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Union Tpke

NYC Subway Ridership 2016 finally in: Hudson Yards in at 189th.

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It was a month late, but the MTA has finally put out its ridership numbers.

As expected, there were massive changes in ridership on the New Lots, Culver, and Sea Beach Line due to service changes.

http://web.mta.info/nyct/facts/ridership/ridership_sub_annual.htm

Hudson Yards is 189th ridership.

 

Broad Street is up yet again, spurred by increased weekend ridership, which is largely being taken away from Wall Street on the 4 and 5. It is now 241st in ridership.

 

Cortlandt Street had a big jump, increasing by 1.5 million, or 57% to 116th in ridership.

Fulton Street is still on the rise, increasing by 3.5 million, or 16.1% to 7th in ridership.

 

Queensboro Plaza is up by 8.8 percent to 4.1 million.

Edited by Union Tpke
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The Cortlandt/Fulton increases are just PATH/Fulton Center, right?

 

The increases to Lower Manhattan/East Midtown versus "conventional" Midtown stations is also definitely very interesting. Also LIC.

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I found it very interesting how most of the  (J)  (Z) stations in Manhattan increased...

 

Broad St +12.5%

Fulton St +16.1%

Chambers St -4.0%

Canal St +1.2%

Bowery +3.3%

Essex St +2.8%

 

The 2017 stats for Hudson Yards  (7) will be really interesting, as there's been quite a peak in usage on weekends and during events at the Javits Center. 

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I found it very interesting how most of the  (J)  (Z) stations in Manhattan increased...

 

Broad St +12.5%

Fulton St +16.1%

Chambers St -4.0%

Canal St +1.2%

Bowery +3.3%

Essex St +2.8%

 

The 2017 stats for Hudson Yards  (7) will be really interesting, as there's been quite a peak in usage on weekends and during events at the Javits Center. 

 

The 2017 stats in general will be very interesting. I'm curious to see how many riders the 2nd Avenue subway stole from the Lex. I expect the MTA to release the 2017 stats early next year.

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It will also be interesting to see whether weekend ridership continues to go down. There really should be posters listing service changes several months in advance like the Fastrack posters. We, the users of NYCTF, know about them as we look several months advance for changes we would like to fan, but the general public doesn't do that. If riders knew about service changes, then they would plan around them, and would use the subway instead of using cars. I know that some people will never check service change info, but I think that there is a sizable group that would look for them. One more thing: I wonder what the ridership numbers would be if there was no farebeating? 

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It will also be interesting to see whether weekend ridership continues to go down. There really should be posters listing service changes several months in advance like the Fastrack posters. We, the users of NYCTF, know about them as we look several months advance for changes we would like to fan, but the general public doesn't do that. If riders knew about service changes, then they would plan around them, and would use the subway instead of using cars. I know that some people will never check service change info, but I think that there is a sizable group that would look for them. One more thing: I wonder what the ridership numbers would be if there was no farebeating? 

 

No one will read them.

 

The posters need to be redesigned to be more visual, instead of just large paragraphs of text, so that people will be more likely to read and understand them.

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It will also be interesting to see whether weekend ridership continues to go down. There really should be posters listing service changes several months in advance like the Fastrack posters. We, the users of NYCTF, know about them as we look several months advance for changes we would like to fan, but the general public doesn't do that. If riders knew about service changes, then they would plan around them, and would use the subway instead of using cars. I know that some people will never check service change info, but I think that there is a sizable group that would look for them. One more thing: I wonder what the ridership numbers would be if there was no farebeating?

 

I'll tell you how I plan around the subway... I don't use it unless necessary and even then I check the (MTA) page for status updates.

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Also when there aren't G.O.'s headways are way too high on most lines. I'm sick and tired of boarding crushloaded subway cars on weekends when there should be more than enough service out there to satisfy the demand. Most cars shouldn't even be SRO including when they go through Midtown. 

 

I'm not shocked Lower Manhattan and LIC are seeing higher numbers since Midtown is already peaked out as a job center and jobs are starting to grow in other areas. You've seen lots of space open up with the WTC construction and LIC is seeing an explosion in high rise activity. 

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When looking at Lower Manhattan, don't forget the Joralemon and Cranberry GO's.

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It will also be interesting to see whether weekend ridership continues to go down. There really should be posters listing service changes several months in advance like the Fastrack posters. We, the users of NYCTF, know about them as we look several months advance for changes we would like to fan, but the general public doesn't do that. If riders knew about service changes, then they would plan around them, and would use the subway instead of using cars. I know that some people will never check service change info, but I think that there is a sizable group that would look for them.

I look out for service changes all the time. But when you have constant GO's that say things like "Trains run every 16 minutes between xxx and yyy" along with "Trains run local in both driections" and also "No service between yyy and zzz", it doesn't really encourage (for example) anyone who actually lives here to take the subway on the weekends, much less a confused tourist.

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No one will read them.

 

The posters need to be redesigned to be more visual, instead of just large paragraphs of text, so that people will be more likely to read and understand them.

Agreed. I've said it time and again, but it bears repeating. The MTA needs to put out maps of the service changes, at least the planned ones for the weekends and late nights. And no, their blinking dots Weekender doesn't count. The On the Go kiosks throughout the subway give the MTA a prime opportunity to give a visual representation of the service changes. Too bad they obviously have no interest in using the technology to its fullest potential. Or anything resembling useful.

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...The MTA needs to put out maps of the service changes, at least the planned ones for the weekends and late nights. And no, their blinking dots Weekender doesn't count...

If this guy can do it weekly, surely (MTA) could.

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That is Lance's work. I was wondering if someone would post that. Read his signature.

Things you learn because signatures don't show up in Safari mobile.

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Re... our discussion about planned service changes

 

What about something as simple as a closure calendar and some better website design?

 

TfL's website has the standard options for current changes, next weekend's changes, a future date, planned service changes calendar and a 'six months look ahead" PDF which lists all the track closures in the next six months. Its directly below the service changes widget. (http://content.tfl.gov.uk/track-closures.pdf)

35123300306_7c58165995_b.jpg

Then there is the planned service changes calendar. If you click one of the colored boxes it gives you info on what the change is.

35163375725_4b39180ba5_o.png

And when you click on a particular service change in the status updates main page, the map on the right hand side highlights the area effected:

34353406373_d4c19e14d3_b.jpg


Agreed. I've said it time and again, but it bears repeating. The MTA needs to put out maps of the service changes, at least the planned ones for the weekends and late nights. And no, their blinking dots Weekender doesn't count. The On the Go kiosks throughout the subway give the MTA a prime opportunity to give a visual representation of the service changes. Too bad they obviously have no interest in using the technology to its fullest potential. Or anything resembling useful.

I'd like to see more of the Planned Service Changes posters include maps, not just the major changes.

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Yeah, any sort of poster for service changes should be quick and to the point, with as little text as possible. If I'm a commuter in a rush the last thing i want to do is decipher a paragraph of word vomit and MTA jargon.

 

RER-C-summer-2016-closures1.jpg

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Re... our discussion about planned service changes

 

What about something as simple as a closure calendar and some better website design?

 

TfL's website has the standard options for current changes, next weekend's changes, a future date, planned service changes calendar and a 'six months look ahead" PDF which lists all the track closures in the next six months. Its directly below the service changes widget. (http://content.tfl.gov.uk/track-closures.pdf)

 

Then there is the planned service changes calendar. If you click one of the colored boxes it gives you info on what the change is.

 

And when you click on a particular service change in the status updates main page, the map on the right hand side highlights the area effected:

<pics removed>

Something like that. When the MTA unveiled the Weekender in 2011 or so, that's what I thought they were going to do, utilizing the diagrammatic map for easier coding methods.

 

Yeah, any sort of poster for service changes should be quick and to the point, with as little text as possible. If I'm a commuter in a rush the last thing i want to do is decipher a paragraph of word vomit and MTA jargon.

 

<pic removed>

Agreed. Most riders, myself included, just want to know what's running, what's not, and how to avoid the mess. I've been making these maps for over five years and I sometimes have problems figuring out what the MTA is doing. You can only imagine the hapless tourist trying to figure that out.

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