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Deucey

MTA: we just do stupid stuff so we don't get fired...

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http://gothamist.com/2018/04/26/leave_only_footprints.php

The MTA Painted A Subway Platform During Rush Hour & You'll Never Guess What Happened

BY BEN YAKAS IN ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTON APR 26, 2018 9:25 AM

 

Like a dysfunctional democracy running on fumes in the year 2018, our subway is a complex system with myriad antiquated moving parts that probably should have been replaced years ago. The fact that it even works at all, and that most of the 5.6 million daily rides unfold without incident, is still a modern miracle, and we should all take a moment to appreciate the hard work done by transit workers to keep things moving despite all the crumbling infrastructure.

Having said that, there are moments that perfectly encapsulate the MTA's seemingly limitless capacity for snafu. And one such moment occurred on Wednesday this week, when straphanger Josh Boerman spotted a transit worker finishing up putting a fresh coat of yellow paint on the edge of the Rockaway Ave C train station in Bed-Stuy. "I was a bit baffled as to what I was seeing, so I bent down and touched the paint to see if perhaps it was at least tacky," he told us. "But it was completely wet and at that point I was like, 'Oh this is gonna be good.'"

"Everyone else on the platform was doing that passive confusion/resignation thing that is now endemic to how we treat our experience on the subway these days," said Boerman, a theater director and designer, who was on his way to work in Manhattan. "We have kind of accepted the absurdity as our lot in life."

Can you guess what happened next? You can probably guess what happened next.

"I very nearly stepped onto the strip as I boarded the train, even with the full knowledge that it was wet," Boerman said. He wasn't surprised that people tracked it into the car: "By the time they noticed, it was too late and they didn't want to draw attention to it. Kind of like when you step in dogshit."

The painting wasn't just taking place at Rockaway Ave. that morning—Boerman also spotted it being done at Ralph Ave., the next stop on the line. They had ensured that even more work would be necessary to clean up the mess.

Boerman is resigned to the idea the MTA would schedule this kind of maintenance work in the middle of the rush hour commute on a weekday—let alone a soggy morning during which there already had been several delays on various lines. He saw the whole incident as a metaphor for the MTA's mismanagement.

I think the most unfortunate thing is that I wasn't really surprised. The MTA, especially the subway and particularly post-Sandy, has been characterized by a culture of abdicating responsibility. When you've got a governor at the head of the organization who's happy to pilfer money from the transit authority to fund upstate ski resorts, it naturally follows that you'll see similar mismanagement on down the chain of command

There's this complete institutional inability to see how decisions made will have future effects. In this case, the hundreds of dollars that the MTA presumably saved by choosing to not pay late night/early morning wages to their workers will now be handily eclipsed by the thousands of dollars they'll need to pay to scrub dozens, possibly hundreds, of paint-stained subway car floors

Whereas if people were encouraged to take responsibility, someone along the line might have said, 'hey, maybe let's not lay down fresh paint during rush hour.' Take this one anecdote, write it large, and it's not hard to see how we're left with a subway underfunded by billions, running on half-century old rolling stock that is constantly breaking down.

It remains a mystery why the platform was painted at this time. We reached out to the MTA for comment, and will update if they respond.

  • LMAO! 1

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I've actually been on a few (C) trains with yellow footprints on the floor and thought they came from those new yellow thingys they put down with the arrows.  In fact I saw the footprints last night on the (C) I was on coming Downtown.  The train I was on stunk like hell too (just smelled like @ss and horrible body odor in an enclosed space).  It was so bad that I got off at 145th and went to another car. Didn't make a difference. I kept looking around to see if there were any homeless people because the stench was ridiculous.  They clearly don't mop and clean these trains very often, that's for sure, despite what they say in the news.  This was one of the newer cars too, but it was rather filthy.

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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This is something that should have been done during G.O.s where all trains run express or something. They should be able to integrate service changes with station/elevator work, etc.

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4 hours ago, Around the Horn said:

Well at least they saved money on those floor stickers... the people made the arrows themselves :lol:

Yeah, but now they have to scrub those trains down to remove the yellow paint that was tracked everywhere, thus wasting more money.

2 hours ago, N6 Limited said:

This is something that should have been done during G.O.s where all trains run express or something. They should be able to integrate service changes with station/elevator work, etc.

You would think that, especially since local service on Fulton St has been suspended in one direction or the other for the past few weeks. There's general ineptitude and then there's the MTA. Well, at least they're leading the way in something...

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It's not a bug, it's a feature. The wet paint is to soil and shame the shoes of those who toe too close to the platform edge. 

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The fact that they're repainting non-ADA compliant platform edges - instead of replacing with tactile strips as they should have done years ago - is the really idiotic part of this.

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20 minutes ago, officiallyliam said:

The fact that they're repainting non-ADA compliant platform edges - instead of replacing with tactile strips as they should have done years ago - is the really idiotic part of this.

Nah, it’s really that they did it when people were using the station to board and alight trains.

The painting instead of tactile strips is typical (MTA) choosing to do something instead of doing the right thing because of not wanting to spend money.

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