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Via Garibaldi 8

MTA Fare, Toll Hike Won't Take Effect in March as Scheduled Amid L Train, Benchmark Questions

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MTA Fare, Toll Hike Won't Take Effect in March as Scheduled Amid L Train, Benchmark Questions

By Andrew Siff

Published Jan 24, 2019 at 5:29 AM | Updated 2 minutes ago

https://gcdn.2mdn.net/videoplayback/id/9c7876f23b41bba0/itag/342/source/doubleclick_dmm/ctier/L/acao/yes/ip/0.0.0.0/ipbits/0/expire/3689672715/sparams/id,itag,source,ctier,acao,ip,ipbits,expire/signature/982011F58E0F3B1C3E02E8C1BD566A6887356891.8D4E4F714845F6C86EC00704ABDC85ABE5AEC6D4/key/ck2/file/file.mp4

The MTA's latest fare hike won't take effect in March as scheduled amid L train and benchmark questions that prompted the Board to delay a vote on the hike breakdown Thursday. 

The agency was expected to vote on the structure of the hike -- whether there should be a base fare increase or elimination of the bonus -- but the MTA's Acting Chairman Fernando Ferrer approved a motion to table the vote until February.

The hike would have gone into effect in March if the vote had taken place and approved it, but it will now be delayed, Ferrer noted. The timing of a new potential hike was unclear as of Thursday. 

Transit sources told News 4 that uncertainty over the L train, as well as a last-minute proposal by a board member to have no fare increase unless the MTA meets certain benchmarks, compelled the board to delay the vote. 

  • The MTA has postponed its planned vote on how to break down the looming subway and bus fare hike until next month
  • The agency was expected to vote on the structure of the hike, but its Acting Chairman approved a motion to table the vote until February
  • The hike would have gone into effect in March if the vote had taken place and approved it

Board members were planning to weigh three different options during the vote. The first option -- raise the base fare to $3 and keep a 10 percent bonus for buying monthly MetroCards. The second -- keep the base fare at $2.75, but eliminate the bonus. The third choice is one that commuters may like the best -- no fare hike unless the MTA meets certain performance goals.

If the board ultimately chooses the latter option, it could trigger a two-week holding pattern and more public hearings would be held before any vote takes place. The fare hike had been set to take effect in March. 

On Tuesday, MTA committee members were met with an earful from riders imploring them not to approve the long-planned fare hike, something commuters have been dreading.

In a statement, the MTA said its "board will have a robust discussion and decide on the best course of action in the context of the MTA's dire financial position, which requires fare and toll increases as well as new, sustainable, adequate sources of funding in order to balance the budget while avoiding painful service cuts."

The MTA approved a $17 billion budget for 2019 last December that assumes a series of broad fare hikes.

https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/MTA-Fare-Hike-Vote-504793171.html?akmobile=o&fbclid=IwAR1wUCrlr5T756v4bJpM9jta1TrcGOPFmaIpGOZgmQCX9XVWA-rbrU48cMs

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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The third choice is one that commuters may like the best -- no fare hike unless the MTA meets certain performance goals.

Wouldn't that be interesting.

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1 hour ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

Transit sources told News 4 that uncertainty over the L train, as well as a last-minute proposal by a board member to have no fare increase unless the MTA meets certain benchmarks, compelled the board to delay the vote. 

This is a patently terrible idea. If you thought they didn’t have incentive to pad schedules and relight conditions now, wait until fares are tied to it. 

I would just choose a base fare level, tie it to regional wage growth or inflation, and be done with it. 

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6 minutes ago, RR503 said:

This is a patently terrible idea. If you thought they didn’t have incentive to pad schedules and relight conditions now, wait until fares are tied to it. 

I would just choose a base fare level, tie it to regional wage growth or inflation, and be done with it. 

I disagree. If the fares are to go up, we MUST see service improvements. I am SICK of hourly service on weekends, and in fact some lines haven't seen service improvements in almost a decade.  Aside from that I'm sick of monies being put into the black hole.  

Edited by Via Garibaldi 8

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3 minutes ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

I disagree. If the fares are to go up, we MUST see service improvements. I am SICK of hourly service on weekends, and in fact some lines haven't seen service improvements in almost a decade.  Aside from that I'm sick of monies being put into the black hole.  

I can see the argument for tying fares to frequencies — though that could also allow the MTA to place a much larger portion of cost recovery on riders. 

Service benchmarks like OTP, though, are so easy to manipulate. Just recently, they added running time across the A division. That is a major driver in the “uptick” we’ve seen recently — not the only driver, but a major one. If you tell them you can have more money if you have higher OTP, what’s to stop them from pulling this across the rest of the system? 

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Just now, RR503 said:

I can see the argument for tying fares to frequencies — though that could also allow the MTA to place a much larger portion of cost recovery on riders. 

Service benchmarks like OTP, though, are so easy to manipulate. Just recently, they added running time across the A division. That is a major driver in the “uptick” we’ve seen recently — not the only driver, but a major one. If you tell them you can have more money if you have higher OTP, what’s to stop them from pulling this across the rest of the system? 

I think for this instance that would be the sticking point, but certainly shouldn't become the norm by any means.

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Just now, MysteriousBtrain said:

So basically until we figure out what to do with the (L) we can't get a fare increase?

The one thing Cuomo did right.

The fare hike situation isn't just tied to the (L) .  It's in general.  I spoke with my contact yesterday about my upcoming meeting and he noted how DOT likely isn't happy spending so much money. I told him yeah well taxpayers aren't happy with their service, so they aren't going to happy meeting with us either.

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12 minutes ago, N6 Limited said:

Wouldn't that be interesting.

I was just about to say.... If that option were to be chosen, man, it's looking like we won't be having any fare increases for a loooonnnnngggg ass time.....

But then you stop & think..... Who's going to be setting these benchmarks exactly? And to who's benefit will it be for (the riders or the MTA itself)?

If it's the latter... well all I gotta say is that the parameters are going to be quite:

Screen-Shot-2014-10-12-at-8.22.57-PM-300

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1 hour ago, Via Garibaldi 8 said:

MTA Fare, Toll Hike Won't Take Effect in March as Scheduled Amid L Train, Benchmark Questions

By Andrew Siff

Published Jan 24, 2019 at 5:29 AM | Updated 2 minutes ago

https://gcdn.2mdn.net/videoplayback/id/9c7876f23b41bba0/itag/342/source/doubleclick_dmm/ctier/L/acao/yes/ip/0.0.0.0/ipbits/0/expire/3689672715/sparams/id,itag,source,ctier,acao,ip,ipbits,expire/signature/982011F58E0F3B1C3E02E8C1BD566A6887356891.8D4E4F714845F6C86EC00704ABDC85ABE5AEC6D4/key/ck2/file/file.mp4

The MTA's latest fare hike won't take effect in March as scheduled amid L train and benchmark questions that prompted the Board to delay a vote on the hike breakdown Thursday. 

The agency was expected to vote on the structure of the hike -- whether there should be a base fare increase or elimination of the bonus -- but the MTA's Acting Chairman Fernando Ferrer approved a motion to table the vote until February.

The hike would have gone into effect in March if the vote had taken place and approved it, but it will now be delayed, Ferrer noted. The timing of a new potential hike was unclear as of Thursday. 

Transit sources told News 4 that uncertainty over the L train, as well as a last-minute proposal by a board member to have no fare increase unless the MTA meets certain benchmarks, compelled the board to delay the vote. 

  • The MTA has postponed its planned vote on how to break down the looming subway and bus fare hike until next month
  • The agency was expected to vote on the structure of the hike, but its Acting Chairman approved a motion to table the vote until February
  • The hike would have gone into effect in March if the vote had taken place and approved it

Board members were planning to weigh three different options during the vote. The first option -- raise the base fare to $3 and keep a 10 percent bonus for buying monthly MetroCards. The second -- keep the base fare at $2.75, but eliminate the bonus. The third choice is one that commuters may like the best -- no fare hike unless the MTA meets certain performance goals.

If the board ultimately chooses the latter option, it could trigger a two-week holding pattern and more public hearings would be held before any vote takes place. The fare hike had been set to take effect in March. 

On Tuesday, MTA committee members were met with an earful from riders imploring them not to approve the long-planned fare hike, something commuters have been dreading.

In a statement, the MTA said its "board will have a robust discussion and decide on the best course of action in the context of the MTA's dire financial position, which requires fare and toll increases as well as new, sustainable, adequate sources of funding in order to balance the budget while avoiding painful service cuts."

The MTA approved a $17 billion budget for 2019 last December that assumes a series of broad fare hikes.

https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/MTA-Fare-Hike-Vote-504793171.html?akmobile=o&fbclid=IwAR1wUCrlr5T756v4bJpM9jta1TrcGOPFmaIpGOZgmQCX9XVWA-rbrU48cMs

So it wasn’t complete hearsay that the fare hikes were gonna be blocked...

i do have more hearsay tho, and that is they’re working on having more public hearings citywide and less emphasis on board meetings at 2 Broadway in regards to improving service.

Maybe the (MTA) *is* to change its act, for better or for worse.

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