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More overnight service shutdown


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https://ny.curbed.com/2017/7/31/16068078/nyc-subway-repairs-fastrack-mta

http://nypost.com/2017/07/30/subways-may-shut-down-more-overnight-for-repairs/

 

What means that ?

 

1) Does mean it more consecutive days of fastrack ( 7 consecutive days of the late night shutdown on a section of a line instead of 5 or even 15 - 30 consecutive days ) ? Does mean fastrack on more lines in the same moment ?

 

2) I think that no line will be totally closed, but only segments of a line ? Is it right ?

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https://ny.curbed.com/2017/7/31/16068078/nyc-subway-repairs-fastrack-mta

http://nypost.com/2017/07/30/subways-may-shut-down-more-overnight-for-repairs/

 

What means that ?

 

1) Does mean it more consecutive days of fastrack ( 7 consecutive days of the late night shutdown on a section of a line instead of 5 or even 15 - 30 consecutive days ) ? Does mean fastrack on more lines in the same moment ?

 

2) I think that no line will be totally closed, but only segments of a line ? Is it right ?

It means more shutdowns over night, so yes, more Fastrak. It may not be consecutive days though, but it will be more frequent for sure.

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I hate to say this i hope no one proposes that shutdown which will reduces the subway's hours

 

Thankfully no chance. Lhota noted : “The last thing I want to do is take away from New Yorkers something they’ve enjoyed, which is 24 hour a day service.”

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Do you mean a section of a line ? I don't think a entire line....

Yeah I mean like the QB line or something. For example, shutting it down to install CBTC asap. Not the entire line at once, but like in a Fastrack way. (Segments between Express stations,etc)

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Yeah I mean like the QB line or something. For example, shutting it down to install CBTC asap. Not the entire line at once, but like in a Fastrack way. (Segments between Express stations,etc)

QBL has four tracks. 40 minutes to midtown on the local. People in the Bx and the bottom of Bk have commutes just as long. Why not shut down the express tracks for a month, short turn (M)(R) and put in CBTC, then do the same with the local tracks, and be done with it?

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QBL has four tracks. 40 minutes to midtown on the local. People in the Bx and the bottom of Bk have commutes just as long. Why not shut down the express tracks for a month, short turn (M)(R) and put in CBTC, then do the same with the local tracks, and be done with it?

I agree. Lines like the Brighton line rarely see express service these days.
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I agree. Lines like the Brighton line rarely see express service these days.

They already do long term shutdowns on the Brooklyn lines to do station rehabs, why not do the same - one track in each direction to modernize signals and trackways?

 

Some straphangers might be vocal, but everyone will adapt and deal with it and be happier when it's done since it could be done relatively quickly.

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They already do long term shutdowns on the Brooklyn lines to do station rehabs, why not do the same - one track in each direction to modernize signals and trackways?

 

Some straphangers might be vocal, but everyone will adapt and deal with it and be happier when it's done since it could be done relatively quickly.

I've always favored longer shutdowns, not only for the reasons you mentioned, but because you don't have this piecemeal nonsense.  

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QBL has four tracks. 40 minutes to midtown on the local. People in the Bx and the bottom of Bk have commutes just as long. Why not shut down the express tracks for a month, short turn (M)(R) and put in CBTC, then do the same with the local tracks, and be done with it?

 

Yeah, no. Those lines don't have the same passenger volume as QBL. Running the (E)(F) as the only services on Queens Blvd during rush hour would be an absolute disaster...

 

As it is currently, all four lines on QBL are crush loaded. Try forcing all of them onto only two lines and you'll see the mess you've created.

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Yeah, no. Those lines don't have the same passenger volume as QBL. Running the (E)(F) as the only services on Queens Blvd during rush hour would be an absolute disaster...

 

As it is currently, all four lines on QBL are crush loaded. Try forcing all of them onto only two lines and you'll see the mess you've created.

Close or restrict the transfer point at 74 Street, from the (7) a lot of the crowds will be gone. The trains usually get full at Roosevelt Avenue. Not much alternatives in Queens but if it gotta be done, it gotta be done fast, and shut down two track at a time is the only way to do it. No more of the anything but rush hour service changes.
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Close or restrict the transfer point at 74 Street, from the (7) a lot of the crowds will be gone. The trains usually get full at Roosevelt Avenue. Not much alternatives in Queens but if it gotta be done, it gotta be done fast, and shut down two track at a time is the only way to do it. No more of the anything but rush hour service changes.

 

Not really. (E) and (F) are SRO by the time you get to Kew Gardens.

 

If anyone suggested that we should just shut down Lexington Avenue Line services for a month, people would throw a fit, but Queens doesn't matter even though QBL is the second busiest trunk line in the system. Queens already lacks subway services as it is compared to the other populous boroughs, and there aren't that many crossings into Manhattan as it is.

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QBL has four tracks. 40 minutes to midtown on the local. People in the Bx and the bottom of Bk have commutes just as long. Why not shut down the express tracks for a month, short turn (M)(R) and put in CBTC, then do the same with the local tracks, and be done with it?

 

People making the commute from Kew Gardens and Jamaica won't like the idea of the (E)(F) running local all the way to into Manhattan. They can barely tolerate the delays during rush hours due to congestion between Queens Plaza and 71st-Continental, or the idea of the (E)(F) and (R) sharing the same track between that same section due to construction on the QBL.

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People making the commute from Kew Gardens and Jamaica won't like the idea of the (E)(F) running local all the way to into Manhattan. They can barely tolerate the delays during rush hours due to congestion between Queens Plaza and 71st-Continental, or the idea of the (E)(F) and (R) sharing the same track between that same section due to construction on the QBL.

So to avoid pissing people off for a year, piss people off for five years or longer, even though a year of inconvenience would give them added service and better reliability??

 

What hurts more and longer: ripping the bandaid off or slowly peeling it off?

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So to avoid pissing people off for a year, piss people off for five years or longer, even though a year of inconvenience would give them added service and better reliability??

 

What hurts more and longer: ripping the bandaid off or slowly peeling it off?

 

These people are already inconvenienced by the delays and lack of options into Manhattan on daily basis. The issue with shutting down two of the four tracks on the QBL for maintenance is that there's no alternative to the (E)(F) between Manhattan, Roosevelt Avenue, and Jamaica during construction.

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These people are already inconvenienced by the delays and lack of options into Manhattan on daily basis. The issue with shutting down two of the four tracks on the QBL for maintenance is that there's no alternative to the (E)(F) between Manhattan, Roosevelt Avenue, and Jamaica during construction.

 

So do it one track at a time with peak reversible express service on one track.

 

Ex: if the Manhattan local is closed, use the Manhattan express track for local service with platform bridges (like LIRR, MNRR and NJT use) until it's open again. Then use the Queens Express track for peak express, and so on.

 

Ain't that hard. Inconvenient, but not that hard.

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So do it one track at a time with peak reversible express service on one track.

 

Ex: if the Manhattan local is closed, use the Manhattan express track for local service with platform bridges (like LIRR, MNRR and NJT use) until it's open again. Then use the Queens Express track for peak express, and so on.

 

 

I don't think that is possible since you have walls dividing the local and express tracks

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Now I understand the lack of options Queens rider have. I commute from Queens. But to deal with signal problem after signal problems every other week, I would favor a lengthy shut down, to bite the bullet and let our empolyer know the train is gonna be shut down instead of unplanned disruptions. Now we could allow cross honoring, more bus service/bus lanes, Express Bus Service, or shuttle bus from other stations such as Metropolitan Av to select QBL stations on top of existing and reduced local service. Will it be painful yes, but aleast the employer will know it ahead of time, and when it opens hopefully there will be less unplanned delays.

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Not really. (E) and (F) are SRO by the time you get to Kew Gardens.

 

If anyone suggested that we should just shut down Lexington Avenue Line services for a month, people would throw a fit, but Queens doesn't matter even though QBL is the second busiest trunk line in the system. Queens already lacks subway services as it is compared to the other populous boroughs, and there aren't that many crossings into Manhattan as it is.

Sorry if this comes off as a silly question, but when you say busy are you going by overall ridership or just how packed the trains get? I thought the 7th avenue line was the busiest since it's right behind the Lex at 1.1m for weekday ridership and it serves some of the busiest stations in the system such as Penn Station, columbus circle, and times square.

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Sorry if this comes off as a silly question, but when you say busy are you going by overall ridership or just how packed the trains get? I thought the 7th avenue line was the busiest since it's right behind the Lex at 1.1m for weekday ridership and it serves some of the busiest stations in the system such as Penn Station, columbus circle, and times square.

The (E) and the (F) are quite busy.  You have to remember that the Lex line and the 7th Avenue line use smaller cars.  The (E) and (F) by comparison use bigger cars.  

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