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MattTrain

List of subway lines' trains that do not use platforms to full capacity.

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I'll give a list of subway lines' trains that do not use the platforms to full capacity.

 

(C), only eight 60 foot cars, throughout it's route from 168 Street Manhattan to Euclid Avenue Brooklyn, stops in the 8 car marker, (recently in the "S" marker at the front extreme end) (C) trains are only 480 feet long. (60 foot cars x 8 cars per train = 480 feet in total length)

 

(G) train uses only four R46 cars (75 ft long each) along IND Crosstown, platforms are 600 feet each, stops at the 4 car marker at the center of platforms. There are signs that state "(G) trains stop at center of platform" The (G) trains' total length is 300 feet long (75 foot cars x 4 cars each = 300 feet in total length)

 

(M) Southern Brooklyn: Court Street-Bay Parkway, via 4th Avenue/West End Local. We all know that the BMT Eastern Division platforms ((J)(L)(M)(Z)) aren't 600 feet long, so it's not a surprise that the (M)'s train consists of only eight R160A-1 cars (60 Ft long per car). They stop at the 8 car marker, usually up front or slightly 60-80 feet before the front end. (M) train's total length is usually 480 feet. During Weekends as shuttles, the (M) uses only four-R160A-1 cars, which serve at the center of each of the BMt Myrtle Avenue Platforms. These (M) Shuttle trains are only 240 feet long. (60 foot cars x 4 cars each = 240 foot train)

 

(N) Sea Beach, was originally built for rail road service, then converted for subway. (N) trains stop at the front, so passengers waiting at the extreme back end of the platform must run to at least the middle to catch the (N) train at Sea Beach.

 

(7) Queensboro Plaza: The (N) and (W) trains that show up are 600 feet long. Ten 60 foot cars or eight 75 foot cars for trains. There are 11 car R62A trains for the (7) with each car 51 feet long which equals a 561 foot train (51 foot car x 11 cars for a train = 561 feet, in a 600+ foot platform, although there are gates on the (7) side of the platform.)

 

(S) Franklin Avenue Shuttle at Prospect Park, Brooklyn. Connects with (:P and (Q) only serving the Manhattan bound platform, only two cars long, 150 feet long train (two 75 foot R68 cars)

 

(S) Rockaway Park Shuttle in Queens uses four (75 foot long) R44 train cars, which equal a 300 foot train. The platforms are at least 600 feet long.

 

For Late Nights:

(5) uses five R142 train cars, as shuttles from Dyre Avenue- East 180 Street in the Bronx.

(A) uses four R44 cars as shuttles for Lefferts Boulevard-Euclid Avenue shuttle service.

 

I might have made a mistake or two or probably left something out, if I did please correct me.

 

That's all I have for now.

Edited by MattTrain

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I'll give a list of subway lines' trains that do not use the platforms to full capacity.

 

(C), only eight 60 foot cars, throughout it's route from 168 Street Manhattan to Euclid Avenue Brooklyn, stops in the 8 car marker, (recently in the "S" marker at the front extreme end) (C) trains are only 480 feet long. (60 foot cars x 8 cars per train = 480 feet in total length)

 

(G) train uses only four R46 cars (75 ft long each) along IND Crosstown, platforms are 600 feet each, stops at the 4 car marker at the center of platforms. There are signs that state "(G) trains stop at center of platform" The (G) trains' total length is 300 feet long (75 foot cars x 4 cars each = 300 feet in total length)

 

(M) Southern Brooklyn: Court Street-Bay Parkway, via 4th Avenue/West End Local. We all know that the BMT Eastern Division platforms ((J)(L)(M)(Z)) aren't 600 feet long, so it's not a surprise that the (M)'s train consists of only eight R160A-1 cars (60 Ft long per car). They stop at the 8 car marker, usually up front or slightly 60-80 feet before the front end. (M) train's total length is usually 480 feet. During Weekends as shuttles, the (M) uses only four-R160A-1 cars, which serve at the center of each of the BMt Myrtle Avenue Platforms. These (M) Shuttle trains are only 240 feet long. (60 foot cars x 4 cars each = 240 foot train)

 

(7) Queensboro Plaza: The (N) and (W) trains that show up are 600 feet long. Ten 60 foot cars or eight 75 foot cars for trains. There are 11 car R62A trains for the (7) with each car 51 feet long which equals a 561 foot train (51 foot car x 11 cars for a train = 561 feet, in a 600+ foot platform, although there are gates on the (7) side of the platform.)

 

(S) Franklin Avenue Shuttle at Prospect Park, Brooklyn. Connects with (:P and (Q) only serving the Manhattan bound platform, only two cars long, 150 feet long train (two 75 foot R68 cars)

 

(S) Rockaway Park Shuttle in Queens uses four (75 foot long) R44 train cars, which equal a 300 foot train. The platforms are at least 600 feet long.

 

I might have made a mistake or two or probably left something out, if I did please correct me.

 

That's all I have for now.

 

(S) Rockaway Shuttle uses 8 cars during the summer time.

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(S) Rockaway Shuttle uses 8 cars during the summer time.

 

Oh that's right, I forgot about that one, doesn't that (S) go to Euclid Avenue in Brooklyn during that time also?

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do not count the (7) at Queensboro Plaza. It is less than one IRT car-length shorter than the platform, so catching it not a big deal. There are also many stations in the system that have platforms longer than the standard length of a train, including Fort Hamilton and Bay Parkways on the (N) line, 4th Avenue on the (F) line, the island platform at Essex Street, the northbound Sixth Avenue platform at 34th Street-Herald Square, Vernon Boulevard-Jackson Avenue and the Manhattan-bound platform of Willets Point Shea Stadium on the (7), and 161st Street-Yankee Stadium on the (4) line. I am sure there are more that I have not caught yet.

 

you also have to include the late night shuttles, i.e. the (5)(R) and Lefferts Boulevard.

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Oh that's right, I forgot about that one, doesn't that (S) go to Euclid Avenue in Brooklyn during that time also?

 

nope, the information on http://www.nycsubway.org is wrong. it only uses eight cars on summer weekends. when i visited there on a weekday last summer, it was using the standard four.

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do not count the (7) at Queensboro Plaza. It is less than one IRT car-length shorter than the platform, so catching it not a big deal. There are also many stations in the system that have platforms longer than the standard length of a train, including Fort Hamilton and Bay Parkways on the (N) line, 4th Avenue on the (F) line, the island platform at Essex Street, the northbound Sixth Avenue platform at 34th Street-Herald Square, Vernon Boulevard-Jackson Avenue and the Manhattan-bound platform of Willets Point Shea Stadium on the (7), and 161st Street-Yankee Stadium on the (4) line. I am sure there are more that I have not caught yet.

 

you also have to include the late night shuttles, i.e. the (5)(R) and Lefferts Boulevard.

 

Wow, yeah you're right, the (5) and (R) shuttles What does the (R) and (5) shuttle trains consist of, because I haven't seen them before. I know that some (N) platforms along Sea Beach are longer than standard length train.

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Wow, yeah you're right, the (5) and (R) shuttles What does the (R) and (5) shuttle trains consist of, because I haven't seen them before. I know that some (N) platforms along Sea Beach are longer than standard length train.

 

to prove how funny the Sea Beach Line can be, watch these videos:

 

 

 

 

as for the late night shuttles, i am not exactly sure what they use, but i am assuming five R142s for the (5), four R46s for the (R), and four R44s for the Lefferts Boulevard shuttle.

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Great list!

And also the M in Brooklyn along 4th Avenue.

 

I talked about that in my first post, (M) via 4th Avenue and West End in Brooklyn, on this topic.

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as for the late night shuttles, i am not exactly sure what they use, but i am assuming five R142s for the (5), four R46s for the (R), and four R44s for the Lefferts Boulevard shuttle.

 

 

No, The R shuttles are 600 ft car length.

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Still.

And how about the 42nd Street Shuttle? It seems like the platforms have been truncated.

 

The train cars were very short back then in the early years when that (S) IRT tracks was part of the main line. Remember that those trains were very short. Nowadays, the 42nd Street Shuttle is just a crosstown connector.

 

The platforms for that shuttle were never meant to carry a standard length IRT train, therefore the shuttle platforms were never lengthened which can explain those platforms are very short.

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The train cars were very short back then in the early years when that (S) IRT tracks was part of the main line. Remember that those trains were very short. Nowadays, the 42nd Street Shuttle is just a crosstown connector.

 

The platforms for that shuttle were never meant to carry a standard length IRT train, therefore the shuttle platforms were never lengthened which can explain those platforms are very short.

 

But wait, that accounts for Times Square. But at Grand Central, that was an express station, no? And express stations were supposed to have 10 cars, right?

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But wait, that accounts for Times Square. But at Grand Central, that was an express station, no? And express stations were supposed to have 10 cars, right?

 

The platforms aren't long enough to serve standard IRT trains (10 cars). Remember that trains weren't 10 cars back then, on the IRT, they were shorter.

 

There was a station along the Park Avenue South/Lexington Avenue (6) line at 18th Street, but that was closed because when platforms were lengthened to serve 10 car trains, entrances to 14th street (4)(5)(6) was built at 16th Street, and 23rd Street (6), an entrance was built at 20th street, rendering 18th Street useless.

 

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The platforms aren't long enough to serve standard IRT trains (10 cars). Remember that trains weren't 10 cars back then, on the IRT, they were shorter.

 

There was a station along the Park Avenue South/Lexington Avenue (6) line at 18th Street, but that was closed because when platforms were lengthened to serve 10 car trains, entrances to 14th street (4)(5)(6) was built at 16th Street, and 23rd Street (6), an entrance was built at 20th street, rendering 18th Street useless.

 

 

I remembered that the original system had express stations that could hold up 10 cars. Local stations and platforms (at BB, 14th Street and 96th Street) were for 5 cars.

You see, if you go to the local stations now on the Lexington Line south of 42nd Street, parts of the station have different paint schemes, that is due to the fact that they have been lengthened. There is no evidence that the express stations have been lengthened.

Brooklyn Bridge platforms extend further down from today's south end of the platform. They were extended to the north, therefore the southern most part was abandoned.

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I remembered that the original system had express stations that could hold up 10 cars. Local stations and platforms (at BB, 14th Street and 96th Street) were for 5 cars.

You see, if you go to the local stations now on the Lexington Line south of 42nd Street, parts of the station have different paint schemes, that is due to the fact that they have been lengthened. There is no evidence that the express stations have been lengthened.

Brooklyn Bridge platforms extend further down from today's south end of the platform. They were extended to the north, therefore the southern most part was abandoned.

 

 

Oh wow. I was about to say that there are different paint schemes on most IRT underground stations. The Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall station (4)(5)(6) is unique. You can actually see the abandoned section south of that station from passing trains, or if you're looking from the south end. Cool.

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Oh wow. I was about to say that there are different paint schemes on most IRT underground stations. The Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall station (4)(5)(6) is unique. You can actually see the abandoned section south of that station from passing trains, or if you're looking from the south end. Cool.

 

Yeah the livery changes at those obviously extended stations. However, the fact of the matter is, I am truly convinced by the 10 car express train back then. Look at 14th Street for example, it would be hard to extend a station like that given the constraints.

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Yeah the livery changes at those obviously extended stations. However, the fact of the matter is, I am truly convinced by the 10 car express train back then. Look at 14th Street for example, it would be hard to extend a station like that given the constraints.

 

A 10 car express train would make sense back then. I wonder when the 10 car trains started to run in the IRT system. This could explain why the platforms had to be lengthened because of the longer trains. Gap fillers at 14th Street, due to the curves, and this make 14th Street on the (4)(5)(6) probably the loudest station, next to South Ferry (current) (1) station.

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A 10 car express train would make sense back then. I wonder when the 10 car trains started to run in the IRT system. This could explain why the platforms had to be lengthened because of the longer trains. Gap fillers at 14th Street, due to the curves, and this make 14th Street on the (4)(5)(6) probably the loudest station, next to South Ferry (current) (1) station.

 

IIRC, 10 car trains began to run on the IRT system as soon as express service started. I don't recall if any of the express stations got extended, other than Brooklyn Bridge (which is more of a shift than a platform extension, since the southern part got closed and the northern part opened to replace that). The only stations that were extended were generally the local stations on the original line. Purpose built platforms for the local trains (5 cars only) had existed at Brooklyn Bridge, 14th Street-Union Square and 96th Street. All of these platforms have been abandoned.

If you say that the express stations were extended and that express trains were 5 car trains once, then I debunk that with the situation at 14th Street-Union Square. The curvature of the station would make it very hard for one to extend the platforms in any direction, also, such incidents would have been recorded. There are no reports of such platform extensions.

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