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Great. Now there is another High Line-copier park plan that we have to fight; this time it is on SI.

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rk proposed for abandoned half-mile of Staten Island rail line

 
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Can a North Shore High Line work on Staten Island?

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10346524.pngBy Tracey Porpora | porpora@siadvance.com 

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on February 22, 2017 at 5:00 PM, updated February 22, 2017 at 7:51 PM

 
 
 

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- An abandoned half-mile stretch of rail line in Port Richmond could become parkland, much like Manhattan's High Line, if the Staten Island Economic Development Corp. gets its way.

The SIEDC announced Wednesday that it has launched a design competition to transform the unused rail right-of-way.

"Realizing we have this long abandoned North Shore Rail Line, I wanted to look into how we could replicate what they did in Manhattan," said Cesar Claro, SIEDC president and CEO.

 

"We met with Friends of the High Line in Manhattan ... and came up with a plan using the Manhattan High Line as the roadmap, and it will start with a design competition."

The proposed North Shore High Line will be .53 miles long from Richmond Terrace at Heberton Avenue in the east to Nicholas Avenue in the west. 

Claro said that some of the borough's worst illegal dumping takes place along the defunct rail line.

"On both sides, there is tons of garbage just dropped there. Plus, it's a blight on the community. Kids can get hurt climbing up there," Claro said.

$30 MILLON PRICE TAG

He hopes to tap into federal funding and work with local elected officials to fund the project, which he estimated would cost about $30 million.

Claro noted that such a project would take several years -- possibly two decades -- to complete.

"Keep in mind Manhattan's High Line took 20 years from idea to creation," he said.

POSITIVE IMPACT 

Salvatore Calcagno Jr., SIEDC's ambassador for the project, said a North Shore High Line Park would have the potential to positively impact the economy of the neighborhoods around it.

"The right-of-way of the abandoned North Shore railway in Port Richmond represents an unprecedented economic and recreational opportunity," he said.

"Based on the success of the High Line on the West Side of Manhattan, we believe that activating the dormant line in a similar fashion can be a transformative project for the area. We hope this leads to an active public space along the line," Calcagno added.

According to Calcagno, benefits of the project would include:

  • Activation of dormant space;
  • Beautification of the abandoned railway;
  • Creation of and access to much needed park space;
  • Encouragement for new businesses to open in the area;
  • Overall financial growth for the area;
  • Opportunities for safe biking and walking;
  • Educational tours and community engagement;
  • Launch of community benefit programs, including gardens and social programs.

According to a study conducted by Michael Levere, a PhD candidate in economics at UC San Diego, the Manhattan High Line had a tangible effect on the value of homes located within a third of a mile of it, leading to a 10 percent increase in housing prices. "If our high line is half as successful as Manhattan's, it will be a major boon to the community," said Calcagno.

DESIGN COMPETITION

The SIEDC design competition is open to planners, designers, engineers, architects and urbanists across the region. The SIEDC is even encouraging submissions from local residents. 

The proposals will need to include the following:

  • A point-of-view image of walking on the High Line (hand-drawn artwork -- colored pencils/markers -- or computer aided design);
  • An electronic and mounted version of the image on styrofoam or cardboard (30 inches high by 48 inches long);
  • A proposed name and logo for the project.

The proposals should be e-mailed to Steven Grillo, SIEDC's first vice president, at Steven@siedc.org and a mounted version delivered to SIEDC's office at 900 South Avenue, Suite 402, no later than Friday, April 7.

Point-of-view images submitted through the competition will be on display at the SIEDC's 18th annual Business Conference on April 27 in the Hilton Garden Inn, Bloomfield.

Votes from the public will be tallied and an announcement of the winning design and name will be announced at the SI Green Expo on June 8.

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The High Line is attractive because it is in Manhattan, and not far from everything else.

 

In terms of tourism, Port Richmond is the middle of nowhere. I sincerely doubt anybody would take a bus just to see this new "High Line" when the real one in Manhattan is only steps from everywhere.

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If they did this from the ferry down to the salt plant and built a light rail - like LA did with Phase 2 of the Expo line, it could be worth it, but I can't imagine anyone would take the S40 to go to a park - especially when the bulk of the view is industrial and port facilities.

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The line should be used for heavy rail. SIR trains should run to Arlington. Bus Rapid Transit would be better than nothing, and LRT would be OK, but HRT would make full use of the ROW and would provide service to some of the poorer areas of the borough, cutting down commute times. Other than this, the next project should be the extension of the HBLR to SI via the Bayonne Bridge and via the West Shore of SI. This would provide an additional connection to Manhattan, as well as connecting the borough to NJ.

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The segment in question from Heberton Av to Nicholas Av is literally just all houses. There's no commercial, no anything else within walking distance. Who the hell would want to go out to some random half-mile stub park in the boondocks?

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The segment in question from Heberton Av to Nicholas Av is literally just all houses. There's no commercial, no anything else within walking distance. Who the hell would want to go out to some random half-mile stub park in the boondocks?

The people that live in the boonies themselves?

 

If this was by the St. George area I'd be all for it, but this random area? I don't even live on SI and I say this doesn't make a lot of sense.

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The more I read about this, the more I realize how stupid an idea this is, even from a tourist trap standpoint. It's like they saw the moronic Queensway proposals and thought they could top it.

 

The segment in question from Heberton Av to Nicholas Av is literally just all houses. There's no commercial, no anything else within walking distance. Who the hell would want to go out to some random half-mile stub park in the boondocks?

I was thinking this was near the new developments in St. George. At least with the London Eye New York Eye Wheel and the Empire Outlets mall proposed to be in the area, there'd actually be some justification for this so-called High Line. Not much, since most people would probably just drive or take the ferry from Manhattan, but still something tangible. With this asinine proposal, way out in boondocks central, there's absolutely nothing to draw anyone in, that is unless they like the glorious views of residents' bedrooms and whatnot.

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This is what happens when the (MTA) takes forever to get anything thing done. What's up with the North Shore Busway? The study I believe was done in 2011 and now absolutely nothing happened yet other than study after study. Same goes with the Rockaway beach Line in Queens. The sooner the MTA gets started the sooner these insane proposal will stop.

The segment in question from Heberton Av to Nicholas Av is literally just all houses. There's no commercial, no anything else within walking distance. Who the hell would want to go out to some random half-mile stub park in the boondocks?

Should've seen port Richmond, it's like a abandoned town already.

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This is what happens when the (MTA) takes forever to get anything thing done. What's up with the North Shore Busway? The study I believe was done in 2011 and now absolutely nothing happened yet other than study after study. Same goes with the Rockaway beach Line in Queens. The sooner the MTA gets started the sooner these insane proposal will stop.

They do these endless studies because they really have no interest in actually taking on these projects. A study makes it look like they're doing something when in reality, it's yet another waste of everyone's time and money.

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Oh God another one of these idiotic proposals. It's like Wally's proposals, but 100% dumber and idiotic.

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The more I read about this, the more I realize how stupid an idea this is, even from a tourist trap standpoint. It's like they saw the moronic Queensway proposals and thought they could top it.

 

I was thinking this was near the new developments in St. George. At least with the London Eye New York Eye Wheel and the Empire Outlets mall proposed to be in the area, there'd actually be some justification for this so-called High Line. Not much, since most people would probably just drive or take the ferry from Manhattan, but still something tangible. With this asinine proposal, way out in boondocks central, there's absolutely nothing to draw anyone in, that is unless they like the glorious views of residents' bedrooms and whatnot.

Nah, they'd see drydocks and boat mechanic shops on the SI side and a recycling center on the other side of the kill.

 

I guess that's scenic. But I'm pretty sure folks who find that as scenic probably thought Beer for my Horses deserved an Oscar.

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The more I read about this, the more I realize how stupid an idea this is, even from a tourist trap standpoint. It's like they saw the moronic Queensway proposals and thought they could top it.

 

I was thinking this was near the new developments in St. George. At least with the London Eye New York Eye Wheel and the Empire Outlets mall proposed to be in the area, there'd actually be some justification for this so-called High Line. Not much, since most people would probably just drive or take the ferry from Manhattan, but still something tangible. With this asinine proposal, way out in boondocks central, there's absolutely nothing to draw anyone in, that is unless they like the glorious views of residents' bedrooms and whatnot.

What's interesting about the segment of the North Shore Line nearest St. George, is that it is being converted to a pseudo-tunnel by the Empire Outlets and New York Wheel developments. The track continues west of Ballpark station, in an open space under the platform being built for the Wheel. It is, essentially, a tunnel to nowhere since the North Shore Line track either ends under the platform or very slightly west of it.

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As a Staten Island resident, I think this plan is complete BS. There should be some type of transit on the ROW.

 

The segment in question from Heberton Av to Nicholas Av is literally just all houses. There's no commercial, no anything else within walking distance. Who the hell would want to go out to some random half-mile stub park in the boondocks?

 

Port Richmond Avenue itself has some commercial activity south of the train tracks (not sure if they would plan an entrance directly from Port Richmond Avenue or if residents would have to walk to Heberton to reach it)

 

.....there's absolutely nothing to draw anyone in, that is unless they like the glorious views of residents' bedrooms and whatnot.

 

 

and these people will use coded racism to exault their project

 

Not sure what you mean. The CB1 members in the area seemed to support the North Shore Busway (since it looks like heavy/light rail are no longer options). I don't think they'll support a park if it means it precludes transit on the ROW, but just to be sure, I'll send them an email.

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Not sure what you mean. The CB1 members in the area seemed to support the North Shore Busway (since it looks like heavy/light rail are no longer options). I don't think they'll support a park if it means it precludes transit on the ROW, but just to be sure, I'll send them an email.

 

im saying using coded racism against the busway  to exault the park 

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im saying using coded racism against the busway  to exault the park 

 

I'm not sure what you mean. Port Richmond is around 90% minority (especially the area around the North Shore Rail ROW. Further south is more diverse).

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I'm not sure what you mean. Port Richmond is around 90% minority (especially the area around the North Shore Rail ROW. Further south is more diverse).

 

You don't have to be white to think that transit riders are lesser than you. The community around RBB is largely Hispanic.

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You don't have to be white to think that transit riders are lesser than you. The community around RBB is largely Hispanic.

 

The Hispanic people want the RBB. Its the white residents and their white councilwoman near the LIRR Main Line that are opposed.

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You don't have to be white to think that transit riders are lesser than you. The community around RBB is largely Hispanic.

 

I mean, he said "coded racism" which implies something against minorities.

 

In any case, I know people on the community board area committee, and they seem to be in favor of better transit. 

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im saying the an example of coded racism is that the park supporters will use coded racism such as "crime" or "people not of our kind" to stop the transit project 

like what the RBB opposition is engaged in.

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You have to learn how to crawl before you start running....

 

The north shore isn't close to being gentrified, and already we're talking about overhead parks & wanting to mirror the successes of Manhattan's High Line....

 

Basically, my response to this (plan) is...

Slow your roll.

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Maybe I should move there before they do build this rail or rapid bus link to the ferry. I’m willing to take the risk. Staten Island is like one of the last frontiers of New York City to be built up. Most of Queens and Brooklyn is already in the process of being overdeveloped.

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Maybe I should move there before they do build this rail or rapid bus link to the ferry. I’m willing to take the risk. Staten Island is like one of the last frontiers of New York City to be built up. Most of Queens and Brooklyn is already in the process of being overdeveloped.

My rent over here by Curtis High has gone up $200 since 2015. Better move fast since that outlet mall and wheel is already making this whole north shore area more expensive.

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Wow, just wow. This is shaping up to be one extraordinarily ineffective and unwise plan. Compared to this park plan, the most ridiculous proposals in the "Subway Proposals" thread sound tame.

 

Reasons why this won't work:

  1. 1- The area is mostly a low-density residential area. The High Line and QueensWay are both near more densely populated areas. Central Queens has a quarter-million people even though the areas nearby are mostly one- and two-story houses. Meanwhile, the Chelsea area is one of New York City's most gentrified neighborhoods now.
  2. 2- It isn't close to an area that will be redeveloped anytime soon, or rather, anything that looks lucrative. Even the QueensWay is near subway stations at several points, making it convenient to travel to the neighborhoods nearby. (On another note I hope the QueensWay is never built, either. We already have so many parks that we don't need another one that goes to nowhere, when a subway or LIRR extension can do so much more for the average commuter. The High Line was good because it was in a place that was considered the boondocks, but now is very close to the (7) and the rest of the city.)
  3. 3- This area has poor transit connections to the rest of the city. Granted, so did the High Line in Chelsea, but the High Line was at the very least only two blocks from the (A)(C)(E) even when it opened. On the other hand, this park will be, at most, lightly trafficked. It might be good as a running path, but that's about it.

If there was an EIS process for parks, this would be denied.

Edited by agar io
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