Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.
Sign in to follow this  
error46146

Caution IRS E-mail scam...

Recommended Posts

I received an e-mail from supposedly the IRS telling me to fill out an attached Stimulus Payment Form. Here is the contents of the e-mail:

 

After the last annual calculations of your fiscal activity we have determined that

you are eligible to receive a Stimulus Payment.

Please submit the Stimulus Payment Online Form in order to process it.

 

A Stimulus Payment can be delayed for a variety of reasons.

For example submitting invalid records or applying after the deadline.

 

To submit your Stimulus Payment form, please download the document attached to your email.

 

 

Note: If filing or preparation fees were deducted from your 2007 Refund or you

received a refund anticipation loan, you will be receiving a check instead of a

direct deposit.

 

Regards,

Internal Revenue Service

Now im not stupid first of all the IRS does not know my email address, and second of all the IRS is definitely not going to send me confidential tax stuff like this via regular unencrypted email, 3rd of all the To field says " To:

undisclosed-recipients", and i have gotten scam emails before like this with the To field saying the exact same thing so obviously this is a big nasty SCAM trying to steal my SSN and such.

 

So just to give you guys a heads up always think before you act when you see stuff on the computer like this...

 

So, what do you think about this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think they would use correct grammar as well.

 

"A Stimulus Payment can be delayed for a variety of reasons.

For example submitting invalid records or applying after the deadline."

 

First of all, that only needs to be one sentence. Second, "e.g." would be used instead of "for example."

 

Poor grammar and/or spelling is a dead giveaway of scams.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You would be surprised, but so many people have fallen for this kind of trick in the past... Damn scam artists.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

email servers should log the IP addresses of these bastards and then the gov't strip them of all their wordly possessions for use in balancing the federal budget as much as possible

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that's one less scam avoided. Best thing to do is see if you can get the full headers and report it to the authorities.

 

This spamming non-sense is unbelieveable these days. Those little pricks even get people's cell phone numbers one way or another, and play those fake telemarketer recordings. Thank God for the Do Not Call Registry though. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never get none of that stuff with google. I get zero spam in my gmail account.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love how scam artists don't even bother to check their grammar.

In addition, why would the IRS contact people through e-mail?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I love how scam artists don't even bother to check their grammar.

In addition, why would the IRS contact people through e-mail?

 

Hmmm, yeah, wouldn't they send a letter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.