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Track Worker Exam # 8600

+Young+

As of January 8th, 2020, the list for this particular exam has been published. To view your list number, click here and type either your name or '8600' in the search box on the top right, followed by pressing 'enter.'

While we are waiting to get called, this downloadable PDF file might be of interest, especially to those who have a low list number. In addition, for those of you who are seeking more information, I would encourage you to read the Track Worker 3600 Hiring Process thread. This thread contains a lot of useful information.

Good luck and stay safe out there!!

Message added by +Young+

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On 3/2/2020 at 2:38 PM, Rj617 said:

While we all wait for any new updates,  can anyone explain the difference between titles track worker, track worker specialist,  track worker 01-f, track worker (a) ? Just any info regarding the titles, pay scale, responsibilities and career path. Thx

A track specialist is a track worker who selected certain jobs at the main pick that either require them to have had additional training provided by transit, or have a commercial driver's licence.  A track worker will need to pick a certain type of job as a dual-rate first, and after at least a year as a dual rate, they will then be qualified to pick the specialist version of that job at the pick or via a bid.  Here's an example, A track worker picks a dual-rate welder job at the pick, transit trains them to do the job, after a year of having the title of dual-rate welder, they can now pick a specialist welder job pick if it's available to them at the next pick or bid.

A track specialist pay rate is currently $36.975, and tops out at $39.8175 in May 2022.  Track specialists are all paid the same rate regardless if they perform specialist work or not.  Dual-rates get paid the specialist rate only on the days they perform the specialist task, and on the days they don't, they get their regular track pay.

 

Career path options for track workers with just exams: 

A)  Track worker  ------> Maintenance Supervisor level 1 Track 

B) Track worker --------> Power Distribution Maintainer  (Third Rail Operations) --------> Maintenance Supervisor Level 1 Power Distribution

MS level 2  and Superintendent are positions you interview for and may have to meet education and additional requirements for.  

 

The pay scale info was answered earlier.

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On 2/21/2020 at 11:10 PM, Queensqueens111 said:

By law they are suppose to have about 2500 trackworkers due to the mileage of track in the system. But I don’t think they ever keep that number up. We’ll see come the pick how many jobs are budgeted.  Think last pick had about 2100 jobs to choice from, so I suspect at least 200 hopefully being hired this year.

@Queensqueens111 I recently just bought a house and moved from my old address. What do I have to do to get in touch with them to give them an updated address? 

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23 minutes ago, amendamatrix said:

A track specialist is a track worker who selected certain jobs at the main pick that either require them to have had additional training provided by transit, or have a commercial driver's licence.  A track worker will need to pick a certain type of job as a dual-rate first, and after at least a year as a dual rate, they will then be qualified to pick the specialist version of that job at the pick or via a bid.  Here's an example, A track worker picks a dual-rate welder job at the pick, transit trains them to do the job, after a year of having the title of dual-rate welder, they can now pick a specialist welder job pick if it's available to them at the next pick or bid.

A track specialist pay rate is currently $36.975, and tops out at $39.8175 in May 2022.  Track specialists are all paid the same rate regardless if they perform specialist work or not.  Dual-rates get paid the specialist rate only on the days they perform the specialist task, and on the days they don't, they get their regular track pay.

 

Career path options for track workers with just exams: 

A)  Track worker  ------> Maintenance Supervisor level 1 Track 

B) Track worker --------> Power Distribution Maintainer  (Third Rail Operations) --------> Maintenance Supervisor Level 1 Power Distribution

MS level 2  and Superintendent are positions you interview for and may have to meet education and additional requirements for.  

 

The pay scale info was answered earlier.

Awesome information.  Thank you 

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2 hours ago, amendamatrix said:

A track specialist is a track worker who selected certain jobs at the main pick that either require them to have had additional training provided by transit, or have a commercial driver's licence.  A track worker will need to pick a certain type of job as a dual-rate first, and after at least a year as a dual rate, they will then be qualified to pick the specialist version of that job at the pick or via a bid.  Here's an example, A track worker picks a dual-rate welder job at the pick, transit trains them to do the job, after a year of having the title of dual-rate welder, they can now pick a specialist welder job pick if it's available to them at the next pick or bid.

A track specialist pay rate is currently $36.975, and tops out at $39.8175 in May 2022.  Track specialists are all paid the same rate regardless if they perform specialist work or not.  Dual-rates get paid the specialist rate only on the days they perform the specialist task, and on the days they don't, they get their regular track pay.

 

Career path options for track workers with just exams: 

A)  Track worker  ------> Maintenance Supervisor level 1 Track 

B) Track worker --------> Power Distribution Maintainer  (Third Rail Operations) --------> Maintenance Supervisor Level 1 Power Distribution

MS level 2  and Superintendent are positions you interview for and may have to meet education and additional requirements for.  

 

The pay scale info was answered earlier.

Thank you for the in-depth breakdown very informational. But, i have my CDL class B license. So my question is what is the career path for someone who has a CDL class B and is class A required or is class B enough. Thanks again very helpful.

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On 3/4/2020 at 11:44 AM, 9thGenAccord said:

Thank you for the in-depth breakdown very informational. But, i have my CDL class B license. So my question is what is the career path for someone who has a CDL class B and is class A required or is class B enough. Thanks again very helpful.

The jobs that require a CDL will tell you which type of CDL is required for that position.  I can't really answer more than that, since I never had CDL credentials.  I will say that CDL required dual-rate jobs are easier to get relative to ones that don't simply because only a small percent of track workers have them.  Questions like these are best asked when your in track safety training.  The instructors will explain this in detail at various points in training.  

 

You career path is the same as I listed earlier, the CDL only allows you to pick certain Dual-Rate or Specialist jobs, but you're still a track worker at the end of the day, It doesn't really affect anything else really.  

 

Another important thing to know too is that track worker is a safety sensitive job title, so you are subject to random drug tests.  If you fail a test once in your career, they put you in a program, and increase the testing rate on you.  If you fail a test any time after that, they fire you.  I would suggest weaning yourself off any recreation drug habits right now and give yourself time to adjust to living life without them.  Failing a random once is SUPER inconvenient; you can get suspended without pay for a while, be forced to attend boring meetings on your own time multiple times a week for months, among a host of other problems you don't want.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, amendamatrix said:

The jobs that require a CDL will tell you which type of CDL is required for that position.  I can't really answer more than that, since I never had CDL credentials.  I will say that CDL required dual-rate jobs are easier to get relative to ones that don't simply because only a small percent of track workers have them.  Questions like these are best asked when your in track safety training.  The instructors will explain this in detail at various points in training. 

Since I have a Class A CDL, in which I took a road test in a tractor-trailer and a bus, I don't mind filling you in.

As per this DMV document, you need a Class A CDL to drive a tractor-trailer, such as the vehicle that can be seen in this, this, this, this, this, this, and this image.

You need a Class B CDL to drive a "single unit or truck," which can be seen here.

Therefore, like it was previously stated, it depends on the specific position. If the position calls for a CDL, whether it is a Class A or B, it will say it on the "pick sheets," along with what endorsements you need as well.

The good news though is, once you pass the road test in either the tractor-trailer and/or the bus or straight truck, if you decide to get an endorsement or two, such as "Hazmat," "Tow Truck," etc., you do not need to take another road test.

 

Edited by +Young+
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Great information all around. I was reading up on the specialist picks and the qualifications Here. Just need some more clarification if anyone can provide. I understand that you must go through 'dual rate' first before you can land specialist job. In order to.land the dual rate positions, do you need a certification that is associated with the position or does the MTA provide the training/costs for the certification?. Example,  should I get my welding certification first before applying or does the mta provide the training? Thanks in advance to all responses !

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18 hours ago, amendamatrix said:

The jobs that require a CDL will tell you which type of CDL is required for that position.  I can't really answer more than that, since I never had CDL credentials.  I will say that CDL required dual-rate jobs are easier to get relative to ones that don't simply because only a small percent of track workers have them.  Questions like these are best asked when your in track safety training.  The instructors will explain this in detail at various points in training.  

 

You career path is the same as I listed earlier, the CDL only allows you to pick certain Dual-Rate or Specialist jobs, but you're still a track worker at the end of the day, It doesn't really affect anything else really.  

 

Another important thing to know too is that track worker is a safety sensitive job title, so you are subject to random drug tests.  If you fail a test once in your career, they put you in a program, and increase the testing rate on you.  If you fail a test any time after that, they fire you.  I would suggest weaning yourself off any recreation drug habits right now and give yourself time to adjust to living life without them.  Failing a random once is SUPER inconvenient; you can get suspended without pay for a while, be forced to attend boring meetings on your own time multiple times a week for months, among a host of other problems you don't want.

Thank you for the information i will keep it in mind when i get called up. As far as the recreation drugs never been that person to do those things but of course there are people who do and that’s a good heads up to anyone on the list so thanks for that as well.

 

15 hours ago, +Young+ said:

Since I have a Class A CDL, in which I took a road test in a tractor-trailer and a bus, I don't mind filling you in.

As per this DMV document, you need a Class A CDL to drive a tractor-trailer, such as the vehicle that can be seen in this, this, this, this, this, this, and this image.

You need a Class B CDL to drive a "single unit or truck," which can be seen here.

Therefore, like it was previously stated, it depends on the specific position. If the position calls for a CDL, whether it is a Class A or B, it will say it on the "pick sheets," along with what endorsements you need as well.

The good news though is, once you pass the road test in either the tractor-trailer and/or the bus or straight truck, if you decide to get an endorsement or two, such as "Hazmat," "Tow Truck," etc., you do not need to take another road test.

 

Well looks like there are a lot more opportunities with a class A then there is for class B so i think I’m going to try and get my class A before they start the process. Thanks for the Insight this is very helpful.

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18 minutes ago, 9thGenAccord said:

Well looks like there are a lot more opportunities with a class A then there is for class B so i think I’m going to try and get my class A before they start the process. Thanks for the Insight this is very helpful.

You're welcome.

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, +Young+ said:

Well looks like there are a lot more opportunities with a class A then there is for class B so i think I’m going to try and get my class A before they start the process. Thanks for the Insight this is very helpful.

Last pick they were begging for class b people, letting them pick out of turn to fill up the driver positions. Every night the track gangs need power tools delivered to their job sites. Quarters only have hand tools, the power tools and other supplies for night come and go via truck. I was on the job for 5 months and kids from my class were getting driver spots.

 

18 hours ago, Rj617 said:

Great information all around. I was reading up on the specialist picks and the qualifications Here. Just need some more clarification if anyone can provide. I understand that you must go through 'dual rate' first before you can land specialist job. In order to.land the dual rate positions, do you need a certification that is associated with the position or does the MTA provide the training/costs for the certification?. Example,  should I get my welding certification first before applying or does the mta provide the training? Thanks in advance to all responses !

Don't need anything, MTA doesn't recognize outside stuff. Yes in order to become a full rate you have to be a dual rate or have been a dual rate within the last year. All dual rate spots are open at the pick. If you happen to pick a dual rate welder they just send you to a 3 day training course at the school and give you a letter to get your welding PPE and thats it, you are free to help on welding jobs now.

Track inspector has prerequisite that you have to have a year on the job already before you an pick a dual rate. That dual rate has a class for it which you can fail out of and lose the title.

Edited by Queensqueens111

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On 3/4/2020 at 9:46 AM, Marv said:

@Queensqueens111 I recently just bought a house and moved from my old address. What do I have to do to get in touch with them to give them an updated address? 

that I wouldn't know, you would have to get in touch with DCAS i think. Can try searching the old trackworker thread for numbers to livingston street to call and ask too.

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3 hours ago, Queensqueens111 said:

 

Don't need anything, MTA doesn't recognize outside stuff. Yes in order to become a full rate you have to be a dual rate or have been a dual rate within the last year. All dual rate spots are open at the pick. If you happen to pick a dual rate welder they just send you to a 3 day training course at the school and give you a letter to get your welding PPE and thats it, you are free to help on welding jobs now.

Track inspector has prerequisite that you have to have a year on the job already before you an pick a dual rate. That dual rate has a class for it which you can fail out of and lose the title.

Thanks for the info, greatly appreciated! 

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3 hours ago, Queensqueens111 said:

that I wouldn't know, you would have to get in touch with DCAS i think. Can try searching the old trackworker thread for numbers to livingston street to call and ask too.

Fill out this and this form, and then send both forms to NYC Transit and DCAS, respectively.

Good luck!!

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good luck everyone, iam a trackworker here and my advice to you guys and everyone else after they are hired  is to take the promotional exams for ms1 (maintenance supervisor level 1) and promotional exam for pdm (power distribuition maintaner sometimes call 3rd rail maintaner) . Do these as soon as possible and keep taking them when they come out until you get them. i waited 18 years to take the ms1 exam just to see what i would score. i got promoted then after 3 months gave back the title because after 20 years of seniorty my job was too sweet and i was too spoiled to start over. had i taken it sooner i would of kept the job. Happy to answer any questions if i can. I came on here to see if they were calling off this list yet.

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4 minutes ago, americanpit13 said:

good luck everyone, iam a trackworker here and my advice to you guys and everyone else after they are hired  is to take the promotional exams for ms1 (maintenance supervisor level 1) and promotional exam for pdm (power distribuition maintaner sometimes call 3rd rail maintaner) . Do these as soon as possible and keep taking them when they come out until you get them. i waited 18 years to take the ms1 exam just to see what i would score. i got promoted then after 3 months gave back the title because after 20 years of seniorty my job was too sweet and i was too spoiled to start over. had i taken it sooner i would of kept the job. Happy to answer any questions if i can. I came on here to see if they were calling off this list yet.

Question, I spoke to a Track Worker who was getting promoted to Ms1 a few days ago and he told me his seniority went down 400. I'm assuming they've closed the cleaning gangs that were created with Subway Action Plan. If you have 400 less workers down there right now, what's going on with the gangs in terms of staffing.

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he went down 400 numbers because after 2 years they just  sent out a new seniority list.new employeess make there biggest seniorty jump in the first few years. they dont lay ppl off or anything like that. he went down 400 because he is fairly new and in 2 years there were lots retirees , promotions and terminations. when i say terminations im talking about ppl that got arrested employed, abused sick, came up dirty on 2 drug test and ppl who left for better jobs. there was a tremedous jump this list because transit just pushed the new kronos swipe in swipe out with fingerprints system in. i wont get into to much detail about that, but it was an inconvenience to some of the senior guys.  doesnt necessarily mean there a 400 less workers because im sure they hired ppl behind him, he just moved up 400 numbers. 

 

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if they closed cleaning gangs, then they opened up more maintenance gangs or captial gangs. i dont know if they in fact closed those cleaning gangs or not. they will have spots for every worker. to me the only thing that was lost when the SAP went was the sweet overtime. Ot is still here , but dam that SAP was good and it worked! delays were down all over

 

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Right but they haven't had a class go in since mid 2018. Between mid 2018 and now they haven't replaced anyone that quit/retired/fired/promoted etc, what I'm getting at is what happens to gangs when they go down in manpower and their slots haven't been replaced. 

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oh ok, so when they were done hiring last we were at like 2300 plus trackworkers, in my 20 years i never seen it that high. when i was new i started at 17xx. so track is very different than other departments in transit. if a gang has 8 ppl and 2 left they get along fine usually because the big jobs pool multiple gangs together. the smaller jobs dont usually make a difference when your down a man or two. sometimes if they are really short like in my department. they will offer am guys to work a double shift to cover the pm guys who are out sick or short handed and vice versa. if they are really really short they just pool the guys they got in each zone to get the important jobs done, so there maybe one to two gangs on a plate job. 3 to fourr gangs on a rail job etc etc. they will do less jobs a day . they will take it in order of the track in worse condition. unlike train operators , conductors , bus operators, cleaners, its not as important in track to have 100 percent work force. its way easier to get days off in track than those others . and summer vacations which ive had since my first year.

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Hello everyone, so I took this exam and I have a decent list number. Which I'm worried about since I had knee surgery for a torn meniscus last year. Will this prevent me from getting the job? Thanks in advance

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Bmart212 said:

Hello everyone, so I took this exam and I have a decent list number. Which I'm worried about since I had knee surgery for a torn meniscus last year. Will this prevent me from getting the job? Thanks in advance.

If you pass the physical you should be ok. Just make sure to let them know don't try and hide it.

Edited by Thinklikeamango

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On 3/8/2020 at 5:29 AM, Queensqueens111 said:

Last pick they were begging for class b people, letting them pick out of turn to fill up the driver positions. Every night the track gangs need power tools delivered to their job sites. Quarters only have hand tools, the power tools and other supplies for night come and go via truck. I was on the job for 5 months and kids from my class were getting driver spots.

 

Don't need anything, MTA doesn't recognize outside stuff. Yes in order to become a full rate you have to be a dual rate or have been a dual rate within the last year. All dual rate spots are open at the pick. If you happen to pick a dual rate welder they just send you to a 3 day training course at the school and give you a letter to get your welding PPE and thats it, you are free to help on welding jobs now.

Track inspector has prerequisite that you have to have a year on the job already before you an pick a dual rate. That dual rate has a class for it which you can fail out of and lose the title.

So in your opinion do you think i should just ride it out with my class B? Because the information the other guy gave implied there are more job opportunities for a class A. Also remaining with my B saves me $2000++

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On 3/8/2020 at 5:35 AM, Queensqueens111 said:

that I wouldn't know, you would have to get in touch with DCAS i think. Can try searching the old trackworker thread for numbers to livingston street to call and ask too.

Thanks I call Livingston and see if someone can direct me. 

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