its expired. There's no penalty but no work = no pay.

 

What's the 9 point threshold for your license?

One of the 19A disqualifications is having 9 or more points on your license. You get those 9 points, you will no longer be "19A qualified", which means that you can't drive for the MTA. Again, there's no penalty for losing your qualification status but if there's no work for you, then there's no pay for you.

 

What's the 10 day training schedule?

Day 0 - At Zerega, you fill out 19A paperwork, start your permanent record, sign initial depot transfers if you want to work out of Staten Island or Queens. You will get your depot assignments for Days 1-7, as well as your passes.

 

Day 1 - Pre-trip inspections, learning the airbrake test, "L" turns, getting to know the bus. (The one freebie day)

Day 2- More "L" turns, hooks and acute turns

Day 3- Bus stops

Day 4 - "EL" pillars, parallel parking and straight line backing

Day 5 - Driving in Upper Manhattan

Day 6 - Driving in Lower Manhattan

Day 7 - First qualification day

Day 8 - Re-training day if you have to go to Day 9, otherwise equipment training

Day 9 - Second qualification day in Upper Manhattan

Day 10 - Last qualification day out of Zerega

 

I qualified. Now what happens?

Between Days 7 to 10, you will be doing equipment training on the RTS, Nova and New Flyer (Xcelsior) models while you wait for the rest of your class to qualify. After Day 10, you will go down to the union for Day 11 and be back at Zerega for Days 12-14. On Day 12, you will be there for General Instruction, where you will pick your depot. Days 13-14 will be spent on Customer Service and the Vision Zero classes. From Day 15 on, you will proceed to line training (or obtaining your CDL, if you have your permit)

 

How long is line training?

Depends on where you go. If you go anywhere but Staten Island, it will usually be 2 weeks. If you go to Staten Island, it will be approximately 6 weeks. During line training (not S.I), you will learn all of the lines assigned to your depot, local and express, usually in that order. If you are in S.I, you will rotate between Castleton, Yukon and the Charleston depots learning all the local lines in Staten Island for the first 3-4 weeks. For the remaining 2 weeks, you will ride around with the union learning the SI express routes. Regardless of how your class gets split, you will all be together for graduation after line training on the local lines.

 

What's this transfer paper that we sign on Day 0?

When you get hired, you are represented by TWU, which allows you to work in the Brooklyn TA depots and the Manhattan/Bronx OA depots. If you wish to work in Staten Island or Queens, which is represented by two different locals of ATU, you will have to request a transfer to either of these boros. When there is a space available for you, you will be asked if you want to transfer. It's an one shot deal and you can't return to any of the TWU represented depots, unless you originally was forced to S.I or Queens.

If you (or your entire class) gets forced to Staten Island or Queens, you will sign an additional transfer request, which will allow you to return to the TWU represented boros. It works the same way. They will ask you if you would like to come back when a spot opens up. If you deny it, you will be locked in to that boro for your career.

 

Important notes:

-Like I said, these transfers are one way, one shot deals. You only get two of them if you get forced to an ATU depot at the beginning. This is the only way that you will be allowed to work in SI/Queens and be able to return to BK/Bx/M. Of course, if your slot opens up and you say no, that's it, you're stuck.

-If you are waiting for your transfer to SI/Queens that you requested on Day 0, you will go to the bottom of the seniority list when you do transfer over.

-If you are working in Staten Island, you can change depots every year. (System pick) If you are in Queens, you are stuck at that depot for life. (Jamaica, Stengel, Queens Village) Queens does not have any system picks.

 

Uniforms

You will get measured on Day 11 when you're down at the union hall. The uniforms will take forever to come. They will come piece by piece, they may come in the wrong sizes. Until you get it straightened out, continue wearing the training uniform. If you are starting training in August-October, be aware that the transition from summer to winter uniforms occurs on October 15th. Don't get sent home/written up because you're out of uniform. Winter uniforms mean that you can't wear shorts and you need to wear your tie with both short/long sleeve shirts. If you are a student (read: Didn't graduate yet), then you cannot wear shorts at any time.

 

Benefits

See SubwayGuy's thread: http://www.nyctransitforums.com/forums/topic/49538-rto-new-hire-faq/

 

Tips

 

-Definitely whatever tips SubwayGuy mentioned in his thread.

 

-Definitely get your rest, eat and stay healthy. It takes one bad medical to disqualify you from driving and have you cleaning at the depot.

 

-Keep your license in shape too. You get it suspended or revoked, then they will say "Bye, we don't need you anymore." Know the driving laws that now apply to you now that you have a CDL, especially the 19A laws. If you at any time you are no longer a "19A Qualified" driver, then you won't be driving until you are qualified again. If you are required to keep a medical certificate on file, then you make sure you get the DOT medicals done and the paperwork submitted well before the old one expires. You can ask to go to the MAC to get this taken care of (See the General SLD). This is one of the common things that trips people up along with crossing the 9 point threshold.(See above for more info on both)

 

-Arrive early, 30 mins to 1 hr prior to your report time. When you're new and you're on your own, you won't be pre-tripping that bus and pulling out in those 5-10 minutes. Being early gives you the opportunity to take your time, get your OVCR card signed and give you some more time to deadhead to your first trip. MTA wants you to be on time twice a day -- reporting at the beginning of your run and any time you pull out from the depot.

 

-Don't be late.1 minute after your report time and your run is open for the operators sitting on the extra list. I'm working the extra list right now and I will gladly take your run with no shame. (And so will everyone else and MTA won't care) If it is hard to get to your work location, talk to your union reps and see how they can accommodate you. The earlier you bring up your issues, the better they can try to accommodate you. It's not an automatic thing but the goal for your first year is to get through probation with the cleanest record you can. Being AWOL, going sick because you can't make it to work won't work for you.

 

-Ask questions. No such thing as a stupid question. The more questions you ask, the more you'll understand the ins and outs of things. Know who to ask. It's okay to ask bus operators, dispatchers, etc., but you will have to figure out what's the legit answer/advice as opposed to bull. I'm not saying that anyone will lead you astray but there are people who will give you the wrong advice with the best intentions of helping you. When in doubt, definitely ask your union reps. Most of the time when someone can't give you a clear answer, they will direct you to the union... even if they do know the answer, they will tell you to ask the union. Also, ask if you're unsure. If you are on the road and unsure of something like the route, operating procedures, call console.

 

-Drive slow and always go back to what you've learned at Zerega. Zerega is your basics and over time, you will fine tune your operation for the real world. Try not to run any yellows. It's going to happen but try your best not to run them. Definitely don't run any reds, that will get you fired depending on the severity of it. If you're late, you will get put back on time. (Trust me, I've gotten placed several times already) If you're working a route that goes to the SI ferry, they will pressure you to get the ferry on time to make the boat. Dub it. I did it during line training. You get busted for speeding or an accident as a result thereof, it's on you. These people are not going to be giving you that $1100 every two weeks if you get fired. Also, no letting anyone out in the middle of the street. If there's no curb next to your bus, the answer is no. Don't let these people pressure you to do the wrong thing.

 

-Cover your ass. Unless it's a bus on it's first day of service, it's going to have damage. Write it up on your OVCR card and get it signed by the yard dispatcher before you go. This way, you won't be liable for the damage if let's say, the operator before you did the damage and didn't write it up. (You both go down if you didn't write it up) If the yard dispatcher refuses to sign, refuse the bus and ask for a new one. If you get a hard time past this, go to the union. When you're doing reliefs, if the operator that you're relieving can not explain the damage on the bus, refuse the bus. Something happens en route, write it on your trip sheet. Calls to console are recorded. Know who's who at the depot. Names are usually sufficient for management but if need be, get their pass #s for your reports.

 

-You will get warned countless times on what gets your probation extended. Don't get your probation extended. An extra 6 months of probation and undercover rides won't make it any easier on you, just because you didn't do something simple such as announcing your ADAs. Other things as driving with one hand, taking turns too fast, getting too many "bad rides", triggering the door alarm, running those yellows/reds will get you extended and/or taken out of service. Don't get extended, don't get taken out of service. Definitely don't be that much of a "F UP" to get extended twice and have to do a 2 year stint because at that point, you deserve to be fired. (Not that I wish that on you but you usually get extended once, and fired the second time)

 

-Keep in contact with your class and encourage them throughout training. This is the one support system that you'll have during your time here who actually understands everything going on with you and the job. People on the outside may or may not hold your thoughts, complaints, etc., with the same value because they don't understand. Also, you will be able to share information and answer each other's questions when not at work, etc.

 

-Save a few AVAs (holidays) in the beginning. This way, if you need a day off for an emergency, you will be able to take it without it being counted as "bad time off". If you're on probation, you have to pay back your bad time off in the form of your probation being extended day for day.

 

-Make the sacrifices. It's all part of the job. The job gets easier everyday after training. My class got forced to SI and only 4 of us live there. Yet, we are all making it happen. (And all but 4 of us stayed in SI too!) Do the best you can. A situation like this can and definitely will come across your way and if you think it won't, wait until you're stuck at the depot on mandatory report.

 

-Be happy, be positive, don't take all the insults personal. Enjoy the job.

 

-PM me with any questions. 100% of them, I will tell you to ask the union but feel free to ask nonetheless.

Regarding the CDL B Permit type; I have a Exepted Intrastate CDL B Permit without a medical cert. Im currently waiting for my email for Lab testing. Should I get the DMV Med cert done  or is this part of the Labs done at 180 Livingston?? Apologies if this was already discussed.

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Thanks for the quick reply 7Eleven. Have my labs tomorrow at 180 Livingston. If I go to DMV afterwards is it usually an easy process. I just psased my exam today and got my temporary permit. Do I also need to get my Med Certificate for this or no??

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4 hours ago, SevenEleven said:

You can keep the A3 restriction on it though. 

 

4 hours ago, BigBlueNYG said:

Do I also need to get my Med Certificate for this or no??

According to the middle of the second page of this online PDF document, the "A3" restriction means that you are Exempt from having a Medical Certificate on file with the DMV in Albany. Therefore, the answer to your question is no.

Good luck!!

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On 11/23/2016 at 10:54 PM, SevenEleven said:

Similar to SubwayGuy's FAQ in regards to RTO, here's one for DOB.

 

What medical certification / driving type do I need for MTA?

If you are NOT going to be working in Staten Island, AND do not live out of state, you will need the Excepted Interstate (EI) driving type. This will give you the A3 restriction (Med Cert. exempt) on your CDL. This means that you do not need to have a current medical certificate on file with the DMV.

If you ARE going to be in Staten Island, (OR you live out of state) then you need the Non-Excepted Interstate (NI) driving type. This means you will need the medical certificate on file with DMV. The ONLY reason you need this is for the S89 route, which since it goes to Bayonne, means that it needs to be ran with DOT-certified drivers and buses. You do not need the NI type to do line training in SI and if you know for sure that you're not going to be touching the S89 line. If you are working the Extra List in Staten Island, Vacation Relief at Yukon or put in for OT (with no specifications), then you need it for the off chance that you'll work it. Please don't go out on the S89 without your medical card. DOT or the police pulls you over for a safety check, that's on you. (+The Ticket + Points + FMCSA Violation + The Discipline)

* You are responsible for having a current med cert. on file with DMV. DMV will automatically downgrade your license from a CDL to a regular driving license. You will get taken out of service when DMV notifies MTA that its expired. There's no penalty but no work = no pay.

 

What's the 9 point threshold for your license?

One of the 19A disqualifications is having 9 or more points on your license. You get those 9 points, you will no longer be "19A qualified", which means that you can't drive for the MTA. Again, there's no penalty for losing your qualification status but if there's no work for you, then there's no pay for you.

 

What's the 10 day training schedule?

Day 0 - At Zerega, you fill out 19A paperwork, start your permanent record, sign initial depot transfers if you want to work out of Staten Island or Queens. You will get your depot assignments for Days 1-7, as well as your passes.

 

Day 1 - Pre-trip inspections, learning the airbrake test, "L" turns, getting to know the bus. (The one freebie day)

Day 2- More "L" turns, hooks and acute turns

Day 3- Bus stops

Day 4 - "EL" pillars, parallel parking and straight line backing

Day 5 - Driving in Upper Manhattan

Day 6 - Driving in Lower Manhattan

Day 7 - First qualification day

Day 8 - Re-training day if you have to go to Day 9, otherwise equipment training

Day 9 - Second qualification day in Upper Manhattan

Day 10 - Last qualification day out of Zerega

 

I qualified. Now what happens?

Between Days 7 to 10, you will be doing equipment training on the RTS, Nova and New Flyer (Xcelsior) models while you wait for the rest of your class to qualify. After Day 10, you will go down to the union for Day 11 and be back at Zerega for Days 12-14. On Day 12, you will be there for General Instruction, where you will pick your depot. Days 13-14 will be spent on Customer Service and the Vision Zero classes. From Day 15 on, you will proceed to line training (or obtaining your CDL, if you have your permit)

 

How long is line training?

Depends on where you go. If you go anywhere but Staten Island, it will usually be 2 weeks. If you go to Staten Island, it will be approximately 6 weeks. During line training (not S.I), you will learn all of the lines assigned to your depot, local and express, usually in that order. If you are in S.I, you will rotate between Castleton, Yukon and the Charleston depots learning all the local lines in Staten Island for the first 3-4 weeks. For the remaining 2 weeks, you will ride around with the union learning the SI express routes. Regardless of how your class gets split, you will all be together for graduation after line training on the local lines.

 

What's this transfer paper that we sign on Day 0?

When you get hired, you are represented by TWU, which allows you to work in the Brooklyn TA depots and the Manhattan/Bronx OA depots. If you wish to work in Staten Island or Queens, which is represented by two different locals of ATU, you will have to request a transfer to either of these boros. When there is a space available for you, you will be asked if you want to transfer. It's an one shot deal and you can't return to any of the TWU represented depots, unless you originally was forced to S.I or Queens.

If you (or your entire class) gets forced to Staten Island or Queens, you will sign an additional transfer request, which will allow you to return to the TWU represented boros. It works the same way. They will ask you if you would like to come back when a spot opens up. If you deny it, you will be locked in to that boro for your career.

 

Important notes:

-Like I said, these transfers are one way, one shot deals. You only get two of them if you get forced to an ATU depot at the beginning. This is the only way that you will be allowed to work in SI/Queens and be able to return to BK/Bx/M. Of course, if your slot opens up and you say no, that's it, you're stuck.

-If you are waiting for your transfer to SI/Queens that you requested on Day 0, you will go to the bottom of the seniority list when you do transfer over.

-If you are working in Staten Island, you can change depots every year. (System pick) If you are in Queens, you are stuck at that depot for life. (Jamaica, Stengel, Queens Village) Queens does not have any system picks.

 

Uniforms

You will get measured on Day 11 when you're down at the union hall. The uniforms will take forever to come. They will come piece by piece, they may come in the wrong sizes. Until you get it straightened out, continue wearing the training uniform. If you are starting training in August-October, be aware that the transition from summer to winter uniforms occurs on October 15th. Don't get sent home/written up because you're out of uniform. Winter uniforms mean that you can't wear shorts and you need to wear your tie with both short/long sleeve shirts. If you are a student (read: Didn't graduate yet), then you cannot wear shorts at any time.

 

Benefits

See SubwayGuy's thread: http://www.nyctransitforums.com/forums/topic/49538-rto-new-hire-faq/

 

Tips

 

-Definitely whatever tips SubwayGuy mentioned in his thread.

 

-Definitely get your rest, eat and stay healthy. It takes one bad medical to disqualify you from driving and have you cleaning at the depot.

 

-Keep your license in shape too. You get it suspended or revoked, then they will say "Bye, we don't need you anymore." Know the driving laws that now apply to you now that you have a CDL, especially the 19A laws. If you at any time you are no longer a "19A Qualified" driver, then you won't be driving until you are qualified again. If you are required to keep a medical certificate on file, then you make sure you get the DOT medicals done and the paperwork submitted well before the old one expires. You can ask to go to the MAC to get this taken care of (See the General SLD). This is one of the common things that trips people up along with crossing the 9 point threshold.(See above for more info on both)

 

-Arrive early, 30 mins to 1 hr prior to your report time. When you're new and you're on your own, you won't be pre-tripping that bus and pulling out in those 5-10 minutes. Being early gives you the opportunity to take your time, get your OVCR card signed and give you some more time to deadhead to your first trip. MTA wants you to be on time twice a day -- reporting at the beginning of your run and any time you pull out from the depot.

 

-Don't be late.1 minute after your report time and your run is open for the operators sitting on the extra list. I'm working the extra list right now and I will gladly take your run with no shame. (And so will everyone else and MTA won't care) If it is hard to get to your work location, talk to your union reps and see how they can accommodate you. The earlier you bring up your issues, the better they can try to accommodate you. It's not an automatic thing but the goal for your first year is to get through probation with the cleanest record you can. Being AWOL, going sick because you can't make it to work won't work for you.

 

-Ask questions. No such thing as a stupid question. The more questions you ask, the more you'll understand the ins and outs of things. Know who to ask. It's okay to ask bus operators, dispatchers, etc., but you will have to figure out what's the legit answer/advice as opposed to bull. I'm not saying that anyone will lead you astray but there are people who will give you the wrong advice with the best intentions of helping you. When in doubt, definitely ask your union reps. Most of the time when someone can't give you a clear answer, they will direct you to the union... even if they do know the answer, they will tell you to ask the union. Also, ask if you're unsure. If you are on the road and unsure of something like the route, operating procedures, call console.

 

-Drive slow and always go back to what you've learned at Zerega. Zerega is your basics and over time, you will fine tune your operation for the real world. Try not to run any yellows. It's going to happen but try your best not to run them. Definitely don't run any reds, that will get you fired depending on the severity of it. If you're late, you will get put back on time. (Trust me, I've gotten placed several times already) If you're working a route that goes to the SI ferry, they will pressure you to get the ferry on time to make the boat. Dub it. I did it during line training. You get busted for speeding or an accident as a result thereof, it's on you. These people are not going to be giving you that $1100 every two weeks if you get fired. Also, no letting anyone out in the middle of the street. If there's no curb next to your bus, the answer is no. Don't let these people pressure you to do the wrong thing.

 

-Cover your ass. Unless it's a bus on it's first day of service, it's going to have damage. Write it up on your OVCR card and get it signed by the yard dispatcher before you go. This way, you won't be liable for the damage if let's say, the operator before you did the damage and didn't write it up. (You both go down if you didn't write it up) If the yard dispatcher refuses to sign, refuse the bus and ask for a new one. If you get a hard time past this, go to the union. When you're doing reliefs, if the operator that you're relieving can not explain the damage on the bus, refuse the bus. Something happens en route, write it on your trip sheet. Calls to console are recorded. Know who's who at the depot. Names are usually sufficient for management but if need be, get their pass #s for your reports.

 

-You will get warned countless times on what gets your probation extended. Don't get your probation extended. An extra 6 months of probation and undercover rides won't make it any easier on you, just because you didn't do something simple such as announcing your ADAs. Other things as driving with one hand, taking turns too fast, getting too many "bad rides", triggering the door alarm, running those yellows/reds will get you extended and/or taken out of service. Don't get extended, don't get taken out of service. Definitely don't be that much of a "F UP" to get extended twice and have to do a 2 year stint because at that point, you deserve to be fired. (Not that I wish that on you but you usually get extended once, and fired the second time)

 

-Keep in contact with your class and encourage them throughout training. This is the one support system that you'll have during your time here who actually understands everything going on with you and the job. People on the outside may or may not hold your thoughts, complaints, etc., with the same value because they don't understand. Also, you will be able to share information and answer each other's questions when not at work, etc.

 

-Save a few AVAs (holidays) in the beginning. This way, if you need a day off for an emergency, you will be able to take it without it being counted as "bad time off". If you're on probation, you have to pay back your bad time off in the form of your probation being extended day for day.

 

-Make the sacrifices. It's all part of the job. The job gets easier everyday after training. My class got forced to SI and only 4 of us live there. Yet, we are all making it happen. (And all but 4 of us stayed in SI too!) Do the best you can. A situation like this can and definitely will come across your way and if you think it won't, wait until you're stuck at the depot on mandatory report.

 

-Be happy, be positive, don't take all the insults personal. Enjoy the job.

 

-PM me with any questions. 100% of them, I will tell you to ask the union but feel free to ask nonetheless.

This is an awesome read. Thanks. I appreciate all the info. I report tomorrow to Zerega for day 0. I'm so excited👍

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