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Via Garibaldi 8

City Workers on Track to Set a Record for Being Late to Work Due to Train Delays

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Transit woes cost city 17k hours in lost worker time through 2017

 

 

mta30n-4-web.jpg Seemingly constant delays have plagued the city’s aging mass transit system through 2017.  (RICHARD HARBUS/FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Wednesday, August 30, 2017, 5:00 AM
 

City workers have been getting clocked by the MTA’s crumbling subway system and are on track to set a record for being late to their jobs because of service disruptions.

 

So far this year, city employees have missed 17,143 hours of work due to transit delays, according to an analysis by the Independent Budget Office. That puts city workers on pace to miss nearly 26,000 hours of work for the year — a nearly 30% increase from previous years.

 

Workers missed 19,417 hours due to transit delays in all of 2016. In 2015, subway headaches were blamed for 19,142 missed hours, up 5% from 18,191 in 2014.

 

“That shows very clearly that this is a problem that has been getting worse,” said Nick Sifuentes, deputy director of transit advocacy group Riders Alliance. “It went from being a slow-burn crisis to an emergency.”

 

The Daily News asked the IBO last week to crunch the numbers.

 

The IBO analysis showed that nearly all the dates with the most missed hours of work due to a transit problem correspond with major subway meltdowns. And most of the top dates over the past four years occurred in 2016 and 2017.

The findings show the real impact delays can have on city operations.

 

On Jan. 9, for example, city employees missed a total of 1,075 hours of work when transit problems made them late.

That Monday morning, an ice-blocked pipe started spilling water onto the tracks at the West 4th St.-Washington Square station, disrupting commutes on eight subway lines.

 

The leak wasn’t fixed until 9:48 a.m. — three hours after the mayhem began.

 

April 21 was another date where large numbers of city employees punched in late for work due to subway issues.

 

That Friday morning a power outage shut down the 53rd St.-Seventh Ave. station for several hours, backing up trains throughout the underground system. In total, 1,066 city work hours were lost, according to the IBO.

 

City workers missed another 725 hours due to transit problems on May 9.

 

That morning a power outage at the Dekalb Ave. station at 8:30 a.m. snarled rides on the B, C, D, F, N, Q, R and W lines. Service was restored an hour later.

 

A spokesman for Mayor de Blasio said the lost hours are more proof that the state should back his tax plan to save the subway system.

 

“Riders’ cries might be out of Albany’s earshot, but they’re mad as hell and they won’t stand for it anymore — including our city employees,” sai d mayoral spokesman Austin Finan.

 

551762603.jpg Commuters are used to seeing delays like this one mount as trains run late.  (JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

“The state should step up now and support the mayor’s plan to tax the wealthiest 1 percent to pay for the fix of our subways and buses, and return the half-million dollars it took from the MTA to fund the immediate turnaround plan. It’s time to get to work — literally.”

 

An MTA spokesman said the city should shoulder some of responsibility and pick up part of the tab to fix the subway system.

 

“Any increase in delays experienced on the subway show the critical need to support and fund the MTA’s Subway Action Plan and why City Hall and Mayor de Blasio should step up and fund their half of the plan,” the spokesman, Shams Tarek, said.

 

The IBO based its analysis on a city worker database known as the Citywide Human Resources Management System. The database shows all excused lateness due to transit delays.

 

When a city worker is late for a reason outside their control, they can enter a code explaining their tardiness.

They must also submit proof. Riders can call or go online to request delay verification letters from the MTA.

 

If city workers get the late arrivals excused, they are paid for the missed time.

Still, the transit delays lead to squandered tax dollars.

 

The median salary for a city employee in 2015 was $67,372, or about $32.40 an hour for a 40-hour work week. Based on that hourly rate, the 17,143 hours that were excused so far this year equals about $555,000 in pay.

 

That means a half-million dollars went to city workers for time they were stuck in transit.

And the problem is certainly far worse.

 

While the city database captures worker information for major agencies — including the NYPD, FDNY and the Sanitation Department — three large departments are not included.

 

The database does not provide information on employees at the Department of Education, NYCHA and the Health and Hos pitals Corporation. These agencies have a combined workforce of more than 200,000 employees.

 

Many of these employees are likely straphangers who have also ended up late for work because of shoddy subway service.

 

Kenneth Wynder, president of the Law Enforcement Employee Benevolent Association, said he tells his 800 members to document delays, especially because they start their jobs at times when there might be service disruptions.

 

671150280.jpg Widespread delays due to aging equipment and power outages have kept travelers steamed.  (DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES)

DNAinfo New York reported last year that the MTA gave out 129,000 tardy slips in 2015. The agency handed out 31,000 in 2010.

 

“We do encourage them to call MTA and get that slip,” said Wynder, whose members include the Department of Environmental Protection police officers, Department of Transportation inspectors and Sanitation enforcement agents.

“Members are utilizing them because they are saving time and saving punishment.”

 

The MTA and its aging subway system has come under fire from fed-up straphangers and elected officials in the past few years as delays have exploded and ridership has ballooned.

 

Just in the past year there has been a dramatic drop in reliable service.

 

In May, 67,452 weekday subway trains were delayed, according to the most recent agency data. In May 2016, the number was 50,436.

 

The transit system’s failures crescendoed into an all-out crisis this summer when Gov. Cuomo declared a state of emergency and picked Joe Lhota as the agency’s chairman to oversee the Subway Action Plan, an $800 million rapid repair program.

 

Sifuentes, of the Riders Alliance, said that the IBO data shows what kind of impact subway delays can have on anyone with a job in the city.

 

Many hourly workers don’t have their subway delays excused and end up with smaller paychecks, he said.

 

“For them the lost pay could mean choosing between, ‘I might not make rent this month or I won’t buy groceries,’” Sifuentes said.

 

Controller Scott Stringer’s office conducted a survey of straphangers in July to gauge the economic impact of subway delays. The findings showed that residents of lower-income city zip codes were more likely to be reprimanded for being late to work.

 

Subway service problems can also be a double whammy for some families — making parents late for work and preventing them from picking up children on time from day care, the survey showed.

 

“We may have a new record in excused lateness because of train delays,” Stringer said in a statement to The News about the IBO analysis.

 

“What there is no excuse for, is the train delays themselves.”

 

Source: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/transit-woes-cost-city-17k-hours-lost-worker-time-2017-article-1.3453202

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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Well lucky for me all I need is the car # and give it to the dispatcher and I'm good lol. As long as he train was originally scheduled to arrive at the terminal before my report time I'm good :)

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Well lucky for me all I need is the car # and give it to the dispatcher and I'm good lol. As long as he train was originally scheduled to arrive at the terminal before my report time I'm good :)

I should get a job at the MTA. That sounds like an awesome perk integrated into the job.

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I should get a job at the MTA. That sounds like an awesome perk integrated into the job.

I don't think it's the same if you're in the office though.  The two summers I worked in the (MTA) office, they had a strict policy about being late.  Likely varies depending on what you do and where you are.

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I should get a job at the MTA. That sounds like an awesome perk integrated into the job.

 

In transit operations we are supposed to use the system when we move about, so its not really a perk..

 

Its in the Rules.

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In transit operations we are supposed to use the system when we move about, so its not really a perk..

 

Its in the Rules.

Already do. I don’t drive, and I have no plans to get a license.

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Already do. I don’t drive, and I have no plans to get a license.

Yet in order to work down here now as per the last OC Train operators test a license is required....

Edited by RTOMan
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Yet in order to work down here now as per the last OC Train operators test a license is required....

 

 

Wow, so what if your license gets suspended over unpaid tickets or something?

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Wow, so what if your license gets suspended over unpaid tickets or something?

 

Anyone trying to work for city, state, or federal government in any capacity is subject to a full background check which includes unpaid tickets. Anyone who owes money to any US government is ineligible for appointment to any government position, regardless of whether or not a driver's license is required, until they pay off their debt.

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Already do. I don’t drive, and I have no plans to get a license.

That's not smart. Most job positions these days require you to have a valid driver license. Going forward you'll most likely need a valid license get a government job and most other jobs....

Edited by elantra06
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That's not smart. Most job positions these days require you to have a valid driver license. Going forward you'll most likely need a valid license get a government job and most other jobs....

I’ve been getting by with my non-driver ID card issued at the DMV.

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I’ve been getting by with my non-driver ID card issued at the DMV.

Same deal when I had mine...

 

Employers will ask for a "driver's license", but in many cases a non-driver ID will most certainly suffice....

I have yet to see or hear of a company specifically ask that applicants present a non-driver's ID to HR or whoever :lol:

I'd say in a lot of cases, the term is code for either state issued ID (driver/non-driver).....

 

Hell, it's one thing if you're applying for a field tech position, it's another if you're applying for a run-of-the-mill office job or something......

 

I was fed that lie out of high school also (that you "gotta have your driver's license" - even if you don't drive) & I've came to find out over time that the shit was not all that necessary....

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Except that the NOE for T/O stated that a valid license in required. I'd hate to miss out on a good job because of something like that.

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I’ve been getting by with my non-driver ID card issued at the DMV.

Sure won't be getting a T/O job without a driver license. That's a guarantee.

Edited by elantra06

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What happens if a T/O's Drivers license gets suspended?

The NOE 7604 does not state the Driver's License must be maintained during employment in title.

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Once a person's in, they can not have a license; just like all those who got in without one, before they became required.

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What happens if a T/O's Drivers license gets suspended?

Transit won't care unless the suspension is for a DWI/DUI. Only then will it possibly affect your continued employment.

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