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Via Garibaldi 8

MTA driver critically injured while trying to stop bus from rolling backward in Queens

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MTA driver critically injured while trying to stop bus from rolling backward in Queens

 

 

article-bus-0829.jpg                A city bus driver trying to stop his bus from rolling backward into a cemetery sustained several serious injuries on Tuesday.
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Updated: Tuesday, August 29, 2017, 10:08 AM
 

A city bus driver was hospitalized with critical injuries early Tuesday when he tried to stop his bus from rolling backward into a Queens cemetery, police said.

 

The bus driver parked and stepped away from his bus outside All Faiths Cemetery on Metropolitan Ave. near 65th Place in Ridgewood about 1:20 a.m., police said.

 

He was on his way to a bathroom break when the bus began rolling backward, authorities said.

 

As the bus careened across Metropolitan Ave. toward the cemetery gates, the panicked bus driver tried to slow the 42,500-pound vehicle by jumping onto the side and getting the passenger door open.

 

As he frantically tried to get the doors open, he was crushed against a pole the bus rolled past.

 

A second bus driver raced up to the bus and managed to hit the emergency brake, bringing the bus to a stop.

 

"(This bus driver) may have saved his life," said J.P. Patafio, vice president of bus operators for TWU Local 100.

 

"Nobody else was around to see what had happened. I'm not an expert, but in my opinion, this bus operator may have saved his colleague’s life. He could have been dead."

 

The wounded bus operator fell to the ground after getting crushed by the pole.

 

Medics rushed him to Elmhurst Hospital with a broken right arm, broken leg, a punctured lung and serious facial injuries, officials said.

 

The bus ultimately hit the cemetery’s wrought iron fence, officials said. The bus was not carrying passengers.

 

Cops and the MTA were investigating how the bus ended up rolling backwards down the street.

 

This is the second time in two months that a bus driver had to chase after their runaway bus.

 

On June 21, a Q58 bus parked on Palmetto St. in Bushwick rolled backwards down the street until it struck St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church on Knickerbocker Ave., police said.

 

The bus driver who chased the wayward bus had only been working for the MTA for three days, officials said.

 

A pedestrian changing his tire on the street was clipped during the June accident, but not seriously injured.

That mishap happened about four miles from Tuesday’s crash, officials said.

 

Source: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/queens/mta-driver-stop-bus-rolling-breaks-arm-article-1.3451494

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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Damn. I hope for his sake there was a mechanical problem with the brakes.

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Looks like 4575 from Flatbush that got caught in the accident. I pray that this driver makes a full recovery. I'm guessing the driver was doing the (M) shuttle when the incident happen.

Edited by Future ENY OP

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Two in two months; both Orion VII's.

 

Methinks that that driver from last month may be getting her job back soon - two of the same incidents say that either DCX Buses/New Flyer or (MTA) mechanics may have made/repaired transmissions wrong.

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Two in two months; both Orion VII's.

 

Methinks that that driver from last month may be getting her job back soon - two of the same incidents say that either DCX Buses/New Flyer or (MTA) mechanics may have made/repaired transmissions wrong.

 

Or the two drivers were on unfamiliar routes, on unfamiliar equipment, late at night, tired, whatever, and both made a similar mistake. 

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Yes this is so sad. The incident occurred out of my depot and at the moment hes in critical condition and not conscious.

 

On the New flyers, the minute you remove your safety belt and the parking brake are not engage, an alarm starts to beep until you pull the brakes or fasten your seatbelt. I believe they should add that future onto all of the buses as a reminder that the parking brakes are not engaged.

 

 

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Two in two months; both Orion VII's.

 

Methinks that that driver from last month may be getting her job back soon - two of the same incidents say that either DCX Buses/New Flyer or (MTA) mechanics may have made/repaired transmissions wrong.

Turns out this guy didn't secure the brakes properly after discharging passengers from the bus.  I've attached a link from CBS:

 

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2017/08/29/mta-bus-rolls-into-queens-cemetery/

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Turns out this guy didn't secure the brakes properly after discharging passengers from the bus. I've attached a link from CBS:

 

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2017/08/29/mta-bus-rolls-into-queens-cemetery/

Even still, if this guy has 12 years on the job, he's driven Orion V, VI, VII likely without incident. Meaning brake securement is likely something he does passively - like how stickshift drivers always put e-brakes on in cars with auto trannys.

 

We can account for "mistakes happen" or "people get sloppy", but for this to happen to a new driver (who got her job back) and a 12 year vet, brake securement sounds too convenient. Especially after all the failures and safety issues (MTA) had of late.

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Even still, if this guy has 12 years on the job, he's driven Orion V, VI, VII likely without incident. Meaning brake securement is likely something he does passively - like how stickshift drivers always put e-brakes on in cars with auto trannys.

 

We can account for "mistakes happen" or "people get sloppy", but for this to happen to a new driver (who got her job back) and a 12 year vet, brake securement sounds too convenient. Especially after all the failures and safety issues (MTA) had of late.

When did this happen?

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Even still, if this guy has 12 years on the job, he's driven Orion V, VI, VII likely without incident. Meaning brake securement is likely something he does passively - like how stickshift drivers always put e-brakes on in cars with auto trannys.

 

We can account for "mistakes happen" or "people get sloppy", but for this to happen to a new driver (who got her job back) and a 12 year vet, brake securement sounds too convenient. Especially after all the failures and safety issues (MTA) had of late.

For all we know, this happens often, but B/O's catch the mistake before anyone notices, or they happen to be on level ground.

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When did this happen?

It's at the bottom of the CBS story you sent. She's on a 1-yr probationary contract.

For all we know, this happens often, but B/O's catch the mistake before anyone notices, or they happen to be on level ground.

Which says it could be a material defect for Orions, or a transmission maintenance issue with (MTA) garages.

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Wish a speed recovery for the operator, heard he isnt doing so well.

 

As an BO myself, I really dont understand the reasoning of turning off the bus from outside. It doesn't make sense to me, its common sense to turn it off from the seat IMO. Had he turn it off from the inside, he would've heard the buzzing and applied the ICC accordingly.

 

The other incident with the new operator, she had turned off the bus from the outside as well. We were never taught that in training. I just dont't get it.

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why do these buses not have emergency brake chokes?

 

Even if buses have those, there's no point in using them while parked on a shuttle bus line since you're constantly creeping up to the to stop or its a really quick layover at night, like this case.

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Even if buses have those, there's no point in using them while parked on a shuttle bus line since you're constantly creeping up to the to stop or its a really quick layover at night, like this case.

The M shuttle were setup just like an original bus route schedule. The operator had about 10 to 15 layover or less depending on the day and time.

 

 

 

 

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Wish a speed recovery for the operator, heard he isnt doing so well.

 

As an BO myself, I really dont understand the reasoning of turning off the bus from outside. It doesn't make sense to me, its common sense to turn it off from the seat IMO. Had he turn it off from the inside, he would've heard the buzzing and applied the ICC accordingly.

 

The other incident with the new operator, she had turned off the bus from the outside as well. We were never taught that in training. I just dont't get it.

I didn't know you could turn off a bus from the outside. That seems like a dumb feature.

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Most operator turn the bus off from outside as another way to secure the bus from anyone entering through the front door. Once the engine cuts off the front door air shuts tight, But again the parking brake must be engage the minute you are about to get out of the seat.

 

But from the way it looks like, its best to just pull the brakes as soon you reach the last stop and double check by yanking the parking brake before leaving the bus. I always take extra measure by kneeling the bus as well

 

 

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Most operator turn the bus off from outside as another way to secure the bus from anyone entering through the front door. Once the engine cuts off the front door air shuts tight, But again the parking brake must be engage the minute you are about to get out of the seat.

 

But from the way it looks like, its best to just pull the brakes as soon you reach the last stop and double check by yanking the parking brake before leaving the bus. I always take extra measure by kneeling the bus as well

 

 

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The MTA way is to turn the bus off from the inside. I barely see any operators turn the bus off from the inside. The air valve next to the driver seat is what controls it.

 

I understand the method your saying, but the bus operator would have to turn the air valve to get back in via the front window anyways.

 

Most operators turn the engine off first, after applying the parking brake. Then release the air of the front door via the valve. Exit the bus, and to put the air back into the door, they would have to go around the front to the driver window and put the air back in by sticking their hand within the window.

Edited by Statty

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Time to dump the Orion VII??

For what? They don't make that model anymore and the ones in service can't just be scrapped since there's already a shortage as it is.  These buses have been around for about a decade and I don't see them as the problem.  Drivers should be receiving training for far longer than they are.  Training costs money, but quite frankly I think it would help the (MTA) with higher retention in the long term, thus off-setting those costs substantially.  

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Time to dump the Orion VII??

No. It's probably in need of the bus equivalent of a TSB and a fix/workaround/idiot proofing for the parking brake failure/fault/operation procedure, but not a retirement - even though it's an ugly bus model compared to the Flxible New Look:

 

5483387559_09034a6711.jpg

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It's not time to scrap these, they have a long way to go... they should be getting rid of some of these careless and dumb operators they have that keep forgetting the most important part of parking a bus, which is pulling the parking brake. That should be the first thing every operator should do when parking a bus.

 

 

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Even if buses have those, there's no point in using them while parked on a shuttle bus line since you're constantly creeping up to the to stop or its a really quick layover at night, like this case.

Can't they turn the wheels into the curb?

 

Even better? Could the DOT consider tire width notches on hilly roads so that vehicles can anchor themselves?

 

Imagine driving into a ditch, except on purpose and to not total your vehicle. Like a roadway dog-ear.

For what? They don't make that model anymore and the ones in service can't just be scrapped since there's already a shortage as it is.  These buses have been around for about a decade and I don't see them as the problem.  Drivers should be receiving training for far longer than they are.  Training costs money, but quite frankly I think it would help the (MTA) with higher retention in the long term, thus off-setting those costs substantially.  

besides, we're taking in hand me downs as you say that, from Toronto.

 

Apparently that rarity has an appeal.

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