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Elmhurst

Byford planning Twitter sessions to engage with riders

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I think it's a good idea. Now what he needs to do is use that to improve the system. If he simply makes excuses about costs then it's pointless. He needs to not only listen but act and move this system into the 21st century with service levels to match peak and off-peak where possible. 

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At some point, he's actually going to do something, right? I realize he just started in January and Rome wasn't built in a day and perhaps I'm just being impatient, but all of these outreach ideas don't and will not mean much if no effort is made to actually combat some of the problems plaguing the system. While I applaud his efforts, I'm not seeing much action behind them, though that's likely because he's not the one who makes the final decisions here.

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10 hours ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

I think it's a good idea. Now what he needs to do is use that to improve the system. If he simply makes excuses about costs then it's pointless. He needs to not only listen but act and move this system into the 21st century with service levels to match peak and off-peak where possible. 

Remember #MyNYPD?

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31 minutes ago, Lance said:

At some point, he's actually going to do something, right? I realize he just started in January and Rome wasn't built in a day and perhaps I'm just being impatient, but all of these outreach ideas don't and will not mean much if no effort is made to actually combat some of the problems plaguing the system. While I applaud his efforts, I'm not seeing much action behind them, though that's likely because he's not the one who makes the final decisions here.

I wouldn’t be so quick to write him off like this. Just because the changes he’s making aren’t showing publicly doesn’t mean they aren’t taking place. It’ll take time, but I firmly believe that you will see a difference. 

As for this specific subject, I think that one of the MTA’s biggest problems its total insularity. By engaging with the rider public, he may gain a picture of the system that has not been filtered by a zillion subordinates — all of who have their own agendas. 

Edited by RR503
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19 minutes ago, RR503 said:

I wouldn’t be so quick to write him off like this. Just because the changes he’s making aren’t showing publicly doesn’t mean they aren’t taking place. It’ll take time, but I firmly believe that you will see a difference. 

As for this specific subject, I think that one of the MTA’s biggest problems its total insularity. By engaging with the rider public, he may gain a picture of the system that has not been filtered by a zillion subordinates — all of who have their own agendas. 

The issue here is we have a system that is in crisis, and in order to change the public's perception, you need to do something bold to show them that you're trying to get results and looking to deliver to get this mess turned around.  Quite frankly the (MTA) has been sticking with the status quo and that's not good enough.  There needs to be emergency changes made where possible.  Things like scheduling more trains where possible.  Their policy has been to not make such changes without board approval and then implement them months down the line.  That would be something I would be looking at when we talk about bold changes.  Right now the media is having a feast on the (MTA) and there is really nothing being done to stop the bleeding.  They're being painted as an agency that lies, is corrupt and does anything to BS so that they can avoid doing what they should be doing to get this city moving.

This whole situation is very serious.  It's an economic issue and a quality of life issue.  Yesterday I made a quick run to Manhattan to Whole Foods thinking I could be back in two hours tops because I wasn't going very far.  Well that trip was basically double what I estimated.  People are literally changing their commutes daily looking for immediate solutions and relief (I spend at least an hour more commuting per day than I did in years past because of delays, etc., and that's being generous), and they're angry and they should be.  We have politicians who can't make up their minds on things that is negatively impacting our economy, not to mention the amount of lost income and time that New Yorkers are dealing with. We have pending increases in the fare, and a system that shows no signs of improvement.  That is a very tough pill to swallow, not to mention the fares now compete with Uber, Lyft and so on.  

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34 minutes ago, RR503 said:

I wouldn’t be so quick to write him off like this. Just because the changes he’s making aren’t showing publicly doesn’t mean they aren’t taking place. It’ll take time, but I firmly believe that you will see a difference. 

As for this specific subject, I think that one of the MTA’s biggest problems its total insularity. By engaging with the rider public, he may gain a picture of the system that has not been filtered by a zillion subordinates — all of who have their own agendas. 

You're probably right. I'm just tired of the seemingly endless studies, surveys and investigations that lead absolutely nowhere.

5 minutes ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

The issue here is we have a system that is in crisis, and in order to change the public's perception, you need to do something bold to show them that you're trying to get results and looking to deliver to get this mess turned around.  Quite frankly the (MTA) has been sticking with the status quo and that's not good enough.  There needs to be emergency changes made where possible.  Things like scheduling more trains where possible.  Their policy has been to not make such changes without board approval and then implement them months down the line.  That would be something I would be looking at when we talk about bold changes.  Right now the media is having a feast on the (MTA) and there is really nothing being done to stop the bleeding.  They're being painted as an agency that lies, is corrupt and does anything to BS so that they can avoid doing what they should be doing to get this city moving.  

Actually, I can understand why that takes a while to implement. Even removing the board approval part of the process, adding more trains is not a simple matter of just adding a new run to the schedule. I imagine there are a lot of logistical measures happening behind the scenes from putting train crews on these new runs, adjusting the schedule to ensure the new runs don't interfere with existing service and so on and so forth.

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2 minutes ago, Lance said:

You're probably right. I'm just tired of the seemingly endless studies, surveys and investigations that lead absolutely nowhere.

Actually, I can understand why that takes a while to implement. Even removing the board approval part of the process, adding more trains is not a simple matter of just adding a new run to the schedule. I imagine there are a lot of logistical measures happening behind the scenes from putting train crews on these new runs, adjusting the schedule to ensure the new runs don't interfere with existing service and so on and so forth.

I don't disagree, but that's something that still should be looked at to see if it can be streamlined and implemented faster.  If you have a situation where there's daily overcrowding and you address the problem months later, well by then people may have found another way to get around (usually with Uber, Lyft, etc.).

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17 minutes ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

The issue here is we have a system that is in crisis, and in order to change the public's perception, you need to do something bold to show them that you're trying to get results and looking to deliver to get this mess turned around.  Quite frankly the (MTA) has been sticking with the status quo and that's not good enough.  There needs to be emergency changes made where possible.  Things like scheduling more trains where possible.  Their policy has been to not make such changes without board approval and then implement them months down the line.  That would be something I would be looking at when we talk about bold changes.  Right now the media is having a feast on the (MTA) and there is really nothing being done to stop the bleeding.  They're being painted as an agency that lies, is corrupt and does anything to BS so that they can avoid doing what they should be doing to get this city moving.

This whole situation is very serious.  It's an economic issue and a quality of life issue.  Yesterday I made a quick run to Manhattan to Whole Foods thinking I could be back in two hours tops because I wasn't going very far.  Well that trip was basically double what I estimated.  People are literally changing their commutes daily looking for immediate solutions and relief (I spend at least an hour more commuting per day than I did in years past because of delays, etc., and that's being generous), and they're angry and they should be.  We have politicians who can't make up their minds on things that is negatively impacting our economy, not to mention the amount of lost income and time that New Yorkers are dealing with. We have pending increases in the fare, and a system that shows no signs of improvement.  That is a very tough pill to swallow, not to mention the fares now compete with Uber, Lyft and so on.  

You are absolutely right in identifying the problem. That said, I don’t think jerking our knees is at all the solution. Yes, there are small things we can do — and trust me, the agency is looking at them — but the issues that created this crisis run deep, and thus need to be addressed with care. Remember the other times we’ve reacted overly quickly to things? Williamsburg Bridge anyone? To try to fix this crisis with undue speed is to repeat our past mistakes.  

And yes, we absolutely need to avoid analysis paralysis, but keep in mind that the system’s biggest issues — the operating environment ones — have simply never been recognized before, thus they need to be studied before we can do things about them. 

And as for your specific complaint about the long timelines/board review of service increases, they need to be that way. Increases are in essence budget amendments, which by agency regulation must be approved by the board. And their long timelines result not from some agency incompetence, but from the fact that the MTA has to phase them into work schedules during the picks so as to not have zillions of extra board crews running normal service trains. 

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2 minutes ago, RR503 said:

You are absolutely right in identifying the problem. That said, I don’t think jerking our knees is at all the solution. Yes, there are small things we can do — and trust me, the agency is looking at them — but the issues that created this crisis run deep, and thus need to be addressed with care. Remember the other times we’ve reacted overly quickly to things? Williamsburg Bridge anyone? To try to fix this crisis with undue speed is to repeat our past mistakes.  

And yes, we absolutely need to avoid analysis paralysis, but keep in mind that the system’s biggest issues — the operating environment ones — have simply never been recognized before, thus they need to be studied before we can do things about them. 

And as for your specific complaint about the long timelines/board review of service increases, they need to be that way. Increases are in essence budget amendments, which by agency regulation must be approved by the board. And their long timelines result not from some agency incompetence, but from the fact that the MTA has to phase them into work schedules during the picks so as to not have zillions of extra board crews running normal service trains. 

Right, but is there a faster way that such changes can be implemented?  That's what I mean when I say not doing business as usual.  There have been a few instances where changes were implemented on the bus end without the usual long waits. Surely this could be examined on the subway end.

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43 minutes ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

Right, but is there a faster way that such changes can be implemented?  That's what I mean when I say not doing business as usual.  There have been a few instances where changes were implemented on the bus end without the usual long waits. Surely this could be examined on the subway end.

I mean yes there is a way, but that’d require the restructuring of union/RTO work policy. You’d either have to do staggered picks, where different jobs come up at different times, or just have more picks, so there are more opportunities to increase service. Both of those changes would be opposed by the union, as they’d limit flexibility, and add more points of disruption. I reckon management too wouldn’t love these — especially the second alternative — as changing people’s work patterns frequently further erodes their circadian rhythms, creating fatigue and therefore safety issues. 

Again, not saying it isn’t possible, just saying that this may not be the best thing to pursue. 

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1 hour ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

I don't disagree, but that's something that still should be looked at to see if it can be streamlined and implemented faster.  If you have a situation where there's daily overcrowding and you address the problem months later, well by then people may have found another way to get around (usually with Uber, Lyft, etc.).

They may very well be looking at it; I'd imagine the pace of change would be a lot slower if you had to press release every decision being made. The absence of an announcement is not indicative of the absence of action.

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Just now, bobtehpanda said:

They may very well be looking at it; I'd imagine the pace of change would be a lot slower if you had to press release every decision being made. The absence of an announcement is not indicative of the absence of action.

Yes, but we both know that the (MTA) needs something that the public can see to give them any credibility at this point, so having more frequent press releases with some real news isn't such a terrible idea.

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11 hours ago, kosciusko said:

Cool, now I can tweet at him when I'm being held between stations for 20+ minutes.

He & whoever else that's going to partake in this, had better be prepared for a litany of those types of complaints.....

3 hours ago, Lance said:

At some point, he's actually going to do something, right? I realize he just started in January and Rome wasn't built in a day and perhaps I'm just being impatient, but all of these outreach ideas don't and will not mean much if no effort is made to actually combat some of the problems plaguing the system. While I applaud his efforts, I'm not seeing much action behind them, though that's likely because he's not the one who makes the final decisions here.

IDK, I can't even chalk up my sentiments to being that of impatience anymore....

My mindset on the matter is more.... well.... (An) expectance of inaction (with no shortage of chatter to fill the void) being par for the course & if any actual rectification of the issues that plagues mass transit in this city actually starts taking place, then I'll be moved one way or the other - figuratively & literally....

Speaking of people not being moved, you don't have to look much further than the LIRR twitter page..... Commuting constraints galore!

3 hours ago, Deucey said:

Remember #MyNYPD?

That's the first thing that came to mind when I read the thread title here......

3 hours ago, RR503 said:

I wouldn’t be so quick to write him off like this. Just because the changes he’s making aren’t showing publicly doesn’t mean they aren’t taking place. It’ll take time, but I firmly believe that you will see a difference. 

As for this specific subject, I think that one of the MTA’s biggest problems its total insularity. By engaging with the rider public, he may gain a picture of the system that has not been filtered by a zillion subordinates — all of who have their own agendas. 

Yeah, he's got to do something real asinine for me to write him off..... Planning twitter sessions doesn't come remotely close to that.....

I'll give the thing a gander & await the bevy of *this is how late you made me* tweets that it's going to be bombarded with......

 

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32 minutes ago, B35 via Church said:

That's the first thing that came to mind when I read the thread title here......

AND Gothamist is coming back too???

Yeah, #TellMTA is really gonna be something wonderful...giphy.gif

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3 hours ago, B35 via Church said:

He & whoever else that's going to partake in this, had better be prepared for a litany of those types of complaints.....

How much do you want to bet something like the IND going to shit happens during the twitter session? 

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47 minutes ago, Around the Horn said:

How much do you want to bet something like the IND going to shit happens during the twitter session? 

Gimme a line on (L) shutting down at Bedford during rush hour right before the Twitter session 

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2 hours ago, Around the Horn said:

How much do you want to bet something like the IND going to shit happens during the twitter session? 

Someone might ask Mr. Byford, "Where's the R train?" or they might say "Fix the freakin R".

Edited by Elmhurst
Grammar correction

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3 minutes ago, LGA Link N train said:

THE (R) TRAIN SUCKS!!!!!!
 

#FIX THE (R)

Can we #fixNYCTF and disable large font? 

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