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Union Tpke

Watered down Freedom Ticket

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If this included Flushing, I would take it in a heartbeat. The LIRR would most definitely beat my other options:

  • (7)(E)(R)(Q)
  • (7)(E) (→ (M)) → (B)(Q)
  • (7)(E) (→ (M)) → (D)
  • (7)(F)(N)
  • (7)(F)(Q) (→ (N))
  • (7)(F)(Q)(B)(Q)
  • (7)(F)(B)(Q)
  • (7)(F)(D) (→ (N))
  • (7)(N)
  • (7)(W)(Q)
  • LIRR → (A)(C)(E)(B)(Q)
  • LIRR → (A)(C)(E)(D)

I’m pretty opportunistic. If there is a train across the platform that I think will save me a minute, I’m transferring (after looking for the green light, of course).

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This is fantastic, and fits with that long talked about plan to turn Jamaica <-> Atlantic into a shuttle. I will definitely be partaking of this study. Although the lack of eTix is annoying 

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I'm ready to switch to Atlantic Terminal if necessary since the Hempstead train usually goes there anyway.

From what I see, It looks like they're trying to use existing capacity on the Atlantic Branch first so they won't have to adjust service levels, then determine if people switch because Atlantic is cheaper (like during the "summer of hell"). This way they can determine if they'll have two tiers of freedom tickets, one for Atlantic only at a cheaper price, and one for Penn.

Then, they want to see how many riders they gain, and how many switch to the cheaper ticket before they determine pricing for the one to Penn and the inclusion of the Port Washington Branch.

1 hour ago, QM1to6Ave said:

This is fantastic, and fits with that long talked about plan to turn Jamaica <-> Atlantic into a shuttle. I will definitely be partaking of this study. Although the lack of eTix is annoying 

I think the lack of eTix is to make it easier for the conductors to identify the tickets and for the LIRR to monitor the sales numbers from the ticket machines ( see which stations get the most sales and if there is a switch over of ticket types purchased, etc)

The thing about the Jamaica-Atlantic Shuttle, is that they're planning for it to use a separate platform, how will that affect connections?

 

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Hope this gets ridden -- will be the determiner as to whether the rest of the city gets similar treatment. It's time we had it. 

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Another interesting thing is that those stations are served mostly by Far Rockaway and Hempstead trains which generally have Atlantic as the western terminal. So they're trying to see if they can fill seats but keep the riders from transferring in Jamaica. 

Once you start riding the railroad you get used to it, and the bus/subway combo is like a last resort. I wonder if they'll see new riders change from the freedom ticket to regular penn station tickets

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If they use those flimsy MetroCard paper as passes, good luck. I only use my Metro-North pass for the railroad. I keep a seperate Metrocard for riding the express bus, subway, etc.

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Wait, it says the Weekly LIRR pass will be on one side and a Weekly NYCT pass on the other, but it doesn't mention anything about a NYCT transfer on the one way pass. 

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9 hours ago, N6 Limited said:

Wait, it says the Weekly LIRR pass will be on one side and a Weekly NYCT pass on the other, but it doesn't mention anything about a NYCT transfer on the one way pass. 

You mean a transfer from the LIRR to the subway/bus built in to the $5.00 fare? It doesn't seem like that will be part of it. 

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4 hours ago, QM1to6Ave said:

You mean a transfer from the LIRR to the subway/bus built in to the $5.00 fare? It doesn't seem like that will be part of it. 

Yeah, I thought that was supposed to be part of it, but I guess it's easier to leave it out and charge an even $5. 

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3 hours ago, N6 Limited said:

Yeah, I thought that was supposed to be part of it, but I guess it's easier to leave it out and charge an even $5. 

I think this way they also deter you from transferring to the subway unnecessarily.  I imagine they are trying to see if they can reduce subway usage and transfer those passengers to LIRR instead. 

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Perhaps some express bus customers from places like Rosedale will avail themselves of this option.  May save the MTA money too as it's cheaper than running express buses.

Can't see most others taking advantage of this.  $60*4 = $240 for 28 days.  That's double the 30-day Metrocard price.  Most of the folk at Parsons-Archer can't even afford that. 

Best way to encourage ridership is to accept Unlimited Metrocard for these LIRR stations, but only on OFF-PEAK trains.  Capacity is an issue for many peak trains.

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4 minutes ago, RtrainBlues said:

Perhaps some express bus customers from places like Rosedale will avail themselves of this option.  May save the MTA money too as it's cheaper than running express buses.

Can't see most others taking advantage of this.  $60*4 = $240 for 28 days.  That's double the 30-day Metrocard price.  Most of the folk at Parsons-Archer can't even afford that. 

 Best way to encourage ridership is to accept Unlimited Metrocard for these LIRR stations, but only on OFF-PEAK trains.  Capacity is an issue for many peak trains.

Yeah the price is a bit high. A shame -- the originally quoted price was to be $215 for a monthly, which may have put it just in reach of commuters from that area. 

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25 minutes ago, RR503 said:

Yeah the price is a bit high. A shame -- the originally quoted price was to be $215 for a monthly, which may have put it just in reach of commuters from that area. 

 

30 minutes ago, RtrainBlues said:

Perhaps some express bus customers from places like Rosedale will avail themselves of this option.  May save the MTA money too as it's cheaper than running express buses.

Can't see most others taking advantage of this.  $60*4 = $240 for 28 days.  That's double the 30-day Metrocard price.  Most of the folk at Parsons-Archer can't even afford that. 

Best way to encourage ridership is to accept Unlimited Metrocard for these LIRR stations, but only on OFF-PEAK trains.  Capacity is an issue for many peak trains.

I'm sorry but I think the price is right.  If these people really want a faster commute, they'll find the extra money for it, otherwise there's the local bus to the subway. I'm not trying to be harsh, but let's be real here.  You want these people to have commutes that are basically halved and pay NOTHING for it.  That's not being realistic at all. Meanwhile this pilot is ONLY for select parts of Queens.  I guess Little Neck, Douglaston, Bayside and other areas of Northeast Queens don't need a break in the fares?? If they're going to do this pilot it should apply to ALL of Queens.  Forest Hills, Kew Gardens, Woodside, etc. If the politicians that keep yelling about how their neighborhoods receive such poor service hate it so much they can find ways to allocate more funding for the LIRR to decrease the fares further, but they won't do that. They want the (MTA) to essentially give more service on their dime.  That's absurd.  There's being reasonable and there's being GREEDY.

Additionally, those who ride the express bus should not have their service compromised in Queens.  I get so tired of people talking about how expensive it is to run express buses, as if those LIRR trains don't have deadheading and high overhead.  Please. If you're going to complain about costs, do it across the board, otherwise it comes across as being extremely ignorant and anti-bus.  The Queens express buses from Southeast Queens serve completely different areas than the LIRR does. That's the other thing people seem to forget.  Getting to Penn Station is a trek if you work in East Midtown. You're better off sticking with the express bus.

Only select parts of Queens DON'T use the LIRR.  Little Neck and Douglaston residents use their stations and thus receive very good service.  It's very simple. You either use it or you don't.  Their fares are the same as those in Southeast Queens and they manage to find the extra money.

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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6 minutes ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

I'm sorry but I think the price is right.  If these people really want a faster commute, they'll find the extra money for it, otherwise there's the local bus to the subway. I'm not trying to be harsh, but let's be real here.  You want these people to have commutes that are basically halved and pay NOTHING for it.  That's not being realistic at all. Meanwhile this pilot is ONLY for select parts of Queens.  I guess Little Neck, Douglaston, Bayside and other areas of Northeast Queens don't need a break in the fares?? If they're going to do this pilot it should apply to ALL of Queens.  Forest Hills, Kew Gardens, Woodside, etc. If the politicians that keep yelling about how their neighborhoods receive such poor service hate it so much they can find ways to allocate more funding for the LIRR to decrease the fares further, but they won't do that. They want the (MTA) to essentially give more service on their dime.  That's absurd.  There's being reasonable and there's being GREEDY.

The idea that we should have some kind of "tiered" transit system based on payment needs to die out. Yes, people get a much faster commute - so would you propose a premium charge on express subway lines, which could also half someone's commute time? Bear in mind, also, that the pilot as it stands is taking people only to Atlantic Terminal, which is not a final destination for a majority of commuters; without transfers to subways available in the pilot, most people's commutes to Manhattan will actually cost $7.75. We all live in the same city, and the better-quality transport should not be available only to those who can pay more. Many workers who drive the city economy, but don't make much money, stand to benefit significantly from better commutes - why should they be ignored just to preserve the ideal that commuter trains are a premium service for the affluent? Transit capacity is transit capacity, and we should be using that capacity to get any New Yorkers around, regardless of their income.

I agree with you about expanding to the rest of Queens; the LIRR cites capacity problems at Penn relating mostly to ESA testing and Harold work as being the reasons the Freedom Ticket only includes Atlantic Terminal. They could at least have included Hunterspoint/LIC, though.

12 minutes ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

I get so tired of people talking about how expensive it is to run express buses, as if those LIRR trains don't have deadheading and high overhead.  Please. If you're going to complain about cost, do it across the board. 

We should be complaining about costs across the board - that means questioning why some modes of transport in this city have vastly higher subsidies than others. This would include both commuter rail services - for which getting city riders on board as part of the Freedom Ticket will actually reduce off-peak running costs - as well as express buses.

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26 minutes ago, officiallyliam said:

The idea that we should have some kind of "tiered" transit system based on payment needs to die out. Yes, people get a much faster commute - so would you propose a premium charge on express subway lines, which could also half someone's commute time? Bear in mind, also, that the pilot as it stands is taking people only to Atlantic Terminal, which is not a final destination for a majority of commuters; without transfers to subways available in the pilot, most people's commutes to Manhattan will actually cost $7.75. We all live in the same city, and the better-quality transport should not be available only to those who can pay more. Many workers who drive the city economy, but don't make much money, stand to benefit significantly from better commutes - why should they be ignored just to preserve the ideal that commuter trains are a premium service for the affluent? Transit capacity is transit capacity, and we should be using that capacity to get any New Yorkers around, regardless of their income.

I agree with you about expanding to the rest of Queens; the LIRR cites capacity problems at Penn relating mostly to ESA testing and Harold work as being the reasons the Freedom Ticket only includes Atlantic Terminal. They could at least have included Hunterspoint/LIC, though.

We should be complaining about costs across the board - that means questioning why some modes of transport in this city have vastly higher subsidies than others. This would include both commuter rail services - for which getting city riders on board as part of the Freedom Ticket will actually reduce off-peak running costs - as well as express buses.

I don't see tiered services going anywhere in this City because workers' salaries will continue to go up, and so those salaries have to be paid for.  It's that simple.  You have to remember that the express buses were created to provide residents that lived in two fare zones with a faster commute for a slightly higher fare, so they've always paid more.  That's what comes with living further out.  These people understand the deal. They live far out for a reason.   If they really can't afford a bit more to commute, they should consider moving to somewhere cheaper.  Just being honest.  

Some places that are further out aren't that much cheaper than Manhattan when you look at the transportation expenses so it depends.  That is the case for areas like Douglaston, Little Neck and other parts of Queens like Forest Hills Gardens.  

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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1 hour ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

Meanwhile this pilot is ONLY for select parts of Queens.  I guess Little Neck, Douglaston, Bayside and other areas of Northeast Queens don't need a break in the fares?? If they're going to do this pilot it should apply to ALL of Queens.  Forest Hills, Kew Gardens, Woodside, etc.

This pilot is only to Atlantic Terminal and you can't get from the locations you've mentioned without double or tripling back.

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11 hours ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

That's what comes with living further out.  These people understand the deal. They live far out for a reason.   If they really can't afford a bit more to commute, they should consider moving to somewhere cheaper.  Just being honest.  

Not everyone who lives far outside of the city center is doing so because they don't mind paying extra for transportation. More common in today's city is people moving to far reaches of the outer boroughs because housing in Manhattan, and just about everywhere in close proximity to Manhattan, is priced absurdly high. What do you suggest for low-income people who have jobs in the city but can't afford to live anywhere near it - they too should have to cough up for express buses or commuter rail as punishment for not having the means to live near affordable transportation?  This is something the Freedom Ticket should be trying to solve, but charging $5 without transfers at low-frequency stations is not doing enough.

11 hours ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

You have to remember that the express buses were created to provide residents that lived in two fare zones with a faster commute for a slightly higher fare, so they've always paid more. 

Yes, that is true; express buses are a lifeline for many communities who aren't in close proximity to subway lines. But many have absurdly low ridership and only two routes have more than one million annual riders, and this is what contributes to the extremely high operational cost of express buses. I think that there is a role for express buses in the greater transport network, but there's definitely fat that can and should be trimmed.

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1 hour ago, officiallyliam said:

1. Not everyone who lives far outside of the city center is doing so because they don't mind paying extra for transportation. More common in today's city is people moving to far reaches of the outer boroughs because housing in Manhattan, and just about everywhere in close proximity to Manhattan, is priced absurdly high. What do you suggest for low-income people who have jobs in the city but can't afford to live anywhere near it - they too should have to cough up for express buses or commuter rail as punishment for not having the means to live near affordable transportation?  This is something the Freedom Ticket should be trying to solve, but charging $5 without transfers at low-frequency stations is not doing enough.

2. Yes, that is true; express buses are a lifeline for many communities who aren't in close proximity to subway lines. But many have absurdly low ridership and only two routes have more than one million annual riders, and this is what contributes to the extremely high operational cost of express buses. I think that there is a role for express buses in the greater transport network, but there's definitely fat that can and should be trimmed.

1. It has nothing to with punishment. It's a very simple thing.  The further away you move from jobs, the more expensive transportation becomes.  There's really no way around it.  These people have the option of taking the cheaper bus to subway arrangement, which is $2.75 or less if they have a 30 day pass, or they can pay $5.00 one way for the LIRR, which quite frankly may not seem like much savings, but these days you can't much with $5.00 anymore.  Even my coffee is over $5.00 when I give a tip.  My cortado was $5.10 this morning with the $1 tip.

Maybe you can get something at McDonald's for that?  What they should have though is a monthly pass, which I don't believe is an option that the (MTA) originally was supposed to have, so on that end they essentially suckered out of what they said they would do.  However, let's say that you buy a $60.00 pass for 4 weeks and a monthly Metrocard at $121.00.  That's $361.00 for the month.  That's still a significant savings in comparison to what I pay some months with my Metro-North monthly pass AND my express bus pass which combined is $446.00, so that's a savings of $85.00 a month for them.

2. That's saying a lot when express buses only have 57 seats and many lines only run hourly service off-peak or every 30 minutes tops.  There is much "fat" to trim despite what you may think.  There are also other factors as to why ridership may be "absurdly low".  If my bus only comes once an hour and it's consistently late, well guess what? If I can find another way to get around, I may just consider another alternative.  Express buses are suffering the same thing that regular buses citywide are suffering from. They aren't running on time, trips are taking A LOT longer and they come bunched up at times, even lines with 30 minute headways, so with that said, it would be interesting to see what you would propose cutting since you seem to think there's so much service to trim.

This is essentially the same issue that these areas of Queens are facing in that the LIRR service isn't that frequent, thus there's a lack of accessibility. 

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2 hours ago, officiallyliam said:

Not everyone who lives far outside of the city center is doing so because they don't mind paying extra for transportation. More common in today's city is people moving to far reaches of the outer boroughs because housing in Manhattan, and just about everywhere in close proximity to Manhattan, is priced absurdly high. What do you suggest for low-income people who have jobs in the city but can't afford to live anywhere near it - they too should have to cough up for express buses or commuter rail as punishment for not having the means to live near affordable transportation?  This is something the Freedom Ticket should be trying to solve, but charging $5 without transfers at low-frequency stations is not doing enough.

Yes, that is true; express buses are a lifeline for many communities who aren't in close proximity to subway lines. But many have absurdly low ridership and only two routes have more than one million annual riders, and this is what contributes to the extremely high operational cost of express buses. I think that there is a role for express buses in the greater transport network, but there's definitely fat that can and should be trimmed.

Those low-income residents can take advantage of the City Ticket during the weekends for a fast and cheap ride into the city, or just take the LIRR over to Woodside catch the subway from there. I don't see how the LIRR can reasonably increase service in Queens without lengthening the platforms at Hollis, Forest Hills, Kew Gardens, and other stops or increasing service on the Hempstead and Long Beach branches. Long Islanders don't want the Main Line or the Babylon Branch to make stops in Queens except for Jamaica because it will make their commute even longer. Keep in mind that it takes roughly a 40 minute to over an hour in some cases to travel from Manhattan over to the suburbs on the railroad, or over three hours total from Jamaica to somewhere out east like Montauk.

There are plenty of suburbanites living in Nassau west of Mineola who aren't well off, don't live close to the subway, and yet take advantage of the various deals the LIRR currently offers to people using the rails or the few private express buses still operating service to/from Manhattan. I've even seen folks ride the n6 at 4 or 5 in the morning to take advantage of the light traffic for a fast 30minute ride into the subway to work if they don't live near the LIRR. The biggest problem with the city is that many of its residents don't want to change their traveling habits, or want a faster commute into the city that doesn't involve the MTA in anyway shape or form.

Edited by NY1635
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1 hour ago, NY1635 said:

Those low-income residents can take advantage of the City Ticket during the weekends for a fast and cheap ride into the city, or just take the LIRR over to Woodside catch the subway from there. I don't see how the LIRR can reasonably increase service in Queens without lengthening the platforms at Hollis, Forest Hills, Kew Gardens, and other stops or increasing service on the Hempstead and Long Beach branches. Long Islanders don't want the Main Line or the Babylon Branch to make stops in Queens except for Jamaica because it will make their commute even longer. Keep in mind that it takes roughly a 40 minute to over an hour in some cases to travel from Manhattan over to the suburbs on the railroad, or over three hours total from Jamaica to somewhere out east like Montauk.

There are plenty of suburbanites living in Nassau west of Mineola who aren't well off, don't live close to the subway, and yet take advantage of the various deals the LIRR currently offers to people using the rails or the few private express buses still operating service to/from Manhattan. I've even seen folks ride the n6 at 4 or 5 in the morning to take advantage of the light traffic for a fast 30minute ride into the subway to work if they don't live near the LIRR. The biggest problem with the city is that many of its residents don't want to change their traveling habits, or want a faster commute into the city that doesn't involve the MTA in anyway shape or form.

City Ticket is only $4.25 on weekends.  I should also point out that Metro-North runs through some of the poorest neighborhoods in the Bronx, not only in NYC, but in the country, such as Morris Heights, University Heights, Tremont and Melrose, where incomes are just $25,000 - 30,000 on average, and I'm being generous with these parameters.  Lots of people from these neighborhoods take advantage of City Ticket on weekends (with no transfers) or they pay $3.00 for intermediate fares from the South Bronx up to places like Yonkers or Mount Vernon.  

Below I've listed the median incomes for the Queens neighborhoods involved in this pilot program:

Queens Village: ~$72,000

Hollis: ~$73,000

St. Albans: ~$71,000

Rosedale: ~$83,000

Locust Manor: ~$60,000

Jamaica: ~$54,000

East New York: ~$37,000

Rosedale is clearly NOT poor, and would be considered a solid middle to upper middle class neighborhood.  The only neighborhood on this list that's actually poor is East New York, and only three neighborhoods have median incomes that fall under the New York median income average (which is around $62,000).  

Let's compare the median incomes areas of Northeast Queens that see good to high usage of their LIRR stations:

Douglaston: ~$87,000

Little Neck: ~$94,000

Bayside: ~$79,000

These numbers indicate that clearly some folks prioritize their transportation over other things. 

In the Bronx by comparison, you could make a much more stronger case for economics being a huge reason for the difference in ridership from areas of the West Bronx that are truly poor:

University Heights: ~$29,000

Morris Heights: ~$25,000

By comparison, the Spuyten Duyvil and Riverdale stations see much more usage, but generally speaking, median income levels are well over three times more than Morris Heights and University Heights.  Of course some of these neighborhoods have pockets of areas with incomes well over $150,000 as is the case in Fieldston (Riverdale), with incomes over $175,000, or in Douglaston with incomes over $120,000.

Riverdale: ~$91,000

 

 

 

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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The board meeting is tomorrow morning, if they approve the Atlantic Field Study, how quickly do you think they can/will get it started? (The document says 'as early as June 2018, but since there is no monthly ticket [in the study] the program can start any day during the month [and not necessarily June either].) 

 

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http://www.mta.info/press-release/mta-headquarters/mta-announces-brooklyn-queens-lirr-fare-and-ticketing-field-study

 

Quote

MTA Announces Brooklyn-Queens LIRR Fare and Ticketing Field Study

By Introducing New “Atlantic Ticket,” Agency Seeks to Determine if Lower LIRR Fares Influence Ridership Habits and Operations of LIRR, Subways, Buses

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) today announced that starting on June 6 it will introduce “Atlantic Ticket” field study, which will offer discounted Long Island Rail Road fares for customers traveling between Brooklyn and seven stations in Queens on a temporary basis. The study will be designed to measure what impact the lower fare will have on ridership on the LIRR and New York City subways and buses.

The study is being conducted for travel to and from Atlantic Terminal, Brooklyn, where the LIRR has more seating capacity on existing trains than it does on trains to Penn Station. It applies to seven stations in Queens that are listed below and offer service to and from Brooklyn and where customers often use bus service provided by the MTA. Customers at eligible stations can board either Atlantic Terminal-bound trains (or Penn-bound trains and transfer to an Atlantic Terminal-bound train at Jamaica). The Atlantic Ticket field study builds upon a program first proposed by the New York City Transit Riders Council. 

“Many of our customers from eastern and southeastern Queens live near enough to the LIRR to use it regularly, but because of our existing fare structure they’ve historically chosen to commute using a combination of MTA subways and buses,” said MTA Chairman Joseph Lhota. “This study will let us gauge whether lowering LIRR fares has an effect on ridership of the LIRR, subway and express buses. We also want to see how the policy change affects existing LIRR operations.”

Andrew Albert, MTA Board Member and Chair of the New York City Transit Riders Council said: “I am extremely gratified that our proposal is being given a thorough and well publicized test for southeast Queens and Brooklyn. We believe this will change travel patterns and give people a lot more of their personal time back at a reasonable rate.  It may also reduce overcrowding on several overcrowded subway lines.”

Under the study, the fare for a one-way LIRR ticket between Brooklyn and the seven Queens stations will be $5.00, a reduction of 51% from the current peak fare of $10.25, and a reduction of 33% from the current off-peak fare of $7.50.

The combined one-way fare covering the LIRR and NYC Transit portions of a trip will be $7.75 ($5 for the LIRR Atlantic Ticket and $2.75 for NYC Transit pay-per-ride fare). “This one-way fare is intended to attract customers traveling occasionally, or interested in trying out LIRR before purchasing the weekly pass,” Chairman Lhota said.

For commuters interested in more frequent travel on LIRR, the MTA will also offer a $60.00 joint weekly unlimited-ride ticket valid for LIRR travel between the selected stations and transfers to NYC subways and buses. (This amount is almost the same as the $59.50 current express bus weekly unlimited fare, which also offers unlimited trips on subways or local buses.)

Compared to the current fares in Southeast Queens, the special $60 weekly ticket will offer a 42.5% discount over the combined current two-system fare of $104.25.

The 10 LIRR stations listed below are covered under the field study. The stations with convenient subway connections are noted below.

Brooklyn

Atlantic Terminal 

East New York  at Atlantic Av

Nostrand Avenue 

Queens

Hollis

Jamaica 

Laurelton

Locust Manor

Queens Village

Rosedale

Albans

Customers can purchase the discounted LIRR tickets at ticket machines or from ticket sales offices and will have the option to add a $5.50 New York City Transit fare to their one way or round trip tickets. The tickets for this field study will not be available via the MTA’s eTix app.

The tickets offered in this field study will also not be available for purchase from conductors on board trains. Customers requesting tickets on board trains will be charged the existing higher on board sales rates: $16 for a peak-hour one-way rail-only ticket, or $14 for an off-peak one-way rail-only ticket. Weekly tickets are not sold aboard trains.

The $60 weekly tickets, like current LIRR weekly tickets, will be valid from 12:01 a.m. every Saturday through midnight on the following Friday for travel on LIRR and valid for 7 days after first swipe for travel on local buses and subway. The $5.00 one-way ticket, like the current CityTicket, will be valid on the day of purchase only.

From Hollis, Laurelton, Locust Manor, Queens Village, Rosedale and St. Albans, the LIRR offers rush hour service roughly every 20 minutes and hourly off-peak service. Off-peak trains serve Brooklyn stations directly. For some peak-hour trains, customers will need to change trains at Jamaica.

Between Brooklyn and Jamaica, the LIRR offers direct rush hour service of roughly every 10 minutes, and off-peak service every 30 minutes.

As part of the metrics it evaluates, the MTA will seek to evaluate whether existing LIRR customers who travel to Penn Station will switch their travel to Atlantic Terminal. The LIRR last offered discounts to Atlantic Terminal in summer 2017, when service to Penn Station was affected by track reconstruction work being conducted by Amtrak.

 

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That $60.00 unlimited is perfect for me. I wonder if I'll be able to buy a bunch of them during the study to save and use after the study ends. 

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