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It is possible to mix an R62/R62A with an R142/R142A?


S78 via Hylan

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Now how is that possible? a Old Technology Train with a New Technology Train? The R142 has computers inside for the workers while the R62s doesn't. The R142s has different mechanical features such as different breaking system then the R62s. It would be impossible to do that. Plus the trains cant couple to one another (R62-R142), as they got different couplers. Also the R142s technology won't work at all with the R62s technology, one is old and the other is new.

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Can they couple at least? Obviously electrically and pneumatically they're incompatible.

 

The couplers are different from each other so no. Unless they were put the same i guess.

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Can they couple at least? Obviously electrically and pneumatically they're incompatible.

 

I believe they can couple. If so, one set is going to be completely dead while the other runs.

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I believe they can couple. If so, one set is going to be completely dead while the other runs.

 

Have you ever seen the R142 couplers? They look like a flat rectangle while the R62s look like hands almost if im correct(On th R142). So how can they?

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Have you ever seen the R142 couplers? They look like a flat rectangle while the R62s look like hands almost if im correct(On th R142). So how can they?

 

It's just what I heard somewhere, on an earlier topic on this very forum I believe. Let's get DOB or some other T/O to set things straight.

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Well, it is obvious! Why would a R-62/62A be coupled to a R-142/142A? If this is really possibly, I would see the (MTA) couple R-68/68A with R-160's! This is impossible, a NTT with a Middle-Ager won't happen...

 

Why? Usually because one train has died completely and the other is used to push/pull it. There is no guarantee that any two consecutive trains will be of the same class. Of course anytime you see such a lashup, the train will not be in customer service, since one half of it will be dead.

 

By sheer coincidence, I spent all day writing the procedures for NTT-to-SMEE and NTT-to-NTT rescue operations for New Tech Operator Training Manual.

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Why? Usually because one train has died completely and the other is used to push/pull it. There is no guarantee that any two consecutive trains will be of the same class. Of course anytime you see such a lashup, the train will not be in customer service, since one half of it will be dead.

 

By sheer coincidence, I spent all day writing the procedures for NTT-to-SMEE and NTT-to-NTT rescue operations for New Tech Operator Training Manual.

 

wouldnt they use a diesel fueled work train(Forgot wats that car called) instead?

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wouldnt they use a diesel fueled work train(Forgot wats that car called) instead?

 

To do that they'd have to bring the loco out of the yard and charge past every train already on the tracks... better to take a trainset out of service that's close to the incident.

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Compromise coupler of sorts. They exist on the LIRR to connect Harold protect engines (type E coupler) to an M3/M7 (Budd pin-and-cup).

 

Edit: now that I think about it, one of those engines has the Budd coupler installed already. Type E on one side (for bi-levels), Budd on the other (for MUs)

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Will the couplers connect to each other?

 

But yet, diffusedmind answered the question so it's over... A compromise coupler is probably the solution.

 

A compromise is the answer and the inoperable train will be dead weight. Up at Branford (the trolley museum) we use a compromise on our R17 (SMEE) to we can move other equipment. The compromise we use is an H2C to Ohio Brass. The R44/46 and NTTs use an Ohio Brass coupler so what we use up there is the same as what would be used to have a train equipped with an H2C move a NTT. An R44/46 can the NTTs can be coupled iron to iron for an emergency move also.

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Well, the rescue procedure won't happen that way. In the Subway, no train will push/pull another train unless if the dead train is non-operatable. They'll just rescue the passenger thats it. And what exactly would happen if a NTT-to-SMEE is to occur? Tell the story if you would like to since I find it rather interesting, odd and surprising.

 

By its very definition, a dead train is inoperable. In the Fall of '07, I moved a NTT-to-NTT rescue from Bowling green to Unionport Yard. The consist was (North Motor)5 cars no power, 5 cars no air, 10 good cars(South Motor). I operated from car #11 of a 20 car train.

 

All NTTs have a coupler adapter in each 'A' car that mounts on the OB hook-type coupler of the NTT and converts to the "standard" H2C coupler of SMEE-type trains. Follow the procedures for installation, make the add iron-to-iron between the two trains, BCO and MCO the dead one and move out.

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