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Maserati7200

What Is The Overall Top Speed of LIRR

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For the Long Island Rail Road is b/w 60-80 even though the speedometer goes up to 100 and how I know an engineer told and I've been in the cab. As of the (MTA) New York City Subway routes....it depends on the subway car/train from goes b/w 35-40, 40-50.....anyone can help me out if I'm wrong!

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LIRR/MNR

80 mph for passenger

60mph for freight

 

NYC Subway

 

55 mph (even though (N) with R-32's/40's sometimes feel like they're going faster than that thru 60th st tunnel)

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NYC Subway

 

55 mph (even though (N) with R-32's/40's sometimes feel like they're going faster than that thru 60th st tunnel)

 

There is no maximum speed limit in the system, but N/W trains have been known to hit as high as 65 mph in the 60th Street Tube.

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Well, that is fast and there must be a blast of wind all the time at Penn due to L.I.R.R.

 

Well they don't platform at 60, they platform at like 15-20 & ease on the brakes (sometimes not so easy). They they can go into the east river tunnel at up to 60, but they slow down after the tunnel reaches manhattan soil. If you ever see a EMU pull in you can tell that it has just lost a lot of speed.

 

Also, the platform area of penn station is open to the outside, and very large.

 

- A

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My train to Merrick was the 5:40 express and it was slow in reaching Jamaica but in order for it to make up time it hit 87 miles an hour!! sure it was still 7 minutes late but the speed was great. As for the subway when the redbird were around i remember a (2) hitting 60MPH before entering 72st. as well as an R32 (E) train late night hitting 62mph. Lates nights see more speed.... I think.

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My train to Merrick was the 5:40 express and it was slow in reaching Jamaica but in order for it to make up time it hit 87 miles an hour!! sure it was still 7 minutes late but the speed was great. As for the subway when the redbird were around i remember a (2) hitting 60MPH before entering 72st. as well as an R32 (E) train late night hitting 62mph. Lates nights see more speed.... I think.

 

Less service = more headway.

 

- A

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My train to Merrick was the 5:40 express and it was slow in reaching Jamaica but in order for it to make up time it hit 87 miles an hour!! sure it was still 7 minutes late but the speed was great. As for the subway when the redbird were around i remember a (2) hitting 60MPH before entering 72st. as well as an R32 (E) train late night hitting 62mph. Lates nights see more speed.... I think.

 

The R44s had a speed test on LIRR tracks, going past 70 mph.

The average maximum speed is kept at 55mph due to the space between stations, curved tunnels and intense interlining.

The speed is higher on the LIRR due to longer distances set and in general, most tracks are straight.

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LIRR or NYC Subway (J),(Z)?

 

87mph is wonderful, and I cannot believe the (2) and (E) going to 60 without being in the East River bridges/tunnels...

 

Of course, in order to gain speed, we need platforms to have greater distance... And by the way, how many MPH does the train run on the CP West on the (A) and (D) express?

 

LIRR Atlantic Branch, the J is plagued with curves and timers.

I meant, that the stations are spaced FURTHER APART. That is why there will be like 10 streets between 2 stations on the SAS. They stop less and therefore could maintain a higher velocity for a longer period of time.

It depends, doing SB, the A/D slows down at 86th due to 59th Street. But NB is generally fast, the trains don't slow until around 116th.

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As for the subway when the redbird were around i remember a (2) hitting 60MPH before entering 72st.

 

How would you know this? The redbirds didn't have speedometers.

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How would you know this? The redbirds didn't have speedometers.

 

Probably actually took a timer and timed the train between closing the doors at station 1 to opening station 2 and calculate distance? Idk. That's the only way possible, and Google Earth didn't exist back then.

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Probably actually took a timer and timed the train between closing the doors at station 1 to opening station 2 and calculate distance? Idk. That's the only way possible, and Google Earth didn't exist back then.

 

Even if he did that, that would calculate the average speed, not the top speed. And there is no way in hell the average speed was 60 MPH. I'm pretty sure he is just making this up.

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I knew a motorman and while being on his train he sped it up and yes i did the formula explained. The speed was definitely around 60 MPH. Dont care if you believe me or not. I was on that train, it flew uptown, and I enjoyed the hell out of it. Redbirds were the best. The speed of S/B (A)(D) trains stinks because i believe they dont have to slow down that early. The should slow down after 72nd st or just entering it. Make much more sense.

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I knew a motorman and while being on his train he sped it up and yes i did the formula explained. The speed was definitely around 60 MPH. Dont care if you believe me or not. I was on that train, it flew uptown, and I enjoyed the hell out of it. Redbirds were the best. The speed of S/B (A)(D) trains stinks because i believe they dont have to slow down that early. The should slow down after 72nd st or just entering it. Make much more sense.

 

Well at Columbus, the D would have to wait for a B there, if the B was first. This is because the B and D would have to merge in order to reach 7th Avenue. Then the A would be backed up to around 72nd Street. Then the D behind that would have to slow at around 81st or even 86th. That is what happens on my D train around 16:00.

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Nice!!!!!!!!!!

 

On the Metro North New Haven line depending if it's a cab that has a digital speedometer I've seen it up to 80 but soon after comes a speed reduction.

 

on cold days like 6F and maybe 20F I don't think it's ever over 70mph.. I remember getting on the train after it was 10 min late due to a train getting caught in the overhead wire crawling to Stamford from South North at restricted speed.. that alone almost took 30 min

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On the Metro North New Haven line depending if it's a cab that has a digital speedometer I've seen it up to 80 but soon after comes a speed reduction.

 

on cold days like 6F and maybe 20F I don't think it's ever over 70mph.. I remember getting on the train after it was 10 min late due to a train getting caught in the overhead wire crawling to Stamford from South North at restricted speed.. that alone almost took 30 min

 

There's a stretch between Harrison and New Rochelle where trains can reach the maximum permissible velocity of 90 mph. It's just south of "The Pike" interlocking at CP223, and it's a good 2.5 miles at that speed, provided that the weather is fair.

 

Other than that, there are a number of stretches where 60 mph and 75 mph are the limits, though recent restrictions have lowered those speeds even further.

 

I'm not sure if either the Harlem or the Hudson lines top out beyond 70 mph. I'd have to check a map for that.

 

The Acela trains are not even permitted to hit their governed speeds in this part of the world because of tight curves, sudden stations and interlockings and the tracks being so closely spaced.

 

The ATC cab signalling that Metro-North uses allows for greater speeds than traditionally wayside signalling. Is that what LIRR uses?

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