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LRG

Just a friendly reminder to WATCH THE GAP!!!

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This morning i transferred from the (A) at Fulton Street for the (4) and it ran normally. At Union Square, passengers were alighting and boarding, and some woman didn't step over the gap, and her leg went right through! Yup, straight through. After seeing that incident the MTA really has to do something about fixing the platform gaps to prevent stuff like that from happening like that again. In the meantime, mind the gap peoples.

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This morning i transferred from the (A) at Fulton Street for the (4) and it ran normally. At Union Square, passengers were alighting and boarding, and some woman didn't step over the gap, and her leg went right through! Yup, straight through. After seeing that incident the MTA really has to do something about fixing the platform gaps to prevent stuff like that from happening like that again. In the meantime, mind the gap peoples.

 

If they "fix" that platform so that there's no gap, the end excess of the train will hit the platform. The only way that gap goes away is a multi million dollar massive reconstruction that takes a year (at least) to realign the platforms, during which service could not pass through that station, which won't happen.

 

People just need to be aware of their surroundings and that you have to be responsible for your own safety in a subway system because it's not a game down here...

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I hope she was ok.

 

Yeah she was okay, but she was traumatized as hell!

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If they "fix" that platform so that there's no gap, the end excess of the train will hit the platform. The only way that gap goes away is a multi million dollar massive reconstruction that takes a year (at least) to realign the platforms, during which service could not pass through that station, which won't happen.

 

People just need to be aware of their surroundings and that you have to be responsible for your own safety in a subway system because it's not a game down here...

 

And actually, the MTA could install a rubbing board, which would take about a month or two. And the curvatre at the nortehrn express track of Union Square is not sharp at all, so there should be no reason for such a gap. And it's ridiculous to see 8-inch gaps at straight-edged stations.

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And actually, the MTA could install a rubbing board, which would take about a month or two. And the curvatre at the nortehrn express track of Union Square is not sharp at all, so there should be no reason for such a gap. And it's ridiculous to see 8-inch gaps at straight-edged stations.

 

As explained before, the gap is there at Union Square for a reason. If you cloes the gap, trains will hit the platform. There is a rubber rubbing board in use at that station, but no matter what it is made out of the train can not contact it. Union Square is over 100 years old, if they could close the gap, it would have been done by now.

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As explained before, the gap is there at Union Square for a reason. If you cloes the gap, trains will hit the platform. There is a rubber rubbing board in use at that station, but no matter what it is made out of the train can not contact it. Union Square is over 100 years old, if they could close the gap, it would have been done by now.

 

We kicked this problem around in a school car class over 25 years ago. The solution is one which would cause a massive uproar from the ridership. CLOSE the IRT station at Union Square. Re-open the 18th St local stations while extending the platforms southward enabling 10 car trains ( local only ) to connect with the BMT 14th St- Union Square stations. This means a passageway would have to be built from 18th St to about 15th or 16th St to connect with the BMT Broadway line and the existing passageways to the 14th St line. There would be no connection to the Lexington Ave express trains under this scenario. Imagine the protests. Otherwise, be aware and mind the gap.

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Yea, sounds like a bad idea. What is the reason for the strange platform alignment at 14th Street any way?

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I believe the tunnel is the "wrong" shape for the track because of an underground obstruction they couldn't move using methods available in 1900's.

 

I'm pretty sure there is one other station like this, plus some stations gently curve the platform back from the train's area towards the end in case of derailment its guided into the track pit vs slam into a platform ledge.

 

- A

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this is why i dont want my mom traveling by herself on the (4)(5)(6) lines, especially transferring between the (N)(Q)(R)(W) and (4)(5)(6) at Union Sq:

 

1. TOO CROWDED.

2. SHE CANT SEE THE GAP WHEN THE STATION IS FILLED WITH ALOT OF PEOPLE.

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this is why i dont want my mom traveling by herself on the (4)(5)(6) lines, especially transferring between the (N)(Q)(R)(W) and (4)(5)(6) at Union Sq:

 

1. TOO CROWDED.

2. SHE CANT SEE THE GAP WHEN THE STATION IS FILLED WITH ALOT OF PEOPLE.

 

Usually having a massive amount of people in a station with a huge gaps tends to lead into a positive thing. That way if your foot does fall into the gap, the crowd can signal the conductor to not close the doors and drive off yet.

__________

 

Yep, the tunnel boring technique and the station placement construction back in the 1900s wasn't as sophisticated as it is now today. And don't think the passengers back in the 1900s had no problem with the stations, the Low-Vs probably faced the same issue with the gaps.

 

And also, as somebody mentioned, if they could have done someting with Union Square, they would have done it by now. Not only is it a pain to the riders, it's also a pain to the train operators operating with the R62s (that were once formerly there) because they didn't have the technology to know if all gaps on the train were completely closed.

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Usually having a massive amount of people in a station with a huge gaps tends to lead into a positive thing. That way if your foot does fall into the gap, the crowd can signal the conductor to not close the doors and drive off yet.

 

Actually that's not always true. Usually they will just stand around and act clueless, and fail to get the conductor's attention while simultaneously blocking him from seeing what's wrong.

 

Happened at Penn Sta with a wheelchair caught in the gap a couple years back...

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the Low-Vs probably faced the same issue with the gaps.

 

Actually, they didn't. The door placement was designed so that it would always align with the platform even on curves.

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Actually that's not always true. Usually they will just stand around and act clueless, and fail to get the conductor's attention while simultaneously blocking him from seeing what's wrong.

 

LOL thats SOOO true! :cool:

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And also, as somebody mentioned, if they could have done someting with Union Square, they would have done it by now. Not only is it a pain to the riders, it's also a pain to the train operators operating with the R62s (that were once formerly there) because they didn't have the technology to know if all gaps on the train were completely closed.

 

Actually that's not true. There's a leaving "signal" off to the side ahead of the platform that indicates when the gap fillers have retracted. It detects the train's movement, and once the train is past a certain point, pulls in the gap fillers and the light goes out.

 

That's why you see T/O's leave Union Square S/B and take a point of power, knock off, and coast for a few seconds, then they wrap it up and leave the station quickly (after the gap fillers have come back in).

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Actually that's not true. There's a leaving "signal" off to the side ahead of the platform that indicates when the gap fillers have retracted. It detects the train's movement, and once the train is past a certain point, pulls in the gap fillers and the light goes out.

 

That's why you see T/O's leave Union Square S/B and take a point of power, knock off, and coast for a few seconds, then they wrap it up and leave the station quickly (after the gap fillers have come back in).

 

This is true, the train goes slowly and pulls out when the fillers retract.

 

But this incident pertains to the uptown platform where it seems relatively straight at the north end on the express track. If the curve were that extreme, a gap filler would have to be added, so there should be no reason for anyone to have their leg caught in a gap. Trip over one, that's understandable, that happened to one of my friends, but to fall into a gap is ridiculous.

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Usually having a massive amount of people in a station with a huge gaps tends to lead into a positive thing. That way if your foot does fall into the gap, the crowd can signal the conductor to not close the doors and drive off yet.

__________

 

Yep, the tunnel boring technique and the station placement construction back in the 1900s wasn't as sophisticated as it is now today. And don't think the passengers back in the 1900s had no problem with the stations, the Low-Vs probably faced the same issue with the gaps.

 

And also, as somebody mentioned, if they could have done someting with Union Square, they would have done it by now. Not only is it a pain to the riders, it's also a pain to the train operators operating with the R62s (that were once formerly there) because they didn't have the technology to know if all gaps on the train were completely closed.

 

And also, if the passenger is caught in a sticky situation but gets caught between the doors, then the train can't move because the doors aren't closed and secured.

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