Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.
Sign in to follow this  
GojiMet86

Ditmars Boulevard Subway Station to Undergo 14-Months of Construction

Recommended Posts

https://astoriapost.com/ditmars-boulevard-subway-station-undergo-14-months-construction

 

Quote

 

Ditmars Boulevard Subway Station to Undergo 14-Months of Construction

Feb. 6, 2018 By Tara Law

The Ditmars Boulevard subway station is about to undergo a 14-month revamp starting this April, the MTA notified Astoria’s elected officials Monday.

The station, used by N/W riders, will not be fully closed, although construction materials and equipment will be stored on 31st Street throughout the length of the project.

The news comes at a time when many residents and elected officials are already upset with the MTA stemming from the eight-month closure of the 30th Avenue and 36th Avenue subway stations that began in October.

Local residents, businesses and politicians have complained that these renovations are largely cosmetic and are not worthy of the lengthy closures. They claim that the MTA should have invested the time and funds in service improvements and added elevators to make the stations handicap accessible.

Furthermore, the MTA plans to close the 39th Avenue and Broadway N/W stations for seven months for similar repairs, starting in July.

The MTA’s planned revamp of the Ditmars Blvd station—at a cost of $22 million– will be similar to the four other N/W stations. It will involve repairing the station building, adding new benches and installing public art, among other items, according to elected officials. However, the MTA will not be making track improvements, nor will it be updating the subway signals or adding elevators.

Council Member Costa Constantinides, State Senator Mike Gianaris, and Assembly Member Aravella Simotas issued a joint statement today calling the Ditmars Blvd revamp a “slap in the face of Astorians.” The elected officials claim the revamp will be disruptive and not worthy of the inconvenience, given that the plan fails to include elevators or make service improvements.

“All this construction is a recipe for disaster, inconveniencing riders, hurting small businesses and blocking busy streets,” Simotas said. “The MTA seems oblivious to this pain and the things that subway riders really need– working trains that run on time and elevators to help the elderly, the disabled and parents with children— the MTA is ignoring.”

The three elected officials plan to hold a rally Thursday outside the station at 4:30 p.m. to call for service and accessibility improvements.

Constantinides has also launched a petition calling for better service and accessibility on the N/W line.

Constantinides said in an interview that he was frustrated that the electeds had only learned of the project Monday, although the planning had begun months earlier.

“This particular project was dropped out of the sky,” he said. “If they were really serious about taking suggestions, they would have engaged with us earlier.”

Gianaris said that he is concerned that the renovations at the Ditmars Boulevard station will cause the same problems as at the 30th and 36th avenue stations. The closures have hurt local business, he said. Two storefronts by the 30th Avenue station— a dollar store and Opa! Souvlaki of Astoria— have already closed.

He said that the project is indicative of the MTA’s “poor decision making.”

“I understand that the subway system is old, but let’s do work that makes the subway run on time and makes it easier for people with disabilities to get on and off,” he said.

The MTA did not respond by press time to provide additional details of the plan.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that's a load of BS. I have to agree with the Astorians here. Dimars Blvd revamp could've been better planned. They could've expanded the mezzanine along with adding elevators make it more accessible. Heck, they could've added relay tracks with provisions for a new yard, or even to LGA. Foreshame  (MTA)

Or is the (MTA) getting revenge on the NIMBY's who shot down the LGA extension ? 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cancel the project. The money is better spent on making Astoria Boulevard a terminal, or changing the switch geometry/arrangement to allow for increased capacity at Ditmars. Putting lipstick on a pig is never helpful. 

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Man, these stations look like crap. The MTA really needs to do something about this." - riders

"They can't close my station. I need it to get to work." - riders

I always find this mentality quite hilarious. I get the frustration over the complete disregard for ADA accessibility, but if riders want these stations to be renovated, they're going to have to put up with the inconvenience of construction work. This would be a perfect opportunity to test an ESI-style closure, but as Ditmars Blvd is ranked 82nd in terms of station usage and 30 Avenue and 36 Avenue are still closed, the amount of passengers crowding onto the other Astoria stations would be unmanageable.

  • Like 2
  • LMAO! 3
  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be easy to add elevators at Ditmars, and build them directly from the street to the platform, so only 1, not 2, would be required. It's a 2-track island platform terminal with the sole entries and mezzanine in the middle. You could build a new fare control at the stub (north) end, at the end of the tracks, similar to most other elevated terminals like Woodlawn, Lefferts, 242nd, etc. There you could build an elevator on one side of the street directly to the platform fare control level.

Of course, this would preclude any future extension, so I wonder if the MTA still has hopes of an extension to LAG? But I would doubt it given the proposed Airtrain to Willets Point. 
 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They should take this opportunity to extend the El so that terminating trains can enter the station at a normal speed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lance said:

"Man, these stations look like crap. The MTA really needs to do something about this." - riders

"They can't close my station. I need it to get to work." - riders 

The thing is it's often different riders with those complaints. Me personally, I only care about getting into the station to catch my train: The less time I spend there (i.e. The better service is), the happier I am.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Coney Island Av said:

Wasted opportunity. The money should instead go to extending the line to LGA, so that way we can have a @LGA Link N train ! 

I'm sure this has been brought up before, but expanding the (N)(W) to LGA wouldn't provide a faster alternative to the bus/cabs/ridesharing. The Astoria line meanders and makes too many stops. At least with JFK you have the QBL and the LIRR express which zips you into Manhattan pretty fast, (AirTrain to the (E) is about the same as driving, AirTrain to LIRR is always faster then driving.) I seriously doubt the the (N)(W) would beat a car into Manhattan, and you can forget about getting from LGA to Brooklyn without using a car.

In addition, take a look at pic related.

wQUuowY.png

Look at how far apart the terminals are, you would need at least 3 stations (one for each terminal) to cover the airport adequately, if you built only one station for the airport many passengers would have to use the LGA shuttle bus, creating confusion and adding to travel time. Unless full time express service is added on to the Astoria line, I don't see an @LGA Link N train being feasible (sorry.) The current travel options are simply better. Lastly, when building an airport expansion its important to know who you are building for, tourists, tourists are not familiar with the Subway system and are automatically more inclined to use a taxi service instead of the train, which is why its hyper important that in addition to being faster than hiring a cab, it should be equally as simple (a crucial part that AirTrain misses IMO.)

3 hours ago, Lance said:

"Man, these stations look like crap. The MTA really needs to do something about this." - riders

"They can't close my station. I need it to get to work." - riders

I always find this mentality quite hilarious. I get the frustration over the complete disregard for ADA accessibility, but if riders want these stations to be renovated, they're going to have to put up with the inconvenience of construction work. This would be a perfect opportunity to test an ESI-style closure, but as Ditmars Blvd is ranked 82nd in terms of station usage and 30 Avenue and 36 Avenue are still closed, the amount of passengers crowding onto the other Astoria stations would be unmanageable.

I don't think this is accurate. No track work is being done, and no signal work is being done, the upgrades are purely cosmetic. Nothing is being done to improve service, and I'm not convinced that the entire station needs to be shut down for over a year to repair stairs and retile the platforms. This is a major gripe I had/have with the Sea Beach and Culver station shutdowns. Artwork and new tiles are not going to fix the delays and poor service.

Also, if you are going to shut down a station for a year, you better at least add a f**king elevator. Thats the way I see it.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, kosciusko said:

In addition, take a look at pic related.

<large-ass picture>

Look at how far apart the terminals are, you would need at least 3 stations (one for each terminal) to cover the airport adequately, if you built only one station for the airport many passengers would have to use the LGA shuttle bus, creating confusion and adding to travel time. Unless full time express service is added on to the Astoria line, I don't see an @LGA Link N train being feasible (sorry.) The current travel options are simply better. Lastly, when building an airport expansion its important to know who you are building for, tourists, tourists are not familiar with the Subway system and are automatically more inclined to use a taxi service instead of the train, which is why its hyper important that in addition to being faster than hiring a cab, it should be equally as simple (a crucial part that AirTrain misses IMO.)

Idk if you've heard, but they're rebuilding LaGuardia, to the point where the terminal will basically be right up around the Grand Central Parkway. And there will only be one terminal.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Coney Island Av said:

Wasted opportunity. The money should instead go to extending the line to LGA, so that way we can have a @LGA Link N train ! 

Just terminate all the trains at Astoria Blvd. But I will side with the Astorians since they didn't illegally squat on property...

I mean, look at New Lots, it practically looks the same visually before the other stops were renovated...

If they close Ditmars Blvd, on top of the other overlapping ESI/rehab-related station closures, the remaining Astoria line stations would not be able to handle the increased ridership. As I mentioned in my previous post, Ditmars Blvd receives a fair amount of riders. You can't just shuffle them all onto the next available station and hope they don't overload the platform.

15 hours ago, Italianstallion said:

Of course, this would preclude any future extension, so I wonder if the MTA still has hopes of an extension to LAG? But I would doubt it given the proposed Airtrain to Willets Point. 

I think that train has long since left the station. The likelihood of seeing an extension of the Astoria line anywhere is virtually nil. More so given Cuomo's unwavering support for the roundabout Willets Point Developments Shuttle AirTrain LGA.

15 hours ago, P3F said:

They should take this opportunity to extend the El so that terminating trains can enter the station at a normal speed.

See above.

15 hours ago, checkmatechamp13 said:

The thing is it's often different riders with those complaints. Me personally, I only care about getting into the station to catch my train: The less time I spend there (i.e. The better service is), the happier I am.

I know. It's still pretty funny though.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's the problem with extending elevated lines in this generation, residents will complain and drive you nuts about the noise this new extension might bring, the privacy issues, etc. People complain about wanting more service to their areas, yet then they start complaining about noise and privacy issues and etc.

These elevated extensions should have been done before in the 1900's to avoid this type of problem. And another thing that irks me is that they tore down elevated lines that they should have left alone, because it would have greatly helped out riders in this century. And at times they did it stupidly, like tearing down the Elevated SAS instead of waiting until they were sure the underground SAS was finished.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lance said:

I think that train has long since left the station. The likelihood of seeing an extension of the Astoria line anywhere is virtually nil. More so given Cuomo's unwavering support for the roundabout Willets Point Developments Shuttle AirTrain LGA.

See above.

The LGA Airtrain has nothing to do with the possibility of extending the tracks a few yards to increase terminal capacity by a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Coney Island Av said:

Wasted opportunity. The money should instead go to extending the line to LGA, so that way we can have a @LGA Link N train ! 

Just terminate all the trains at Astoria Blvd. But I will side with the Astorians since they didn't illegally squat on property...

I mean, look at New Lots, it practically looks the same visually before the other stops were renovated...

I would have actually looked to extend the (N) and (W) to The Bronx as part of a longer-term plan to have it go to Jacobi Medical Center that would include stops at East 180 for transfers to the (2)(5) and Westchester-Elder Avenue for the (6)  with a new OOS transfer between Queens Plaza and Queensboro Plaza.  This would be the one way you can have a line from The Bronx that allows those looking for Queens to be able to do so without going through Manhattan. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lawrence St said:

Here's the problem with extending elevated lines in this generation, residents will complain and drive you nuts about the noise this new extension might bring, the privacy issues, etc. People complain about wanting more service to their areas, yet then they start complaining about noise and privacy issues and etc.

These elevated extensions should have been done before in the 1900's to avoid this type of problem. And another thing that irks me is that they tore down elevated lines that they should have left alone, because it would have greatly helped out riders in this century. And at times they did it stupidly, like tearing down the Elevated SAS instead of waiting until they were sure the underground SAS was finished.

It's not a generational thing. People have never really favored the elevated lines. There is just a grudging acceptance that they serve a purpose to the riding public and cannot be torn down without an adequate replacement. Even back in the day, people did not want them in their neighborhoods. Soon after the 2nd Avenue line was built in the 1880s, people called for it to be torn down as it was considered a blight to their livelihoods. Remind you, this is before the original subway opened in 1904, so it wasn't as though there were alternatives around for people to use back then.

That sentiment towards the els would grow more and more as time moved on and the subway expanded from the turn of the century to 1940 when the 6th Avenue subway opened. People wanted those aging structures torn down as soon as possible and any extension proposed by the private companies or the IND had to be subway or nothing. A notable example of this is the Crosstown line, originally proposed as an elevated line connecting the Astoria and Franklin Ave lines. That idea never got off the ground because people in the neighborhoods affected protested vehemently against the project, even if they would've seen great benefits from the line. No, they preferred a meandering IND subway over the potentially more useful BMT elevated simply because it was underground.

This ideology would reach its peak after World War II when the East Side elevateds were torn down. Some of it was sabotage, like destroying the newer 2nd Avenue elevated and leaving the older, less sturdy 3rd Avenue line as the sole relief for the Lexington Ave subway, but a lot of the belief came from the fact that the west side got two subway lines to replace their elevateds in the midst of the Great Depression. People felt that if that could happen under such dire economic constraints, a replacement for the remaining elevated lines in good economic conditions should be much easier, which is exactly what the folks in charge sold the idea to riders. The 2nd Avenue subway was always "just a few years away", so short-term pain with overcrowded subway trains along Lexington Ave could be tolerated in order for riders to get a much better ride in the long-term.

Today, that sentiment has not changed. Sure, there are always the uber-NIMBYs and the BANANAs (Build Absolutely Nothing Anywhere Near Anyone), but people do have the right to go against useful projects when they negatively impact them. People don't have to accept a new elevated line or an extension of one because other riders want it. It has to be a balance between ridership demands and taking into account how this affects the people in the area.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazing that incompetence can go so far. Within the next three years, EVERY stop on the Astoria line will be "renovated" and only Astoria Blvd will get elevators (according to a separate document that details Astoria Blvd getting elevators)? And on top of that, no track improvements? What the hell has been getting done for the seven + years where the (N) was the sole service on the Astoria line outside rush hours from 2010-2017 (the constant Midday GOs which curtailed the secondary Astoria service to 57 St-7 Av) and the weekend shutdowns of local service (either to Manhattan or towards Ditmars Blvd). By this time, every foot of track between Queensboro Plaza and Ditmars Blvd, and every signal should have been replaced by then, and all that has been done in terms of track improvements, is a switch replacement at Ditmars Blvd that adds NO additional capacity to the terminal. My tax dollars at work (and all of yours too).

 

As for Ditmars Blvd's renovation, maybe ADA-accessible ramps could be added in lieu of an elevator if the MTA is THAT cheap or narrow-minded, and add the fare control to where the bumper blocks are (as suggested by someone earlier in this post) and remove that hideous billboard. 

For 30 Av, Broadway, 36 Av, and 39 Av, there is sufficient sidewalk space for provisions for elevators, so there is no excuse there for lack of elevators. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Coney Island Av said:

As mentioned before, the terminal layout would be reworked at LGA. The only station will be where LGA Terminal B is currently. Tourists will become familiar with this because the MTA lists travel options to/from the airport, and LGA will have these huge banners to indicate subway service.

But why do you think the Astoria line is too slow? It barely has any stops. From LGA, it is only 7 stops to Lexington Av-59 St, which is in Manhattan. It's only a few miles from Manhattan anyways.

 From JFK, you need to take AirTrain to Sutphin-Archer, and from there, it takes the same amount of stops to get to Lexington-53 St, which excludes any merging, weekend service, etc...

And have you ever heard of a thing called traffic? Everytime I went to JFK it took me a long time to go back to Manhattan because of the congested traffic along the Van Wyck. 

Didn't know that about the LGA terminal, thanks for the info. That makes me feel a lot better about the idea of an LGA (N) train.

But I still have a few problems with it.

Number of stops =/ to the amount of time it takes to traverse this distance of a line. I'll admit I've only been on the Astoria line once, and It took forever. The trains did not get moving very fast and the stops were frequent. In total it took over an hour to get from Midtown (where most hotels are) to Ditmars blvd and Google maps suggests the same amount of time. The (JFK) + (E) (on a good day) or LIRR can take you to midtown in under an hour. Geographically speaking LGA is way closer to Manhattan than JFK is, so the fact that it would take the same amount of time to access by transit is not acceptable imo. Driving to LGA from midtown takes under an hour if there is no traffic, and about 45 to an hour and a half if there is traffic.

I get that this is a hard point for me to argue, but I don't see the value in extending the (N) to LGA when driving will be almost always faster.

In my fantasy transit world I would have an automated high-speed people-mover running along the GCP and stoping at Astoria blvd, then continuing across the TriBoro to Harlem 125th to connect with the Metro-North, (4)(5)(6) and hopefully (Q) trains.

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/7/2018 at 10:04 PM, kosciusko said:

The current travel options are simply better. Lastly, when building an airport expansion its important to know who you are building for, tourists, tourists are not familiar with the Subway system and are automatically more inclined to use a taxi service instead of the train, which is why its hyper important that in addition to being faster than hiring a cab, it should be equally as simple (a crucial part that AirTrain misses IMO.)

Is this true? The N to Manhattan wouldn't beat a car stuck in traffic on the GCP or the Queensboro Bridge, plus traffic on local streets in Manhattan? It wouldn't beat a two-seat ride on a bus to a crowded subway line? How are the current options to LGA better than a direct Manhattan service?

As for the idea that newcomers are subway-averse, I'm not sure that's true. The Piccadilly Line, which meanders far more and makes many more stops on its journey from Heathrow Airport to central London, is the most popular method of city center to airport travel in London, mostly due to its low price and the ease of the direct ride.

There is value in an (N) extension to the airport - as not only would it serve the airport, but new stations could put residents of Ditmars-Steinway and East Elmhurst closer to a subway. I think it should happen, but I'm not holding my breath.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, officiallyliam said:

Is this true? The N to Manhattan wouldn't beat a car stuck in traffic on the GCP or the Queensboro Bridge, plus traffic on local streets in Manhattan? It wouldn't beat a two-seat ride on a bus to a crowded subway line? How are the current options to LGA better than a direct Manhattan service?

Yeah it is true, I fly out of LGA pretty frequently and there is often little to no traffic. People (especially here) really overestimate the amount of road traffic in the city. FDR drive to TriBoro to GCP is super quick.

9 minutes ago, officiallyliam said:

As for the idea that newcomers are subway-averse, I'm not sure that's true. The Piccadilly Line, which meanders far more and makes many more stops on its journey from Heathrow Airport to central London, is the most popular method of city center to airport travel in London, mostly due to its low price and the ease of the direct ride.

Not comparable imo, London is way less drivable, in addition to having a bunch of vehicle restrictions.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn, I have not heard the term BANANA in a while... My personal favorite is CAVE (citizens against virtually EVERYTHING).....

Anyway:

On 2/8/2018 at 10:52 PM, kosciusko said:

....People (especially here) really overestimate the amount of road traffic in the city. FDR drive to TriBoro to GCP is super quick.

Traffic on the GCP is overestimated.... Traffic on the FDR isn't.

18 hours ago, Coney Island Av said:

 Trains don't operate the same everyday.

Tell me about it....

Not only do they not operate the same everyday, the variances between them are growing..... The countdown clocks to me have become window dressing; I don't even look for them anymore....

On 2/7/2018 at 7:41 PM, checkmatechamp13 said:

The thing is it's often different riders with those complaints. Me personally, I only care about getting into the station to catch my train: The less time I spend there (i.e. The better service is), the happier I am.

I don't get what you're saying with the first part of the post.... Different riders, in what respect? In other words, (other than the fact that they're complaining) what separates these riders that you're differentiating, from the the commuters that aren't complaining.....

As for the other part of the post.... Yeah, the less time I spend at a station, the better off I am (for obvious reasons) - But at the same time, being in stations that are as stifling as Herald Sq, Union Sq, or 59th on the Lex (which is big to me, as I can't linger around in hot areas for too long a time w/o getting lightheaded), or reeks of piss like... at least what? half of every underground station, or leaking "water" (using finger quotes) on people like at 205th-Norwood, daily riders should be raising concerns about these things.... Of course, it'll end up falling on deaf ears most of the time....

On 2/7/2018 at 6:04 PM, Lance said:

"Man, these stations look like crap. The MTA really needs to do something about this." - riders

"They can't close my station. I need it to get to work." - riders

I always find this mentality quite hilarious. I get the frustration over the complete disregard for ADA accessibility, but if riders want these stations to be renovated, they're going to have to put up with the inconvenience of construction work. This would be a perfect opportunity to test an ESI-style closure, but as Ditmars Blvd is ranked 82nd in terms of station usage and 30 Avenue and 36 Avenue are still closed, the amount of passengers crowding onto the other Astoria stations would be unmanageable.

This is pretty much my take of all the riders panicking over the impending L train shutdown.... Can't just sit back & let things fester until kingdom come; complaining will be the least of their problems.... I have heard of people opting to leave (as in, move out of) Brooklyn when that rehabilitation project kicks off.... Whether that's just talk or not, by itself, I think it's a stupid thing to up & uproot for, but whatever...

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, B35 via Church said:

I don't get what you're saying with the first part of the post.... Different riders, in what respect? In other words, (other than the fact that they're complaining) what separates these riders that you're differentiating, from the the commuters that aren't complaining.....

2

I'm saying that the stances of the riders on the issue aren't always inconsistent the way he's describing.

So my stance is that, as long as a station is usable (no structural deficiencies, etc) then the MTA should skip any renovations and keep operating it as-is. If they did that, I wouldn't complain. However, if they decided to renovate a station that I felt didn't need renovation, then I would complain about the cost and service disruptions.

However, if the station actually needed a renovation (or if it were something major like adding elevators), then I would agree with the MTA's decision to temporarily shut down the station. Of course, it would be annoying to make my way to some alternate station for my commute, but I wouldn't complain because I know the shutdown is for a purpose.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, checkmatechamp13 said:

I'm saying that the stances of the riders on the issue aren't always inconsistent the way he's describing.

So my stance is that, as long as a station is usable (no structural deficiencies, etc) then the MTA should skip any renovations and keep operating it as-is. If they did that, I wouldn't complain. However, if they decided to renovate a station that I felt didn't need renovation, then I would complain about the cost and service disruptions.

However, if the station actually needed a renovation (or if it were something major like adding elevators), then I would agree with the MTA's decision to temporarily shut down the station. Of course, it would be annoying to make my way to some alternate station for my commute, but I wouldn't complain because I know the shutdown is for a purpose.

Commuters in this city are fickle like that.... He's absolutely right with that.

Rome wasn't built in a day.... New Yorkers have long had a stigma for being impatient & what Lance portrayed with that is a good illustration of it....

Now if the story is that Astorians didn't raise this issue of Ditmars looking like crap, and the MTA is taking the initiative to fix what really isn't broken (so to speak), and Astorians feel that it isn't worth the inconvenience in commuting time & worth the money spent on making the station more cosmetically appealing, I hear you.... But if Astorians are complaining that Ditmars looks like shit, and here they are bitching about rider inconvenience, hurting small businesses & crippling busy streets after hearing that this project will take a little over a year to complete, my response that is simply - Go to bed.... Can't stand people that are never satisfied.... There aren't any complaints being had though, when they're touting how much of a damn paradise Astoria is to non-Astorians... They're worse than Park Slopers with that....

It's okay to hoist pitchforks & raise hell about whatever the MTA lets deteriorate for however long it has, but when it comes time to rectify/fix whatever's being complained about, here comes some more pitchfork hoisting & hell raising.... What do you do with that?

Damned if you do, damned if you don't....

Edited by B35 via Church

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2018 at 10:40 PM, officiallyliam said:

The Piccadilly Line, which meanders far more and makes many more stops on its journey from Heathrow Airport to central London, is the most popular method of city center to airport travel in London, mostly due to its low price and the ease of the direct ride.

Crossrail might take that crown.  6 stops to Paddington Piccadilly is like 45-40mins on par with  (E)(A) I guess. I usually take the Tube coming into town and almost always the Heathrow express on the flight out. Abit harder my last trip out I stayed in Bloomsbury closer to St Pancras. 

Edited by RailRunRob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, B35 via Church said:

Commuters in this city are fickle like that.... He's absolutely right with that.

Rome wasn't built in a day.... New Yorkers have long had a stigma for being impatient & what Lance portrayed with that is a good illustration of it....

Now if the story is that Astorians didn't raise this issue of Ditmars looking like crap, and the MTA is taking the initiative to fix what really isn't broken (so to speak), and Astorians feel that it isn't worth the inconvenience in commuting time & worth the money spent on making the station more cosmetically appealing, I hear you.... But if Astorians are complaining that Ditmars looks like shit, and here they are bitching about rider inconvenience, hurting small businesses & crippling busy streets after hearing that this project will take a little over a year to complete, my response that is simply - Go to bed.... Can't stand people that are never satisfied.... There aren't any complaints being had though, when they're touting how much of a damn paradise Astoria is to non-Astorians... They're worse than Park Slopers with that....

It's okay to hoist pitchforks & raise hell about whatever the MTA lets deteriorate for however long it has, but when it comes time to rectify/fix whatever's being complained about, here comes some more pitchfork hoisting & hell raising.... What do you do with that?

Damned if you do, damned if you don't....

 

 

As an Astorian,  I haven't heard from people I know, or from just word on the street, any really real desire, by Astorians, to renovate the stations. Now politicians themselves might have said something at some point, but I have never gotten any impression from Astorians to have the MTA renovate. What the loudest grumbling from Astorians (gathered from FB groups, as if that's an indicator) is the same sort of complaint you might have heard these last couple of years, which is with MTA's service itself (delays, inconsistent service, lack of communication, etc).

I was at the little rally they held two days ago on the stairs at Ditmars. The biggest issues, in no specific order, seemed to be that:

1. The construction is hurting business (which might be inevitable in some cases, not sure here).

2. The lack of elevators, with the acknowledgement that only Astoria Blvd was getting them; and even then, there was skepticism about it (Giannaris said he had been hearing about Astoria Blvd for a long time, but nothing had come from fruition).

3. Lack of notice from the MTA.

I don't really care about 1 or 3, but I still don't understand why they would do renovations and not install elevators at Ditmars, or why it will take them 14 months to do it.

 

 

And when the MTA talks about renovating crumbling stairs, it better not be seriously talking about the street-to-mezzanine stairs; they have all been renovated within the last 4 years:

https://www.amny.com/transit/astoria-subway-station-construction-1.16649961

Quote

 

Shams Tarek, a spokesman for the MTA, said that only one staircase in the Ditmars Avenue station will be closed at a time as crews work to fix crumbling staircases, concrete slabs and support structures. New lighting will be added. The leaky, wooden roof will also be replaced with a new steel structure and new outdoor windscreens will be added. The agency will also renovate and balance platforms to fix gaps between trains and the platforms and make small changes that will improve access.

Staging for the project will require the complete curb space under the Hell Gate Bridge overpass, but it will not block businesses nearby, Tarek said. The project will cost the MTA $22 million, the elected officials said.

“Ditmars Boulevard and the other nearby stations on the N/W line are more than 100 years old, and have not received comprehensive overhauls until now,” Tarek said in a statement. “The longer much-needed repairs are delayed, the longer the repairs will take and the more urgent they will become. The extensive repairs these stations are receiving are essential for public safety — to characterize them as merely cosmetic and unnecessary is absolutely incorrect, and irresponsible.”

 

 

 

And remember, the Enhanced Station Renovation is still a vanity project by Cuomo.

Edited by GojiMet86
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Astoria doesn't want renovated stations, the money should be used elsewhere. Those stations look like garbage. They should be welcoming the renovations with open arms, though I do agree that it's absurd to not have elevators put in.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.