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Fix & Fortify - 14th Street (L Train) Tunnels Closure

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On 10/14/2018 at 1:50 AM, gravescend179 said:

during the shutdown I mean. 

Right. And there won’t be...just the weekend/late night (M) going there. Neither the 6th Ave Line nor the Williamsburg Bridge will be able to handle any additional to/from trains (called T or not) during weekdays.

Edited by T to Dyre Avenue

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http://www.mta.info/news/2018/10/24/additional-service-2019-l-train-tunnel-reconstruction

I had to take a picture of the service changes because they didn't come out the way I wanted to when I initially copied and pasted this

Quote

(L) train riders in search of additional alternative service options during next year's (L) Tunnel reconstruction project got some encouraging news this week. 

MTA New York City Transit recently announced new details about the additional subway service that will run during the 15-month-long  tunnel reconstruction project, including more than 1,000 additional roundtrips per week across seven lines to accommodate  riders traveling between Brooklyn and Manhattan. 

“The  tunnel reconstruction project will be the most impactful Superstorm Sandy-repair work we will undertake and as such, we must ensure we have viable, reliable alternatives particularly on the subways where we can accommodate the largest number of riders,” said NYCT President Andy Byford. “We will be adding more than a thousand roundtrips each week and pushing our resources to capacity , which is also why you’re seeing so much preventative maintenance and repair work on all these lines already – we are making these lines as reliable as possible for these new service levels starting in 2019.” 

 NYC Transit expects to accommodate  riders through five of its 11 primary East River crossings, which will result in service additions on subway lines that use those tunnels or bridges as well as the G line, which connects Brooklyn riders to many cross-river lines. Altogether, NYC Transit will add 198 roundtrips each weekday and 94 weekend roundtrips on seven subway lines, pushing fleet, signal and track capacity to existing limits where feasible. This number includes the increased service on the 7 line which was previously announced in September 2018.  In order to help ensure these new levels of service are as reliable as possible, including  service which will run throughout all of Brooklyn during the reconstruction project, extensive preventative maintenance and repair work is happening on all of these lines this year, mostly during nights and weekends when ridership is at its lowest.

The alternate subway service changes during the  tunnel reconstruction project will be implemented in April 2019, along with the enhanced bus and ferry service as developed in close collaboration with NYCDOT and the New York City Economic Development Corporation. The subway service changes announced today are as follows:

L Trai Shutdown official weekday service

 

Wkkeknd L service pattern (offical)

 

Quote

ABOUT THE L TUNNEL RECONSTRUCTION PROJECT

The  tunnel – also known as the Canarsie Tunnel – was one of nine underwater tunnels that flooded during Superstorm Sandy in 2012, all of which required extensive rehabilitation and repair. The tunnel, which houses the under-river subway tracks for the line between Manhattan and Brooklyn, was flooded with enough water to fill 11 Olympic-sized swimming pools and suffered extensive damage to tracks, signals, switches, power cables, signal cables, communication cables, lighting, cable ducts and bench walls throughout a 7,100-foot-long flooded section of both tubes. Bench walls throughout those sections must be rehabilitated to protect the structural integrity of the tubes. While short-term repairs enabled NYC Transit to safely restore service after Sandy, long-term repairs are needed to run  service without major failures.

 NYC Transit began public outreach on the  tunnel reconstruction project in 2016, with more than 100 public workshops, neighborhood town halls and meetings with community boards, elected officials, the New York City Department of Transportation and the New York City Economic Development Corporation to plan the project and proposed service mitigation, and to solicit public feedback on how best to accommodate approximately 225,000 riders who currently take the  train between Manhattan and Brooklyn and the 50,000 riders who take the  in Manhattan.

The result of the extensive public outreach was a comprehensive package of temporary service alternatives that include:

Additional subway service on seven lines

Five new high-frequency Select Bus Service routes

A new peak-hour limited-stop bus route between Canarsie and Crown Heights

Increased service on existing bus routes that link  customers to alternative subway routes

A new ferry service between Williamsburg in Brooklyn and Stuyvesant Cove at East 20th Street and Avenue C in Manhattan

NYC Transit continues to solicit feedback and plans to make adjustments to the alternate service plans if needed.

In addition to rebuilding the  tunnel, NYC Transit also plans to make improvements at several  stations as well as other stations that will be used by  customers seeking alternative service.

Information on the Train Tunnel repairs, the alternate service changes and the station improvement projects are available at http://mta.info/LTunnelReconstruction.

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Ok, they're currently working on a new CBTC service pattern for Bedford Avenue so trains can terminate there. 

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Starting in January, Customers Can Expect Series of Open Houses, Pop-Up Events and Mobile Information Centers to Help Plan Routes Using New Alternate Transportation Options Ahead of April 27, 2019, Tunnel Closure

MTA New York City Transit (MTA NYC Transit) and the New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) today announced new details about what customers can expect ahead of April 2019 when the  train tunnel between Manhattan and Brooklyn is closed for 15 months for extensive repairs from Superstorm Sandy, with  service running in Brooklyn between the Bedford Av and Canarsie Rockaway Parkway Stations.

The  tunnel will close for its 15-month reconstruction on Saturday, April 27, 2019. This means that the last day for  service between 8th Av and Bedford Av in Brooklyn will be Friday, April 26, 2019.  train service will continue throughout Brooklyn, between the Bedford Av station, which will remain open during the tunnel closure, and the Canarsie-Rockaway Parkway station.

The alternative service options for customers, which includes five additional bus routes, a new M14 Select Bus Service on 14th Street and a ferry service, will begin on Sunday, April 21, 2019, to allow for customers to sample and become acclimated to new travel options. The additional subway service on other lines – more than 1,000 additional roundtrips – will begin on April 28, 2019, following the  tunnel closure. Read the full plan for temporary service options in support of the L tunnel reconstruction project.

http://www.mta.info/press-release/nyc-transit/mta-new-york-city-transit-nycdot-announce-new-schedule-details-l-tunnel

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It's also incredibly pointless as well. Regardless of what the EIS states, this shutdown and all that it entails will still go into effect this April. Too much of the plan has already been planned out and put into place, so any major changes to the plan to accommodate these opponents will likely be more disruptive than the existing plan put out by the MTA and DOT.

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3 hours ago, Lance said:

It's also incredibly pointless as well. Regardless of what the EIS states, this shutdown and all that it entails will still go into effect this April. Too much of the plan has already been planned out and put into place, so any major changes to the plan to accommodate these opponents will likely be more disruptive than the existing plan put out by the MTA and DOT.

I suspect this is really about their wanting the (L) to continue to operate in Manhattan between 1st and 8th Avenue during the tunnel shutdown.  I've noted before a plan to do that using eight, four-car sets with a maximum of three trains running at any one time (five spares as being able to swap out cars would be limited at best as has been noted here many times).  I suspect they likely think it will create traffic nightmares, especially from those coming from New Jersey who can't (or in many cases, won't) use public transportation (either because it is very difficult to get to NYC from where they are on Public Transportation or in some cases thinking such is "beneath them"), creating a much bigger problem in the eyes of those with this lawsuit.

Edited by Wallyhorse
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8 hours ago, Wallyhorse said:

I suspect this is really about their wanting the (L) to continue to operate in Manhattan between 1st and 8th Avenue during the tunnel shutdown.  I've noted before a plan to do that using eight, four-car sets with a maximum of three trains running at any one time (five spares as being able to swap out cars would be limited at best as has been noted here many times).  I suspect they likely think it will create traffic nightmares, especially from those coming from New Jersey who can't (or in many cases, won't) use public transportation (either because it is very difficult to get to NYC from where they are on Public Transportation or in some cases thinking such is "beneath them"), creating a much bigger problem in the eyes of those with this lawsuit.

I suspect this is not about that at all.

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It's not. They don't want to be bothered by the additional traffic the shutdown will cause (understandable) and are willing to throw as many lawsuits in front of this as possible in the hopes of delaying the project (not so much so).

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On 11/2/2018 at 10:57 AM, Lance said:

It's not. They don't want to be bothered by the additional traffic the shutdown will cause (understandable) and are willing to throw as many lawsuits in front of this as possible in the hopes of delaying the project (not so much so).

You're probably right, but I would think they would think having the (L) run between 1st and 8th Avenues only would have cut down on traffic on 14th street. 

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10 hours ago, Wallyhorse said:

You're probably right, but I would think they would think having the (L) run between 1st and 8th Avenues only would have cut down on traffic on 14th street. 

Yes, much as having trains run in the abandoned portion of the Atlantic Ave tunnel would cut down on traffic above.

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On 11/10/2018 at 12:43 AM, RR503 said:

Yes, much as having trains run in the abandoned portion of the Atlantic Ave tunnel would cut down on traffic above.

What I meant is, people who in that part of Manhattan who likely would not drive because they could still get the (L) on 14th Street (especially on the lower east side) as opposed to driving and adding to the traffic woes. 

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4 hours ago, Wallyhorse said:

What I meant is, people who in that part of Manhattan who likely would not drive because they could still get the (L) on 14th Street (especially on the lower east side) as opposed to driving and adding to the traffic woes. 

They'll have to use the L1, L2, L3, L4 and M14SBS as alternatives to get to other lines

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http://www.mta.info/press-release/nyc-transit/mta-nyc-transit-performing-accelerated-schedule-track-repairs-station

MTA New York City Transit is continuing its accelerated schedule of proactive weekend track maintenance and repairs, as well as station improvements, on the (J)(M)(Z)   lines this winter to ensure safe and reliable service when the (L)  train tunnel reconstruction begins in April 2019 and the (L) line operates as a Brooklyn-only service. 

“We’re working hard to be ready for when the (L) line runs as a Brooklyn-only service while we reconstruct its under-river tunnel next year,” said MTA NYC Transit President Andy Byford. “To make sure our alternate service will be as reliable possible before the project starts, we’re doing accelerated work now on those subway lines and stations that will absorb customers going to and from Manhattan.”

The (J)(M)(Z)  lines will be heavily used as alternate subway service during the (L) tunnel reconstruction, and NYC Transit is extremely focused on conducting as much repair and maintenance work as possible on those lines to limit any unplanned service outages when the (L) becomes a Brooklyn-only line. Additionally, NYC Transit is making capacity improvements at stations along the (J)(M)(Z)   lines, such as projects to widen stairs, turnstile areas or points of entrance/exit and transfer. A project to double capacity recently completed at Hewes St with a reopened staircase and more turnstiles.  To accelerate construction for station improvements at Marcy Av (J)(M)(Z)  and track work, crews will require total track or station access on select weekends in November and December.

 

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On 11/20/2018 at 7:50 PM, Union Tpke said:

http://www.mta.info/press-release/nyc-transit/mta-nyc-transit-performing-accelerated-schedule-track-repairs-station

MTA New York City Transit is continuing its accelerated schedule of proactive weekend track maintenance and repairs, as well as station improvements, on the (J)(M)(Z)   lines this winter to ensure safe and reliable service when the (L)  train tunnel reconstruction begins in April 2019 and the (L) line operates as a Brooklyn-only service. 

“We’re working hard to be ready for when the (L) line runs as a Brooklyn-only service while we reconstruct its under-river tunnel next year,” said MTA NYC Transit President Andy Byford. “To make sure our alternate service will be as reliable possible before the project starts, we’re doing accelerated work now on those subway lines and stations that will absorb customers going to and from Manhattan.”

The (J)(M)(Z)  lines will be heavily used as alternate subway service during the (L) tunnel reconstruction, and NYC Transit is extremely focused on conducting as much repair and maintenance work as possible on those lines to limit any unplanned service outages when the (L) becomes a Brooklyn-only line. Additionally, NYC Transit is making capacity improvements at stations along the (J)(M)(Z)   lines, such as projects to widen stairs, turnstile areas or points of entrance/exit and transfer. A project to double capacity recently completed at Hewes St with a reopened staircase and more turnstiles.  To accelerate construction for station improvements at Marcy Av (J)(M)(Z)  and track work, crews will require total track or station access on select weekends in November and December.

 

Excellent, but they should have also made all platforms at least as far as Broadway Junction 600 feet so the (M) could handle 10 cars.  That could have been part of a much longer-term project to get all Eastern Division platforms to 600 feet. 

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NYC is not ready for the (L) shutdown, nor will they ever be. There are too many construction projects getting done in the city to try to streamline traffic that is making it a nightmare to get around both in a car and on the subway. I think a re-evaluation of the shutdown should be done, to either cancel the shutdown (restricting work to overnights and weekends), or finding another way to do the reconstruction:

 

A diamond crossover should have been proposed east of 1 Av to allow the (L) to operate 7.5-minute headway’s into Manhattan (8 tph would be a lot better than 0). Then one tube would be reconstructed at a time. The (L) would run reduced service, but normal service between 8 Av and Canarsie. 

 

the extra subway service proposed would still be provided, and the shuttle buses would not be needed. 

 

Customers east of Myrtle Av would still be encouraged to take the (J)(M) trains. And those past Broadway Junction would be encouraged to take the (A)(C)

Even at reduced capacity, the (L) is needed.

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36 minutes ago, darkstar8983 said:

1) NYC is not ready for the (L) shutdown, nor will they ever be. There are too many construction projects getting done in the city to try to streamline traffic that is making it a nightmare to get around both in a car and on the subway. I think a re-evaluation of the shutdown should be done, to either cancel the shutdown (restricting work to overnights and weekends), or finding another way to do the reconstruction:

 

2) A diamond crossover should have been proposed east of 1 Av to allow the (L) to operate 7.5-minute headway’s into Manhattan (8 tph would be a lot better than 0). Then one tube would be reconstructed at a time. The (L) would run reduced service, but normal service between 8 Av and Canarsie. 

 

3) the extra subway service proposed would still be provided, and the shuttle buses would not be needed. 

 

4) Customers east of Myrtle Av would still be encouraged to take the (J)(M) trains. And those past Broadway Junction would be encouraged to take the (A)(C)

Even at reduced capacity, the (L) is needed.

1. You're right. But right now, the city and the (MTA) have no choice! Just shutting down Nights and Weekends to repair those tunnels won't suffice. (MTA) said that themselves (though I worded it differently). As for a re-evaluation of the Shutdown, it's too late for that. 

2.A full shutdown of both tubes was chosen in favor of this option because shutting down both tubes would only take 15 Months. As opposed to shutting down only one tube. Which would take 3 Years. 

3. The flaw with this is that the currently proposed shuttle buses cross the east river to connect with the (G)(J)(L)(M)(Z) . Your proposal with the (L) doesn't. 

4. ok. 

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36 minutes ago, darkstar8983 said:

NYC is not ready for the (L) shutdown, nor will they ever be. There are too many construction projects getting done in the city to try to streamline traffic that is making it a nightmare to get around both in a car and on the subway. I think a re-evaluation of the shutdown should be done, to either cancel the shutdown (restricting work to overnights and weekends), or finding another way to do the reconstruction:

 

A diamond crossover should have been proposed east of 1 Av to allow the (L) to operate 7.5-minute headway’s into Manhattan (8 tph would be a lot better than 0). Then one tube would be reconstructed at a time. The (L) would run reduced service, but normal service between 8 Av and Canarsie. 

 

the extra subway service proposed would still be provided, and the shuttle buses would not be needed. 

 

Customers east of Myrtle Av would still be encouraged to take the (J)(M) trains. And those past Broadway Junction would be encouraged to take the (A)(C)

Even at reduced capacity, the (L) is needed.

Yeah I think NYC is also not ready for the (L) shutdown but this is already planned out and finalized already. The MTA really can't cancel the shutdown at this point. New Yorkers would really have to deal with this either way. I know the first few weeks of the shutdown it is going to be crazy but i think after that point, it should be okay for people after adjusting to using alternative service routes for the first couple of weeks to get to their destination.

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54 minutes ago, darkstar8983 said:

A diamond crossover should have been proposed east of 1 Av to allow the (L) to operate 7.5-minute headway’s into Manhattan (8 tph would be a lot better than 0). Then one tube would be reconstructed at a time. The (L) would run reduced service, but normal service between 8 Av and Canarsie. 

 

the extra subway service proposed would still be provided, and the shuttle buses would not be needed. 

 

Customers east of Myrtle Av would still be encouraged to take the (J)(M) trains. And those past Broadway Junction would be encouraged to take the (A)(C)

Even at reduced capacity, the (L) is needed.

That would've been an enormous waste of time and money because this tunnel project will involve work trains and flatbed cars. There is no way that we can expect trains to run on two tracks in Manhattan while at the same time, accommodate those work trains. Those work trains will need to be parked on the line from 1st Avenue all the way to at most 6th Avenue, and running normal service, even at 8 minutes is not feasible, even with the switch. I am not willing to compromise passenger safety and a quicker completion for minimal inconvenience to you.

 

Even if they did one tunnel at a time, they would still need shuttle buses to get into Manhattan because Lorimer Street, Bedford Avenue and 1st Avenue would be super dangerous for anyone to board a train, especially when there is construction going on at 1st Avenue and Bedford Avenue. The (G) train Sandy-reconstruction project involved shuttle buses to get between Greenpoint and Long Island City for 5 weeks in 2014, and I didn't hear anyone complain about it (whether in Greenpoint, Williamsburg, or LIC).

 

This tunnel project is not like any other project. Williamsburg is NOT Downtown Brooklyn, and I say this because other than the (J)/(Z) and (M), there are no other alternatives to get across the East River compared to options in Downtown Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan. You can't shut down a tunnel (whether fully and partially) during weekdays and expect everyone to be accommodated by existing lines and a ferry alone, like what was done with the (R) train Montague Street Tunnel Reconstruction. The (L) carries 225,000 passengers across the river and not everyone can fit onto the other subways, nor they will tolerate the dust from the construction. Your idea of keeping service running in Manhattan with a stupid switch will do nothing but create a safety hazard for the riding public and make the work drag on longer. Deal with the full tunnel reconstruction with the shuttle buses and 14th Street busway, like what Greenpoint and Williamsburg had to endure during the (G) train project. Your whole plan is dead on arrival.

 

Carry on people!!!

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2 hours ago, JeremiahC99 said:

That would've been an enormous waste of time and money because this tunnel project will involve work trains and flatbed cars. There is no way that we can expect trains to run on two tracks in Manhattan while at the same time, accommodate those work trains. Those work trains will need to be parked on the line from 1st Avenue all the way to at most 6th Avenue, and running normal service, even at 8 minutes is not feasible, even with the switch. I am not willing to compromise passenger safety and a quicker completion for minimal inconvenience to you.

 

Even if they did one tunnel at a time, they would still need shuttle buses to get into Manhattan because Lorimer Street, Bedford Avenue and 1st Avenue would be super dangerous for anyone to board a train, especially when there is construction going on at 1st Avenue and Bedford Avenue. The (G) train Sandy-reconstruction project involved shuttle buses to get between Greenpoint and Long Island City for 5 weeks in 2014, and I didn't hear anyone complain about it (whether in Greenpoint, Williamsburg, or LIC).

 

This tunnel project is not like any other project. Williamsburg is NOT Downtown Brooklyn, and I say this because other than the (J)/(Z) and (M), there are no other alternatives to get across the East River compared to options in Downtown Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan. You can't shut down a tunnel (whether fully and partially) during weekdays and expect everyone to be accommodated by existing lines and a ferry alone, like what was done with the (R) train Montague Street Tunnel Reconstruction. The (L) carries 225,000 passengers across the river and not everyone can fit onto the other subways, nor they will tolerate the dust from the construction. Your idea of keeping service running in Manhattan with a stupid switch will do nothing but create a safety hazard for the riding public and make the work drag on longer. Deal with the full tunnel reconstruction with the shuttle buses and 14th Street busway, like what Greenpoint and Williamsburg had to endure during the (G) train project. Your whole plan is dead on arrival.

 

Carry on people!!!

1. The (G) shuttle buses were actually very reliable because of the lower ridership overall. People from Greenpoint Av could walk to/from Nassau Av and 21 St is in close proximity to Court Square. And it was during the summer.

2. This will open up a Pandora’s box because now the MTA will think that any tunnel can be closed in a similar manner full time and inconvenience hundreds of thousands a day. 

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13 minutes ago, darkstar8983 said:

This will open up a Pandora’s box because now the MTA will think that any tunnel can be closed in a similar manner full time and inconvenience hundreds of thousands a day. 

The only reason we are having this shutdown is because of sandy. And the other tunnels that were closed either had minimal impact and/or had alternatives. 

 

Outside of weekends and storms/natural disasters, there is no way you can close down tunnels like this.

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2 hours ago, darkstar8983 said:

1. The (G) shuttle buses were actually very reliable because of the lower ridership overall. People from Greenpoint Av could walk to/from Nassau Av and 21 St is in close proximity to Court Square. And it was during the summer.

2. This will open up a Pandora’s box because now the MTA will think that any tunnel can be closed in a similar manner full time and inconvenience hundreds of thousands a day. 

1.) I know those (G) shuttle buses were during the summer, but if those shuttle buses can work for connecting Greenpoint and LIC in place of train service, it certainly can work for connecting Williamsburg and Lower East Side.

 

2.) What are you talking about? As @MysteriousBtrain said, not every tunnel had damage similar to 14th Street-Canarsie Tunnel and the Montague Street Tunnel had. You can't automatically assume that every single subway tunnel damaged suffered severely, and its okay for the MTA to close tunnels 24/7 without considering impact and inconvenience. Are you suggesting that when the MTA repairs the Rutgers Street Tunnel, they should snarl already-jammed traffic in Downtown Brooklyn, DUMBO and Brooklyn Heights, and in the Lower East Side, while the (F) train goes over the (A) and (C) lines between Downtown Brooklyn and Manhattan.

And if you are wondering how these repairs were carried out, here was the answer (Note that weekend closures involved both tracks out of service, not one):

  1. Montague Street Tunnel (R) : Full Tunnel Closure for 14 months August 2013-October 2014 (completed 3 weeks early September 2014).
    1. No service between Court Street and Whitehall Street. Passengers accommodated on other lines
  2. Greenpoint Tunnel (G): Weekend closures in 2013, 5-week closure July 2014-September 2014.
    1. No service between Nassau Avenue and Long Island City. Passengers accommodated with shuttle buses.
  3. Steinway Tunnel (7) : Weekend closures
    1. No service into Manhattan. Passengers accomodated on other subway lines, with extra service on Astoria and 42nd Street.
  4. Joralemon Street Tunnel (4)(5) : Weekend Closures 2016.
    1. No trains into Brooklyn. Passengers accommodated on other lines. (3) extended into Brooklyn all weekend.
  5. Cranberry Street Tunnel (A)(C) : Weekend closures 2015-2016.
    1. Trains rerouted via Rutgers Street Tunnel. Passengers accommodated on other lines.
  6. 53rd Street Tunnel (E)(M) : Weekend Closures 2015-2016 (Note: this tunnel was closed again in December 2017 for unrelated work)
    1. Trains rerouted via 6th Avenue and 63rd Street. Passengers accommodated on other lines.
  7. Clark Street Tunnel (2)(3) : Weekend closures 2017-2018 (Note: This closure was incorporated into the June pick, and implemented for 56 weekends)
    1. No trains into Brooklyn. Passengers accommodated onto other lines. (4)(5) ran local in Brooklyn all weekend.
  8. 14th Street-Canarsie Tunnel (L): Full Tunnel closure April 2019-July 2020
    1. No trains into Manhattan. Passengers will be accommodated onto a variety of methods:
      1. Extra service on other subway lines
      2. Enhanced bus service on 14th Street, with 14th Street busway and M14 SBS.
      3. New SBS shuttle buses between Williamsburg and Subway Stops in Lower Manhattan via HOV 3+ Williamsburg Bridge
      4. New Ferry service.
  9. Rutgers Street Tunnel (F) : Next Tunnel to be repaired. Projected weekend closures
    1. Service possibly rerouted via Cranberry. Passengers accommodated onto other lines.

Notice how most of these closures have occurred on the weekends, and the next closure will possibly be a weekend work. This shows that each tunnel repair work required different approaches to doing the work depending on level of damage. The only time that all of these lines would've had a full closure was when all the listed tunnels suffered severe damage, which they didn't thank god. You're idea of saying that the MTA can close any tunnel 24/7 for repairs is absurd. What are you? A resident of the West Village?

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12 minutes ago, JeremiahC99 said:

1.) I know those (G) shuttle buses were during the summer, but if those shuttle buses can work for connecting Greenpoint and LIC in place of train service, it certainly can work for connecting Williamsburg and Lower East Side.

 

2.) What are you talking about? As @MysteriousBtrain said, not every tunnel had damage similar to 14th Street-Canarsie Tunnel and the Montague Street Tunnel had. You can't automatically assume that every single subway tunnel damaged suffered severely, and its okay for the MTA to close tunnels 24/7 without considering impact and inconvenience. Are you suggesting that when the MTA repairs the Rutgers Street Tunnel, they should snarl already-jammed traffic in Downtown Brooklyn, DUMBO and Brooklyn Heights, and in the Lower East Side, while the (F) train goes over the (A) and (C) lines between Downtown Brooklyn and Manhattan.

And if you are wondering how these repairs were carried out, here was the answer (Note that weekend closures involved both tracks out of service, not one):

  1. Montague Street Tunnel (R) : Full Tunnel Closure for 14 months August 2013-October 2014 (completed 3 weeks early September 2014).
    1. No service between Court Street and Whitehall Street. Passengers accommodated on other lines
  2. Greenpoint Tunnel (G): Weekend closures in 2013, 5-week closure July 2014-September 2014.
    1. No service between Nassau Avenue and Long Island City. Passengers accommodated with shuttle buses.
  3. Steinway Tunnel (7) : Weekend closures
    1. No service into Manhattan. Passengers accomodated on other subway lines, with extra service on Astoria and 42nd Street.
  4. Joralemon Street Tunnel (4)(5) : Weekend Closures 2016.
    1. No trains into Brooklyn. Passengers accommodated on other lines. (3) extended into Brooklyn all weekend.
  5. Cranberry Street Tunnel (A)(C) : Weekend closures 2015-2016.
    1. Trains rerouted via Rutgers Street Tunnel. Passengers accommodated on other lines.
  6. 53rd Street Tunnel (E)(M) : Weekend Closures 2015-2016 (Note: this tunnel was closed again in December 2017 for unrelated work)
    1. Trains rerouted via 6th Avenue and 63rd Street. Passengers accommodated on other lines.
  7. Clark Street Tunnel (2)(3) : Weekend closures 2017-2018 (Note: This closure was incorporated into the June pick, and implemented for 56 weekends)
    1. No trains into Brooklyn. Passengers accommodated onto other lines. (4)(5) ran local in Brooklyn all weekend.
  8. 14th Street-Canarsie Tunnel (L): Full Tunnel closure April 2019-July 2020
    1. No trains into Manhattan. Passengers will be accommodated onto a variety of methods:
      1. Extra service on other subway lines
      2. Enhanced bus service on 14th Street, with 14th Street busway and M14 SBS.
      3. New SBS shuttle buses between Williamsburg and Subway Stops in Lower Manhattan via HOV 3+ Williamsburg Bridge
      4. New Ferry service.
  9. Rutgers Street Tunnel (F) : Next Tunnel to be repaired. Projected weekend closures
    1. Service possibly rerouted via Cranberry. Passengers accommodated onto other lines.

Notice how most of these closures have occurred on the weekends, and the next closure will possibly be a weekend work. This shows that each tunnel repair work required different approaches to doing the work depending on level of damage. The only time that all of these lines would've had a full closure was when all the listed tunnels suffered severe damage, which they didn't thank god. You're idea of saying that the MTA can close any tunnel 24/7 for repairs is absurd. What are you? A resident of the West Village?

First of all, I don’t care for the way you’re criticizing me. Second, I am not from the east village. Or west village 

 

I’m only saying that the degree of invasiveness when it comes to repairs is increasing. And the city is unable to handle the capacity crush both on and off the rails.

 

Not every New Yorker is a hipster who rides a citibike or other equivalent bicycle. Uber/Lyft/via, etc. Is jamming up traffic along with people who drive because we cannot depend on mass transit because of the larger amount of work getting done. And this is a problem that goes beyond the MTA. We need to start coming up with better ideas on how to improve movement around and within NYC.

Edited by darkstar8983
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13 hours ago, darkstar8983 said:

First of all, I don’t care for the way you’re criticizing me. Second, I am not from the east village. Or west village 

 

I’m only saying that the degree of invasiveness when it comes to repairs is increasing. And the city is unable to handle the capacity crush both on and off the rails.

 

Not every New Yorker is a hipster who rides a citibike or other equivalent bicycle. Uber/Lyft/via, etc. Is jamming up traffic along with people who drive because we cannot depend on mass transit because of the larger amount of work getting done. And this is a problem that goes beyond the MTA. We need to start coming up with better ideas on how to improve movement around and within NYC.

That’s the purpose of the 14th Street Busway. It will help improve traffic movement in and around NYC while the (L) train Tunnel is safely repaired. Why would you suggest keeping one tunnel open, and install a useless diamond crossover just to continue (L) service into Manhattan? You’re just putting passengers in harms way and exposing them to the train construction. If the Fulton Street Busway didn’t screw traffic over in Downtown Brooklyn, then why do you think that a similar plan for 14th Street would destroy Union Square and the Villages?

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